Hurricane-proof House

Page 3 of 8  


House built into the side of a mountain that is above sea level. ~ preferably in a lesser earthquake zone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Versus the mountains that are below sea-level????????????????????
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris wrote:

While the wording *is* a bit ambiguous, I think he probably meant, not at the bottom of a mountain, whose base is at sea level. <g>
Notan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Too dangerous... subs run into them...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"survived" Katrina noting the obvious problems with windows being blown out and the roof of the Superdome falling apart.
The dumb decicions would be the placement of critical facilities at the ground (flooding level), for locating emergency generators, electrical rooms, HVAC, etc. It would seem that if these were located at higher floors to begin with, coupled with larger emergency water tanks and fuel supplies, and perhaps a 2 week pre-placed food supply, that these buildings would make nice shelters against future hurricanes (even cat. 5).
Elsewhere in the city, critical cellular and municipal communications towers should have been hardened for maximum strength and have all generators and ground facilities elevated above the flooding level.
Beachcomber
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Here's a turn-key design, courtesy of Uncle Sam: https://www.cheyennemountain.af.mil/thedesign.htm
Lee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That *might* keep out the thug looters in Nawlins.
wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

underwater at least a month out of the year. The entrance, power, water, etc. all came in from up the hill. The waste was pumped out to a holding tank that was emptied regularly.
It was a comfortable house too. No idea how it was constructed. I was a little young at the time or I would have inquired.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

(in my best Python voice) " I would find it and fart in it!"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CWatters wrote:

Yep, that would be a great place to be when the flood waters came in. Unless, of course, your underground house is a buried submarine. :-)
Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Considering that no type of house is ever going to be absolutely safe, one might also plan for the type of statement you want made in your afterlife. http://www.pulse24.com/Business/Top_Story/20050909-002/page.asp
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nehmo wrote:

Easy answer. Just build it in Antarctica. It has not had a hurricane in millions of years.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Saw a show once about Antarctica. They came across a dead seal, looked like it died yesterday. Narrator mentioned that it had died 300 years ago. Wonder if the meat was still good?
--
Chris

If you can read this, thank a teacher. If it is in English, thank a
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris wrote:

How did the narrator know that?
-Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not sure, I suppose you could ask him. As I remember he was as scientist stationed down there. Good enough for me. My guess would be carbon dating.
--
Chris

If you can read this, thank a teacher. If it is in English, thank a
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Easy, he counted the rings. ;-)

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It isn't that they aren't there - they do exist in certain crevices in rock faces and survive in tiny microclimates. Since they aren't too mobile, your dead seal on a beach can last a long time.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BETTER answer.... Just build it in Canada...we have plenty of flood planes for the moronic and a well established reputation for helping our neighbours as opposed to using high powered fire arms to solve all our problems.
Regards,
Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nehmo wrote:

Some places to start:
1: The buildings at the top of Mount Washington are a good example to follow for wind resistance. They withstood a storm in which gusts topped 230mph, the highest winds ever recorded. Worth a look if you want a house that'll handle any winds Mother Nature might blow its way.
2: The dutch have designed well for slow rising water. They've built houses that float. Not house boats, mind you. These homes have floating concrete foundations that will rise and fall with rising water levels. (I knew that thesis I heard of where a stoner physics student designd and floated a concrete boat and got credit for it would have some use somewhere, but I digress).
An idea I had was a house with a two story garage and an amphibian car in it. Living area on the second floor. When slow rising water comes, the car/boat rises up, and I can go out of my house like I normally would, climb into my car/boat, and drive off.
3: Storm surge is already designed for in many parts of the Gulf Coast. Houses are up on stilts, as many of our Florida contingent here on alt.architecture can explain.
4: As for unwanted government and looter home invasion, the best defense is you. Your eyes and ears, a video camera, and a gun. If you design your home to physically withstand the worst storms, it logically follows that you should be able to stay there safely during the worst storms, and the best defense against looters is a physical presence and a gun; the best defense against government is a video camera.
A house that's a veritable fortress against intruders wouldn't be pleasant to live during the 99.9% of the time when there's not a hurricane pummelling it or looters attacking it. That's my view anyway.
5: Another thing to think about is plumbing. Namely, when the power goes out, the water will as well. I've seen and smelled a toilet that's been full and not flushed for 2 weeks straight; you -do not- want that in your house.
Some auxiliary toilet, an out house even, that doesn't rely on running water is certainly in-order for a hurricane proof house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.