Painting Walls and ceiling problem


We want to roll the bathroom walls , but not in the same colour as the new ceiling.
How do we get a neat straight line where the two colours divide ??
Cheers
Dee
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You'll need to roller the walls as near to the ceiling as you dare and then finish off with a brush. Or you could roller right up to the ceiling and then paint over the colour that's got on the ceiling with a brush and ceiling colour.
Rob Graham
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says...

Whichever way you do it, stop painting a millimetre back from the joint. If you get any closer, and don't possess the hand of a heart surgeon, you'll start putting dabs on the wrong side which will catch the eye. A clean narrow gap won't.
Also if you find yourself taking ages to get it just so, stop staring at the brush and start looking at the paint line it's leaving instead. Once you get your eye in this can be much quicker and reduces the odds of an error.
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As the previous posters have already said but a good (not cheap) paint brush also helps.
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Do you cut in first and then roller or roller and then cut in?
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snipped-for-privacy@blueblueyonder.co.uk says...

There's absolutely nowt wrong with cutting in first. Just make sure to feather the inside edge well to make sure you don't get a dry hard edge showing through the rolled. The only real pitfall is that since your eye isn't accustomed to seeing the paint density of a full wall there can be a tendency to go a little thin with the coat. You don't want to be doing it twice.
If both quality of finish AND speed are of importance you might want to roller-then-cut as you go. You'll be up and down the ladder more but be done much quicker.
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I always cut in first and then try to get the roller on before the cut-in paint has dried. Reason being the texture left by brush and roller is different and I would prefer the roller pattern to dominate. Also, after doing the cutting-in at ceiling level I would roller in the horizontal direction for one width to get a broader 'landing zone' for when rolling vertically.
--
fred
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I always roll first, I'm never quite sure how much to brush until afterwards.
Andy
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Gotcha, I get ready to go with the roller, paint in tray etc, then use a 3" brush edge on to do the cut, then rough 3" swipe with the brush, then swipe with the roller in line with the cut but an inch or so out. That then leaves me a good 9" landing zone in the roller texture and still wet to make a clean join with the vertical roller strokes.
Work quickly and keep the room cool to avoid the paint drying too quickly so you are always working to a wet edge.
--
fred
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Thanks everyone, all helps.
Dee

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