plastic hf toolboxes

anyone tried any of the plastic hf toolboxes
uv stability is important and is disappointing to discover down the road to be not as advertised
maybe i should just use some natural material and make one
hmm maybe wood but usually the wood toolbox is heavier than the plastic ones
as always there are tradeofsf
lightweight and uv stability matters
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09:27:49 -0700 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    One option is paint.
    Or just budget for another cheap replacement down the road.
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pyotr filipivich
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 18:33:30 -0700

good idea maybe even a uv stable clear coat would do but even that can backfire as some plastics will not take a finish

depends on the recipient and the use
better for it to last long and not need frequent replacement
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On Thursday, May 3, 2018 at 12:07:02 PM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

Yeah. Maybe they'll want to use it as a jewelry box.

Yeah. Like a well made game board.
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09:06:30 -0700 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Then don't get that model.

    Like shoes - you can buy a pair at Walmart for 17.88 and replace them in four months. Or you can buy a better pair for $35 and replace them in a year. (Or, buy two pair, alternate them daily, and replace them in a year and four months)     Also, as a friend who was making backpacks pointed out: the army bought a set of his, then tested them. They lasted 3 months. That is "three months of constant daily hard usage in the field." Most people are hard pressed to put any of their camping gear to use "in the field" for 90 days. (That's 13 weeks of camping trips, at two weeks the year, nope, your tent did not last "6 years", but 12 weeks spread out over 6 years.)          So, you can buy a cheap plastic toolbox, and keep it out of the sun, and it will last a "long" time. Or buy a better but UV resistant plastic one, keep it out of the sun and it will last even longer.     Or get a non-plastic one - if you can find one.     
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On Thu, 03 May 2018 17:06:19 -0700, pyotr filipivich
EC = Eeyore
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wrote:

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On Thu, 03 May 2018 17:06:19 -0700, pyotr filipivich

Or, you can pay $150 and be able to actually walk for a year. I can't imagine a <$20 pair of shoes even fitting on my dogs.
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snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com on Thu, 03 May 2018 22:41:25 -0400 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    I shelled out for two pairs of Durashocks, alternated them, they lasted years.     Then the day I needed gym shoes - walmart had them for 17.88. As I wear them for at most two hours three times a week - they are "lasting" a long time.

    It's a "sermon illustration".
    The reality is- if you buy two pair of shoes and alternate them, they will last longer than if you buy one pair, wear them till they 'die', and then buy a second pair.
    Sometimes, your choice is: something cheap - now, or something more expensive later. (e.g., Harbor Freight or Snap-On)
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On Thursday, May 3, 2018 at 10:53:01 PM UTC-4, pyotr filipivich wrote:

What your definition of "last longer"? Is it based on time or usage?
They won't last any longer based on usage. They'll both wear out after the same number of steps, all else being equal. Alternate them or not, you'll double the number of steps compared to having only one pair, but neither one lasted "longer" from a usage perspective.
The real advantages of buying 2 pairs are the cost (because of inflation) and the guarantee that that that exact shoe will be "available" for longer than it might be otherwise.
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(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Just what I said - if you alternate the use of a pair of shoes, those who shoes will last longer than if you bought 1 pair, wore them daily, and then bought a second pair and wore it daily. You will get more "steps per shoe" than if you wore the same pair every day.     I'm also remembering that the US Army figures a pair of combat boots, in combat, last something like 6 weeks, but a pair "in garrison" will last for over a year.

    Apparently, if you let a pair of shoes dry out (by wearing them every other day) they last longer than if you wear them every day. Thus, two pair of shoes, alternated, will get more steps per shoe, than if you wear them day after day.

    Tell me about it. When I went to replace those Durashocks they were "New and Improved"; meaning that the size I'd worn - no longer fit.
    Fnord - don't get me started on the things I wish I could still get.
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On 5/4/18 5:59 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

There's a running shoe I love (I don't jog). Last time I found them on sale, I bought 2 pairs for that very reason. I don't want to try to find them again when I need a new pair, only to find that they changed something or don't make them anymore.
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On Fri, 4 May 2018 03:59:13 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Not really. Alternating shoes will allow them to dry completely, between wearings.
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On Friday, May 4, 2018 at 7:44:35 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Not counting walking through puddles, how long does it take for a pair of shoes to dry out after a "normal" wearing session?
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On Fri, 4 May 2018 17:48:20 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

It depends on a lot of factors but it does take a while. There isn't a lot of air flow inside a shoe.
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On Friday, May 4, 2018 at 10:40:43 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

"A while" doesn't help move the discussion forward.
When I was project manager for a Fortune 500 company, I learned very quickly that "not too long", "not much", "fairly soon", etc. were not answers that were going to move your career along. People can't make decisions or plan budgets with nebulous answers like that.
If "a while" means it takes 18 hours for a pair of work shoes to dry, then maybe a person shouldn't wear them 2 days in a row. However, if "a while" is 8 - 10 hours, then they'll most likely be dry by the time you need them the next day.
How long is "a while" when it come to shoes drying?
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(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    What is the ambient relative humidity, air temperature and air flow in the house, and specifically where the shoes are? Are they low cut shoes you can pull the tongue out to improve airflow, or boots which you pull on and reach up to your knee? Do your feet sweat a lot, a little? How wet were your socks when you took your footgear off?     Without answers to those questions, "a while" is as good an answer as you can get.     
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On Fri, 4 May 2018 20:13:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

"Day". Is that better?

Were you going to pay me for my answer? OK, I'll set up an experiment.

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Well, that would depend on the ambient humidity.
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On Sun, 06 May 2018 16:42:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

How wet the shoes are, the amount of padding in the shoes, the size/shape of the shoe, wind (direction and speed), and probably a dozen other variables.
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