Why no 3-wheel bandsaws?

On 13 Jan 2004 20:36:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

big 3 wheelers have a big footprint. they have to have a much stiffer frame. the tighter radius is hard on the blades.
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replying to Bridger, William Falberg wrote: In most cases it's the blade guide adjustment that causes blade fatigue. When the guide rollers are pressing on the blade at great speed under typically high blade tension they are, for all purposes, going around a much smaller radius.
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On 11/12/2017 6:44 PM, William Falberg wrote:

Its the tight small radius that the band has to make that causes the band to fail.
All the manufacturers realized this and stopped manufacturing them.
--
Jeff

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replying to woodchucker, William Falberg wrote: All the manufacturers realized this and stopped manufacturing them. Stopped making"them"? The blades, or the three-wheelers?> The wheel radius or the cut radiuses? You're not clear on terminology.
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William, you'd do better to use google groups directly rather than using the home moaners hub website as an interface to USENET. It would make it easier for you to quote the article you are responding to using idiomatic USENET quoting.

No manufacturer currently sells a homeowner-grade three-wheel bandsaw.
Because the wheels are typically much smaller than those in a two-wheel saw, the blade is subject to extra stress on the blade weld, which causes premature failure. Tracking is another problem endemic to three-wheelers.
Unless you can find one of these:
http://www.northfieldwoodworking.com/bandsaws/50throat.htm
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On Wed, 15 Nov 2017 16:28:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Why would I want a 3-wheel BS except for the throat depth? It seems that they are a solution to a problem that has better solutions.
--
Jerry

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Jerry Osage writes:

I think you've already described the reason they exist.
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On 11/16/2017 2:03 PM, Jerry Osage wrote:

They tend to be shorter, easier to use on top of a bench top.
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William Falberg scrivere:

3 wheeld ban sawz are teh ghey.
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On 11/15/2017 10:14 AM, William Falberg wrote:

The wheel radius is the problem, the blade has to bend too much around the 3 smaller wheels and the blades prematurely fail as a result.
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I have both, though the 3 wheeler is for sale. The 3 wheeler goes through blades faster, due to stress of smaller diameter wheels and thinner baldes but has always tracked OK,even after 16 years of (ab)use... 2 wheelers are cheaper to manufacture. Less parts, easier to manufacture as 3rd idler wheel isn't there. The 3 wheelers are usually 'benchtop' units,semi portable while 2 wheelers are floor mounted beasts. hth jay
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On 13 Jan 2004 20:36:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

There are decent three wheelers around, but not many. If you see something like an Inca close up, it's huge.
One of the advantages of a two-wheel bandsaw is that it takes up very little workshop space relative to its capacity, being neatly arranged in a vertical stack. -- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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I have one of the older 16" Delta 28-560. It is a well built, sturdy saw that works great for small projects. It requires thinner (018" -.020") blades as well as a 1/2" max blade width. As a result the saw does not resaw very well. Most sawdust encrusted people need a saw that does both.
I really like having them both. The Delta with a 1/8" blade for quick and sharp corners and my new (very happy with) 16" Jet with a 1" resaw blade.
As compared to the standard 14" two wheeler, the 28-560 is built heavier than current models and I'm sure it, by today's standard, would cost as much or more to manufacture.
If you have room, find one and enjoy.
Dave
(Hylourgos) wrote:

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Grizzly makes a small one
http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G8976

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Why would you want to have 3 wheels when 2 will do?
Try COST being the determining factor.

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Willy Wanka wrote:

You can have a deeper throat, and it can sit on a bench. http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G8976
-- Mark
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replying to Willy Wanka, William Falberg wrote: Three wheels allows for wider throat width, a vital attribute for scrolling.
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My father had one... for about a day, please don't make me think about it.=) I can't remember who it was made by, likely Trademaster, smaller bench top size. The blade was a pain to set up, just when we thought it was ready to go, it would come off one of the wheels. Maybe it was ignorance, maybe a problem with the machine, bad design could is an option, you do get what you pay for, but that just can't justify everything. All I know is that he replaced it with a 14" 2 wheel and hasn't looked back.
HTH, Jeffo
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Jeffo wrote:

I started with a Black/Decker 3 wheel bandsaw years ago. I broke a blade almost every time I used it. I also burned up many moters. I always took it back to the store and they gave me a new one. I finally got tired buying new blades. They usually broke at the solder joint. I guess heat and bending caused this. My Delta 14" has never caused me a problem and has never broken a blade. My 2 cents!! Chuck B.
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It has alot to do with traction.....you don't get as much with less blade contact on three wheel saws as with 2 wheel saws. I bought an Amada saw once that could cut 36" thick steel 12 foot long on a power feed table, The capacity was an issue at the time. I asked about three wheel saws and the Amada people explained about blade traction and blade life.
The saw took a blade 1/8" x 2 5/8" x 19' 11"
John
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