Need help with cleaning car carpets

Ok so my sister came into town and took my car out with my niece and nephew and well they both had slurpees (YES CHERRY!!) well I guess my niece had a fit and threw the slurpee all over my new car. Well my sister cleaned most of it up but the red stains still remain on the floor!!!
I tried Prestone carpet remover, tide, regular shampoo, that crappy scunci steamer (which dont get on how badly that thing sucks), warm water, but nothing is getting to it. I went out and bought a new carpet cleaner, but I think its morely for home carpets and the brushes don't reach too good on the hard to get areas.
Now can anyone tell me what else to do!! Please don't tell me I am out of luck
Thank you
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Mix OxiClean with very hot water--careful it will quickly foam up. Immediately use this solution with a nylon brush. Repeat if required.
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"Hot water"? Hmm. Isn't that foam oxygen being driven out by the heat? If so, isn't that the same oxygen needed to oxidize the stain. In treating this stain, what would be the role of the heat?
Attention: O.P. Red dye #X is a pain in the neck for carpet cleaners. Fortunately there are several professional products designed specifically to unlock the bond red dyes form. Your local auto detailers might even sell a bit to you. Custodial supply houses typically have such products. Of course, this is just in cases the OxyClean doesn't work.
:-) Cherry--yum yum! ________________________ Experience is something you don't get--until just after you need it.
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On Sun, 23 Jul 2006 08:29:06 -0400, Michael A. Ball

Exactly, that's why immediate use is recommended. The heated water is needed to dissolve the OxiClean, release the oxygen, and react with the stain. Cold water won't work as well because it will hold the oxygen. My second idea is to use a color-safe bleach such as Clorox II. With either method there is a risk of removing the carpet dye. Sunlight is good at bleaching out color, especially red.
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Phisherman wrote:

Using oxiclean and chlorine bleach in the same water will produce lots of oxygen bubbles, but those bubbles won't bleach. Hot water seems to release the peroxide in the oxiclean, and the peroxide bleaches. A warm iron can heat carpet to help oxiclean work faster.
Rubbing alcohol can help remove red food coloring, at least when the spill is fresh.
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Try Simple Green, full strength.
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i did some research and found that everyone recommends this stuff....
http://www.baneclene.com/catalog/redrelief.html
red dye is particularly NASTY and using any of the DIY suggestions (Goop included)... you run the risk of damaging the dye just enough to set it for life.
you need something SERIOUS for a serious stain.
i also suggest... that you never left your sister drive your car again.
actually, make her drive it to a PRO and have her pay for it?
why... would you give a fit-prone kid a frozen disaster. they ARE tasty.. i mean, i GET that.
i'd go red relief or pro.
get some Goop, though. ;)
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Debbie Keith
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75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:

(goop)
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Debbie Keith
2002 Daytona
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