Plinth?

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Hi,
When a developer tells you that your property has been contructed "up to Plinth" what does that actually mean? Does is actually make any sense?
Any thoughts would be appreciated.
Thanks
VJ
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In a previous post snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote...

Makes no sense to me.
"Plinth" is defined as:
1. A block or slab on which a pedestal, column, or statue is placed. 2. The base block at the intersection of the baseboard and the vertical trim around an opening. 3. A continuous course of stones supporting a wall. Also called plinth course. 4. A square base, as for a vase.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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wrote...

Maybe local zoning colloquial implying that from here up you'll have to step back, but it's just a guess.
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MichaelB
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Are you sure he didn't say it was "constructed to plans" but had terrible pronunciation and a lisp?
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Yes, makes sense to me. I would expect the foundations to have been finished and the walls built up until just out of the ground (could be a few inches of feet). The lower floor surface may also have been constructed. Something like this...
http://img466.imageshack.us/img466/3416/img0342kj8.jpg
A true plinth true is a thickening of the lower part of the wall to strengthen it or give it a more robust appearance. Not a very common feature these days but I've got one on my house. The top edge where the wall thickness reduces to normal thickness is frequently capped with sloping bricks so any rain water runs off.
Some wood framed houses are built on a brick plinth.
If your house has no such feature the builder is probably just using this as short hand to mean "out of the ground" or whatever the local term is for the stage shown in my photo above. Possibly slightly earlier as my photo shows the floor down.
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Is that a British term?

What is the material on the horizontal plane in that picture?

...also traditionally known as a 'watercourse'.
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MichaelB
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Normally they would say "out of the ground" or "at DPC (damp proof course) level"

It's a beam and block floor. Concrete beams (Inverted T shape) with light weight concrete blocks. Later it gets a layer of insulation, UFH and screed on top.
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I've heard that term too.
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: >> : >> Is that a British term? :
The British rockstar , Jeff Beck wrote a song called "PLYNTH (Water Down the Drain)" This was back in the old days when he had a little known singer singing it ..... goin down...goin down down down down down. The singer of course was Rod Stuart.
Now back to construction
peace dawg
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In a previous post Deputy Dumbya Dawg wrote...

Man, that brought back some strange memories!
Saw Jeff Beck with Rod Stewart at Eagles Auditorium in Seattle. Must have been late 60's
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Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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And, this is only the if person in question has accepted the site and the house design to fit the foundation that has been previously constructed. Maybe the person has his own idea of his desired design which might not match the 'plinth' height and geometry as told. Then what???? CID...
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Don't know what he means. see Bob Morrisons description of a plinth.
CID
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Here you are ... sectional drawings of a brick plinth...
http://www.ibstock.com/architects-cad-downloads.asp
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More..
http://www.archifacts.co.uk/html/brick_plinth_detailing1a.htm
http://images.google.com/images?svnum &hl=en&lr=&q=%22brick+plinth%22+
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My experience with a plinth is as in a plinth block, the bottom piece of a door casing, often ornate and from 6 to 12 inches high. I've even seen/used them on the top of the door side casing but usually they are called capitals up there
Anyway I guess what I'm talking about is spelled the same way.

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I've heard that one too. Usually big enough to stop the baseboard.
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MichaelB
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Yes I know what you mean.
In the UK the little block at the bottom of a door architrave seems to be called a Pilaster...although a Pilaster is technically full height - more like a fake column.
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Around here a pilaster is a short thicken of a wall, usually a basement wall, to make it stronger. It can be either inside or outside the wall and is usually 8" x 16".with heavy vertical re-bar.
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That's a common modern usage too. The original meaning of the word was a column 'engaged' in a wall, but often articulated somewhat like associated columns or 'orders' in the same building, for buildings that had orders....
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for buildings that had orders....

Hmmm, did they obey?
Must be another UK term that I'm not familiar with.
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