Small Bay Window 45 x 45

I have a small 28W x 35H kitchen window and are planning to open the window up to 45 x 45 and install a small bay window - probably each of the 3 panels would be the same width. There is no problem opening the wall up, but I am running into windows companies having a minimum opening of 60-in wide. They all try to talk me into a large window but I am limited on space so 45 is the max.
Couple of questions -- why is the bay window so much more expensive to purchase and install that the standard tract-home style sliding window? Prices I am getting are about $1100 to enlarge the window to code, another $1000 for the window and another $1000 to install it.
Thanks in advance!
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A quick check of my Andersen catalog shows that their smallest is 56", and those are 90 degree box bays, not angled bays. Their smallest angle bay is 64". 45" would really be a small bay. If you can't locate a standard 45" unit, it could be made up from individual windows, but that is a lot of expert woodworking.
I'm running into a similar sizing problem. I would like to put eliptical sunbursts over two 36" windows, but nobody makes eliptical versions under 63", only half-round.
-- Dennis
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Thanks, Dennis. Keep looking for those sunbursts! You'll find them somewhere I'm sure.
says...

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John Curtiss wrote:

Well, how does the fully complete bay compare to three standard windows?

What code are we speaking of here? Can't be an egress consideration, surely??? I was assuming this was over sink in kitchen but guess it could be elsewhere.
If you're limited to less than what standard sizes are available, your choices are to either forget the idea, have a custom unit manufactured (say $$$) or build in-situ. Depending on where you are, there may be local manufacturers who will do the second and depending on your project you may be able to get the last. Except for the potential for having the opening open to the weather for a longer time, it's likely the most cost-effective option if you can arrange it to use standard sizes for all three. This small, I'd be tempted to make the two side units relatively small and fixed.
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Std windows are around $150-250 plus $200 each for installation. Even if you enlarge all three std window frames, the small bay is still less.

Yes, over the sink. I'm talking about installing the new header, water seal, etc. -- typical things inspectors look for when creating a new opening. Egress is not a factor here.

Today we found a standard "off the shelf" bay with 30 degree sides instead of 45. Looks great, and they can do 45-inches wide as standard. And can go down to 36-inches wide. And the two side panels are casement.

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"John Curtiss" wrote

I'm surprised you don't open your lines of communication with the potential contractors, and ask exactly what you did here.
Personally, I think with a bay window, the two end windows should equal the fixed picture window. Otherwise, you get a funky looking bay. Also, the projection of the bay should have an appearance to blend in with the rest of the structure. Projection is how far the window projects out from the structure, this is part of the window specifications along with the sizing.
Bay windows are more expensive to make, than a standard window. You have a seat & the head, which are normally specified in oak. You will need a roof, or sometimes people prefer to save money if they have a large overhang, and finish off the window without a roof (ugh). You will also need to insulate the seat board, and depending on the option you chose to finish the underside of bay, the cost will vary greatly.
To enlarge a window, most of the time, except in rare instances, you will have to reframe for a header opening. You will also have to cut siding, and depending on what type of siding you have, the price will be reflective.
For such a small opening, you may want to look into a garden window.
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Acutally I did. Basically it's because this is a small job by contractor standards and all the contractors I contacted are backlogged 2-3 months here in Calif. Driving around the neighborhood, there is a least one home improvement project on every street.

Yes, a bay window is more expensive. Prices I get are a 45 x 45 bay (not installed) is $1000-1500. A 45 x 45 std slider is $200.

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If anyone is interested, I just posted a photo of a 36-inch wide bay I saw this afternoon at alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking. Sides are casement at 30 degrees.

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Anybody have rough plans to build a bay window? Have looked in the usual places and can't seem to find anything.
Thanks in advance!!
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