Steel & Stucco

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Made me think of the ol' flour and wetspot joke... ugh...

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Thanks, Everyone!
I'm just a poor architect and will leave structural design and detailing to the engineers. I'm interested in facade detailing for water intrusion movement, and the like. I'm trying to become familiar with some of the techniques and materials now in use
Since everyone is so responsive, the project is a set of six apartments, two to a level above parking. A very inefficient arrangement arrived at by non technical folk and negotiated with local zoning authority. Project is in Charleston South Carolina area with sub tropical climate, hurricanes and earthquakes.
Thanks again to all. TB
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In a previous post says...

TB:
I know of an engineer in North Carolina who is familiar with steel stud construction. If you are interested in talking to him send me a message directly (off list) and I will send his contact info.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
  Click to see the full signature.
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a steel structural systems is usually beams and columns...where the lateral forces are resisted by moment connections and diagonal bracing...the spans of steel decking is 5' to 15'....beams from 15' to 60' and plate girder 40' to 100'...the steel deck rest on stringer..and stringer on floor beam and floor beam on girder...a rectangular grid in side the building with irregular facada is the main component...where the rectangular grid meets the irregular facada is filled with short beams to form the irregualar shape...all u have to do is set the span of the bays for the rectangular grid...and leaves the rest to the structural engineer and steel detailing guys...

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This kind of construction is not unreasonable. In some areas light gage construction is being use quite a bit. The basic design is similar to wood stud structure i.e. where you have light gage studs, sill and header tracks, light gage joists that can be used to frame floors and roofs, you can have light gage steel roof trusses, you have light gage beams and lintels. Light gage studs can be used for bearing walls and walls that are not bearing. For floors you can use plywood sheathing attached to the light gage joists and if connected correctly can serve as a diaphragm to resist lateral forces. Similarly you can use plywood on the exterior which can be used as a shear wall also to resist lateral forces. In other areas where shear walls are not needed you can add gypsum sheathing as substrate for the lath and stucco finish. Intermittently you can use structural steel tubes ( HSS tubes ) where special beams and columns are required. For diaphragm and shear wall values for lateral forces you can contact the APA ( American Plywood Association ) where they have been testing plywood shear walls on light gage steel structures.
Foundations are concrete with stem walls around the perimeter that receive the steel stud tracks. You can have slab on grade for the first level or you can provide a crawl space similar to wood construction.
Architecturally, door frames, window frames and architectural detail components are similar to buildings that have different structural systems but the interior walls are light gage studs that have door and window frames. The only thing that will be necessary on the exterior is insulation, flashing and waterproofing. And with stucco don't forget control joints.
I also suggest that a local structural engineer be involved in the project. In as much it is similar to wood construction building departments don't accept them as typical construction and the lateral force system provided is designed correctly.
To find light gage manufacturers all you need to do is go to Google.com and type light gage construction/studs/systems ( or something similar ) and you will get lots of manufacturers of light gage framing members. Catalogs are available.
Hope this helps.
________________________________________________________ Charles I. Dinsmore, PE SE RA ~ chuck snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com

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