How much to pay teenage house cleaner?

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We are in need of a maid / house cleaner for monthly cleanings, and my neighbor's teenage daughter is interested in doing it.
What's the going hourly rate for a teenage girl to do basic house cleaning? I don't want to overpay, but I definately want her to get enough, because I don't want her to quit and have to hire an impersonal cleaning service.
Thanks
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cleaning?
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Find out what an impersonal cleaning service would charge and pay her that amount. I think people should be paid based on the quality of work they do, not their age, gender, or any other characteristic.
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<< Find out what an impersonal cleaning service would charge and pay her that amount. I think people should be paid based on the quality of work they do, not their age, gender, or any other characteristic. >>
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Huh? Don't you think an impersonal cleaning service would be more skilled at cleaning a house? Would you see this in rec.auto.body.repair?
We are in need of an autobody person for body work, and my neighbor's teenage son is interested in doing it.
What's the going hourly rate for a teenage boy to do basic auto body work?
I don't want to overpay, but I definately want him to get enough, because I don't want him to quit and have to pay a professional auto body shop.
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On 04 Oct 2003 14:21:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comic (TOM KAN PA) wrote:

Not necessarily. A cleaning service would hire independent contractors and pay them around $7 an hour, though.
Nan
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See "Nickled & Dimed; On (Not) Getting By in America" by Barbara Ehrenreich. Maid/cleaning services pay workers minimum wage or very slightly above. And "skilled" isn't in the job description.
For the OP, what's it worth to you? What would *you* ask to be paid for the service? Are you willing to spend time training the neighbor's kid in exactly what you expect and how to do it? The best estimate would be to do everything you want done, clock the time it takes, and pay *at least* minimum wage for that time period.
Unless you make it clear (and have a good understanding yourself) *precisely* what's expected, you will be disappointed.
Your neighbor's kid won't have the added expense of travel or (I presume) bringing her own supplies, so minimum wage should be a starting point. If you mean to include laundry, pet care, window & woodwork washing, etc., I'd buck that minimum up a bit.
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that
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at
Why would I? If you hire someone to clean your house and they do a good job then they deserve the going wage. If their work doesn't meet your expectations then you need to talk with them. If you don't expect a good job and you are going to pay them a fraction of the going wage then I think you need to explain that to them up front. (But why bother hiring someone who you don't think will be thorough?) The key to success in such cases is having a clear set of expectation and communicating them to the person doing the job.
I had a college student who cleaned my home and office. She was very thorough. I have had to fire "impersonal cleaning services" because they didn't do a good job. In one case they broke several things, constantly set off the alarm system, locked themselves out of the house, and locked the dog in the basement. Another firm that touted themselves as "restoration specialists" accidentally sprayed oven cleaner on my kitchen cabinets and ruined the finish and dulled the lacquer finish on the cornice of my china cabinet. I had to take legal action to recover from their "professional" services. Cleaning services range from very professional and thorough to a person with a station wagon, some rags, and bottle of Windex. The best residential cleaning service that I used was Merry Maids. The very best job was done by the college student. I don't see why a teenager couldn't clean as well as a 40 year old, especially if you told them what you expected them to do. In the case of Merry Maids, they had a room-by-room list of tasks and a weekly, bi-weekly, and monthly schedule of what they would do. They left the check-off list after each session. You have to decide who is going to supply the tools and cleaning agents, when they are going to arrive, and how disputes are going to be handled. For instance, if the person didn't clean something to your expectations then how are you going to resolve the matter? It is far better to decide this up-front than to stew over it for a month.
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that
do,
at
teenage
How much skill does it take to do basic house cleaning ?
I know of a man that installs carpets and he has a son that was 19 at the time this hapened. He sent his son to install some in a house in the country club area. The woman sent him away because he was not ole enough. After she asked some of the other women in the area who did their carpets she found out the boy had done many of them and they were very nice. She called the caprpet man and wnated the boy back and he answered the boy was only 2 weeks older and he did not think that was old enough to send back to her.
I don't know about body work, but some of the teenage boys I knew when growing up could repair the mechanical parts of a car beter than most dealerships could.
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I'm with calling the cleaning services to find out their rates and paying your neighbor a comparable amount.
Nan
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How bout finding out what the company would charge and then split the difference?....After all the teenager does not have any insurance etc in case of breakage/theft whatever....
Win win for both..
Mango
wrote:

cleaning?
I
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wrote:

I would think the neighbor's daughter would be much more careful. The "professional" person/company may not be careful because they figure they're covered.
Afaic, it all boils down to whether the OP wants some "impersonal" stranger wandering around inside their home, or a close neighbor. I'd choose the neighbor, and pay well enough to ensure a decent job.
Nan

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wrote:]

How much the pay is has little relationship to the quality of the job. I do agree with paying fairly, but I do not think you always get more by paying more. In some cases, you might even get less.
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On Sun, 05 Oct 2003 06:48:47 -0400, The Other Harry

I disagree. If a person is paid well, they will likely be more apt to do a better job.
Nan
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Frankly, your attitude sounds un-American.
My country club used to have a greenskeeper who had been a Marine in WWII. During the Vietnam War, he hired an ex-Marine who had come back from Vietnam. A few weeks later, he reported that in 30 years, he had never before seen anyone mow the greens in less than four hours, but this veteran always finished in less than two. He asked to give him a raise above the minimum wage.
We said no. After all, a Vietnam veteran was lucky to have any job at all. He proved us right by continuing to work as hard as ever.
Americans are paid acording to their needs and obligations, such as country-club dues. If we were paid according to how hard we worked, there would be no money for country clubs, and veterans would have no jobs mowing grass. That would be un-American.
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[On Sun, 05 Oct 2003 13:32:27 -0400, Barbecue Bob

My experience has always been that someone who works hard by nature will work hard at any job they accept. They might not accept the job, and I do think there is an obligation to pay them fairly -- but I have never gotten any more work out of someone by giving them a pay increase. I give them a pay increase as a sign of my appreciation for their work and because I want them to continue to work for me. Assuming the work is good, I usually pay a bit more than I've promised.
If you want something to get done, give it to an ex-marine. The job *will* get done.
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On Sun, 05 Oct 2003 16:57:01 -0400, The Other Harry

Hahahaha!!! Yeah, sure. My hubby is an ex-marine. The reason things end up getting done is because I start pushing him.
Nan
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wrote:]

Yes. but...
You are married to him. If I hired him to pull a stump, the stump would be gone. He might well destroy my house in the process, but there would be no more stump.
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On Sun, 05 Oct 2003 19:06:21 -0400, The Other Harry

Yes. but... That would hold true of most people you'd hire to do a job. That one may be an ex-marine has little bearing on that, imo.
Nan
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The Other Harry is right.
When you pay too much, you tend to create a fat and lazy employee that feels that (whatever their sex) deserves even more. Underpayment is bad, but overpayment causes you to loose in the wallet, and in performance.

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Homeowner's insurance should cover things that people break or steal from your home. The neighbor's insurance probably also covers things that the girl would break or steal.
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Don't agree. A "cleaning service" makes money by organizing and delivering workers. Some highly reputable ones even manage benefits, social security payments, taxes, etc. The going rate they *charge* may be far more than an individual worker receives. Cleaning involves more work than, say, casual baby-sitting. The most ethical solution would be to offer minimum wage and do the SSI/tax paperwork and payments. Many of these jobs, however, are "off the book," and more or less just direct cash payment. Still not a reason to exploit the worker. Something *between* minimum wage and what a cleaning "service" charges would be reasonably fair.
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