DIY Car De-froster


Here's a handy little tip we use in our car for when it's cold and frosty. Fill a hot water bottle and place it on the drivers side of the dash. Turn the vents on a low speed and whilst the engine is warming up it'll defrost / keep the windscreen clear from the heat from the hot water bottle. Saves time and makes setting off a little safer until the engine has warmed up.
Ash.
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Ash wrote:

I just cover the windscreen with one of those cheapy aluminium foil covers - that stops the frost - and also saves fuel and wear from leaving the engine running at idle from a cold start for 10 - 20 minutes!
I had a better one at one time, simply put the car in the garage overnight - until SWMBO discovered that *she* could find a better use for it as storage for anything she didn't want in the house, including the bloody recycling bin! LOL
Cash
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Know the feeling well ... our garage is full of items for either the car boot sale (which never seems to happen) or for Justin (Just In Case). I've often asked SWMBO why, when we have just bought something new to replace a worn out item, she must keep the old one "Just in Case". The old one worked without fault for years so why keep an old one in case the new one breaks down in ... isn't that what the warranty is for?
Ash
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Ash wrote:

. The only downside to that is that most engine wear occurs during the period between the engine being started and it reaching normal operating temperature. This period is extended dramatically if you simply allow the engine to 'idle' up to operating temperature. All car manufacturers recommend that you drive off as soon as possible after the engine has started because this ensures that the engine reaches normal operating temperature as quickly as possible.
My tip for keeping my windows clear? I just put the car in the garage every night and then it's never frosted over!
Ret.
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On Thu, 12 Feb 2009 10:18:50 -0000, "Ret." <xxx> wrote:

"Warming up" the engine is sounding it's own death knell, petrol washes the oil from the bores and rings, vastly increasing wear rates. Empty plastic milk container or lemonade bottle, fill to about an inch with *hot* water and then to the top with cold. Unlock vehicle, start engine, blowers on screen, switch on rear screen heater, pour water over side windows and front windscreen to wash off all ice, toss empty container on rear floor, drive away, job's a good 'un. Been doing that since around 1972 and always enjoy the look on the faces of neighbours as I drive away while they're still busily scraping.
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I have used that method on every car I have ever owned, never had a problem. I love it because unlike using chemical sprays it stops your breath from freezing on the inside by warming the glass a little.
Mike
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Same here - except we don't add any cold water. Splash liberally over all windows (inc rear) and lights (if necessary).
But one word of WARNING... I always check the wiper blades (inc h/lamp wipers) are not frozen to glass BEFORE turning ignition. If wiper switch had previously been left on, or wipers were not in "park" position, it can (and did once) wreck motor &/or mechanism... :-(
Am still trying to fathom how DIYers ever manage to squeeze a car into a garage...!
--
Martin



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Works for me too, but the water should be pleasantly warm, not hot. I have seen a screen crack through when hot water hits ice cold glass. The only good thing is, it wasn't my screen.
--
Keith W
Sunbury on Thames
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I have always used it at the temperature it comes out of the hot tap and from my first car, a 1956 Morris Traveller to present, 2008 VW I have never known a screen crack from the hot water.
Mike
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I reckon you've been lucky. I use the kettle that I made the morning tea with, it's usually half full and I top it up with cold. Does the job fine and is definitely not hot enough to crack a screen. I was told by a chap who worked for one of these windscreen replacement firms that the crack is caused because the screen actually consists of two layers of glass with an insert in between and getting the outer glass too hot causes it to expand faster than the inner one. Anyway, that was his story.
--
Keith W
Sunbury on Thames
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