Quick answer please-Can concrete roof tiles be repaired?


After power washing my roof I see that some of the concrete tiles have holes and some are cracked. Can these be successfully repaired and how could I do this?
I don't know how I could nail down new tiles if I broke out the old ones.
Quick answer please.
Beemer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you even stop to consider how rude it is to demand from anonymous benevolent sources that they answer your question quickly? What makes you so special to demand this extra attention? This isn't a service where people are hanging around to answer your questions for you. Its a friendly "you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours" way for people to help each other out. Don't abuse it by demanding answers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| > holes | > and some are cracked. Can these be successfully repaired and how could I | > do this? | > | > I don't know how I could nail down new tiles if I broke out the old ones. | > | > Quick answer please. | > | > Beemer | | Do you even stop to consider how rude it is to demand from anonymous | benevolent sources that they answer your question quickly? What makes you so | special to demand this extra attention? This isn't a service where people | are hanging around to answer your questions for you. Its a friendly "you | scratch my back, I'll scratch yours" way for people to help each other out. | Don't abuse it by demanding answers. | | | Not a demand but a request. However for those sensitive folk out there I apologise profusely. I'll now get back on the roof where I have now decided to replace rather then repair the tiles.
Beemer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

'Beemer' is how BMW owners refer to their cars. This could explain the arrogance.
mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.top20fun.com/funny_jokes/1419.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Beemer wrote:

Beemer,
How did the power wash and tile sealing go?
To "repair" your tiles you have to actually replace them - and depending upon tile type etc, these could be nailed from every course to every fifth or sixth course.
The problem could be not how to fix the tiles, but how to get the nails out in the first place - there is a simple answer of course (the same as the renailing), but let's see if you can work it out!
Finally, if you don't know how to "nail down" the new tiles then you really should be not be thinking of doing the job!
A little knowledge doesn't go very far does it?
All the best
Brian G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| Beemer wrote: | > After power washing my roof I see that some of the concrete tiles | > have holes and some are cracked. Can these be successfully repaired | > and how could I do this? | > | > I don't know how I could nail down new tiles if I broke out the old | > ones. | > | > Quick answer please. | > | > Beemer | | Beemer, | | How did the power wash and tile sealing go? | | To "repair" your tiles you have to actually replace them - and depending | upon tile type etc, these could be nailed from every course to every fifth | or sixth course. | | The problem could be not how to fix the tiles, but how to get the nails out | in the first place - there is a simple answer of course (the same as the | renailing), but let's see if you can work it out! | | Finally, if you don't know how to "nail down" the new tiles then you really | should be not be thinking of doing the job! | | A little knowledge doesn't go very far does it? | | All the best | | Brian G | Brian,
I powerwashed my roof which revealed more damaged tiles. A Phenol based fungas killer was applied. New replacement tiles were purchased and today I will replace them using a nail stripper. They have "nibs and I will glue the tail ends. I have bought 50 litres of synthetic resin Reno-roof liquid which will allow me to apply two coats.
Thanks,
Beemer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Beemer wrote:

Beemer, Partly in response to your post to keith_765 - "However your description below has me confused"
That in fact that should be a 'slate ripper' and unless your tiles are nailed at every course (unlikely) then you don't really need a 'ripper' on tiles (and even if they are, once you've got one course sorted - then the others are easy) - I've seen a lot of damage done on tiled roofs with a ripper in the wrong hands!
To change a tile, simply push the one above it back up the roof until it slides under the one above that.
If that tile is nailed, then ditto the one above that and pull out the nail with a claw hammer or pincers - and remove the tile.
When you have eventually replaced the broken tile, simply slide the other tile back down onto it - you may have to use some sort of a lever just to take the weight off the tile to grip it and allow it to slide!
As a matter of interest, what does the "They have "nibs and I will glue the tail ends" mean?
Are talking about the 'nibs' at the top of the tile and on the underside of it? If that is the case, then 'gluing' them may well be a rather large mistake to make - its those 'nibs' that hook over the roof batten to stop the tile sliding under pressure - like that of a couple of tons of snow - and the nails are a secondary line of defence as the say - and if you are only using these to hold the tiles in place then.......
All you do is lift the old tile off the batten and simply drop the new one back in place - with 'nibs' definitely intact!
As I previously said "A *little knowledge* doesn't go very far does it?"
Brian G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

holes
No they aren't worth repairing, they are cheap enough to replace. If the tiles are of the double lap 10"1/2 x 6"1/2 same size as Rosemary tile you should be able to lift out the tile by sliding a trowel underneath and lift and pull down. If the damaged tile is nailed, take out the tiles above until you can access the nail. Single lap interlocking tiles, you just push the two tiles above and lift out the damaged tile, then after replacement of the new one, put a trowel under the ones above and with the palm of your hand on top of the tile just pull down.
Dont piss about, get it done immediately, instantly. There's your quick answer. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| > After power washing my roof I see that some of the concrete tiles have | holes | > and some are cracked. Can these be successfully repaired and how could I | > do this? | > | > I don't know how I could nail down new tiles if I broke out the old ones. | > | > Quick answer please. | > | > Beemer | No they aren't worth repairing, they are cheap enough to replace. If the | tiles are of the double lap 10"1/2 x 6"1/2 same size as Rosemary tile you | should be able to lift out the tile by sliding a trowel underneath and lift | and pull down. If the damaged tile is nailed, take out the tiles above until | you can access the nail. | Single lap interlocking tiles, you just push the two tiles above and lift | out the damaged tile, then after replacement of the new one, put a trowel | under the ones above and with the palm of your hand on top of the tile just | pull down. | | Dont piss about, get it done immediately, instantly. There's your quick | answer. LOL | Keith,
I have now bought the tiles and a nail stripper so hope to have the job done today. However your description below has me confused:
"then after replacement of the new one, put a trowel under the ones above and with the palm of your hand on top of the tile just pull down"
Did you mean "push down"? i.e. ensuring that the nails in the tiles above are reseated?
Beemer
thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

you
lift
trowel
done
above
Cut You don't use a slate rip on tiles. a slate rip is for either cutting through copper, zinc or alloy slate nails to get slates out and on accessions lifting the head of a slate over the top of a lath, full stop.As Beemar says "in the wrong hands they can do a lot of damage. the statement I made about using a trowel under the tiles above, is to lift the tile as you pull the tile down over the ones below. This is on interlocking tiles.Gluing in tiles is not a good idea. Are you intending to cover the roof with some water proof coating ?.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| | | > | No they aren't worth repairing, they are cheap enough to replace. If the | > | tiles are of the double lap 10"1/2 x 6"1/2 same size as Rosemary tile | you | > | should be able to lift out the tile by sliding a trowel underneath and | > lift | > | and pull down. If the damaged tile is nailed, take out the tiles above | > until | > | you can access the nail. | > | Single lap interlocking tiles, you just push the two tiles above and | lift | > | out the damaged tile, then after replacement of the new one, put a | trowel | > | under the ones above and with the palm of your hand on top of the tile | > just | > | pull down. | > | | > | Dont piss about, get it done immediately, instantly. There's your quick | > | answer. LOL | > | | > Keith, | > | > I have now bought the tiles and a nail stripper so hope to have the job | done | > today. | > However your description below has me confused: | > | > "then after replacement of the new one, put a trowel under the ones above | > and with the palm of your hand on top of the tile just pull down" | > | > Did you mean "push down"? i.e. ensuring that the nails in the tiles | above | > are reseated? | | Cut | You don't use a slate rip on tiles. a slate rip is for either cutting | through copper, zinc or alloy slate nails to get slates out and on | accessions lifting the head of a slate over the top of a lath, full stop.As | Beemar says "in the wrong hands they can do a lot of damage. the statement I | made about using a trowel under the tiles above, is to lift the tile as you | pull the tile down over the ones below. This is on interlocking tiles.Gluing | in tiles is not a good idea. Are you intending to cover the roof with some | water proof coating ?. | | Keith,
I now realise that the ripper I bought is redundant as the nails come out easily when lifting the concrete corrugated tiles. The replacement tile nibs hook over the battens and as I cannot insert a nail I place mastic tacks on the lower end as security. The roof has been covered with anti fungacide and now has had one coat of synthetic resin based paint with another to be shortly applied.
thanks,
Beemer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Beemer wrote:

Beemer,
Well done, the problem you will have next is trying to get a 'broken' tile off that's been 'stuck' with mastic - a true builders from hell 'bodge' - especially if they break due to you walking on 'em to carry out the 'painting'.
Generally roof tiles are not nailed at every course (every fifth is usual) and the courses in between these are simply rested on the battens and the nibs on the stop them 'slipping' and the tile lap and weight hold them down in all but the most severe weather.
Brian G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| >> | >> | >>>> No they aren't worth repairing, they are cheap enough to replace. | >>>> If the tiles are of the double lap 10"1/2 x 6"1/2 same size as | >>>> Rosemary tile you should be able to lift out the tile by sliding a | >>>> trowel underneath and lift and pull down. If the damaged tile is | >>>> nailed, take out the tiles above until you can access the nail. | >>>> Single lap interlocking tiles, you just push the two tiles above | >>>> and lift out the damaged tile, then after replacement of the new | >>>> one, put a trowel under the ones above and with the palm of your | >>>> hand on top of the tile just pull down. | >>>> | >>>> Dont piss about, get it done immediately, instantly. There's your | >>>> quick answer. LOL | >>>> | >>> Keith, | >>> | >>> I have now bought the tiles and a nail stripper so hope to have the | >>> job done today. | >>> However your description below has me confused: | >>> | >>> "then after replacement of the new one, put a trowel under the ones | >>> above and with the palm of your hand on top of the tile just pull | >>> down" | >>> | >>> Did you mean "push down"? i.e. ensuring that the nails in the | >>> tiles above are reseated? | >> | >> Cut | >> You don't use a slate rip on tiles. a slate rip is for either cutting | >> through copper, zinc or alloy slate nails to get slates out and on | >> accessions lifting the head of a slate over the top of a lath, full | >> stop.As Beemar says "in the wrong hands they can do a lot of damage. | >> the statement I made about using a trowel under the tiles above, is | >> to lift the tile as you pull the tile down over the ones below. This | >> is on interlocking tiles.Gluing in tiles is not a good idea. Are you | >> intending to cover the roof with some water proof coating ?. | >> | >> | > Keith, | > | > I now realise that the ripper I bought is redundant as the nails come | > out easily when lifting the concrete corrugated tiles. The | > replacement tile nibs hook over the battens and as I cannot insert a | > nail I place mastic tacks on the lower end as security. The roof | > has been covered with anti fungacide and now has had one coat of | > synthetic resin based paint with another to be shortly applied. | > | > thanks, | > | > Beemer | | Beemer, | | Well done, the problem you will have next is trying to get a 'broken' tile | off that's been 'stuck' with mastic - a true builders from hell 'bodge' - | especially if they break due to you walking on 'em to carry out the | 'painting'. | | Generally roof tiles are not nailed at every course (every fifth is usual) | and the courses in between these are simply rested on the battens and the | nibs on the stop them 'slipping' and the tile lap and weight hold them down | in all but the most severe weather. | | Brian G | Brian,
Well its job done. Twelve (!) tiles replaced with them having cracks or holes. Second coat of synthetic resin based paint applied. I used a roof ladder with hook and a security rope and belt. Thank goodness I was roped as I had two slips on wet paint where I had earlier put down my brush. I used a 6" brush after trying a 12" roller. The brush was actually easier to use and gave that confidence that the paint was being "worked in". This was a job I would not welcome repeating as it was just too much for my 60 year old wrist!
Beemer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Beemer wrote:

Well done Beemer - from 58 year old retired local authority Housing General Maintenance Foreman (and chippie).
I must admit, with my experience, I personally would have left things well alone - it's too bloody high now for me to fall :-)
Brian G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.