looks wrong


https://www.harborfreight.com/saw-mill-with-301cc-gas-engine-62366.html
nothing visible holding the material
for that material a beam saw with the right blade would be faster and give a much cleaner cut
max capacity is 20 inch log but it does not look like it could do that maybe that plate in the throat moves up and down
that just needs a trailer to be complete otherwise there would be a need to make sure it is level
maybe if it was on a concrete slab
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08:51:35 -0700 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    And you can haul said beam saw out into the woods?

    Yep.

    Doesn't need to be "level" - the saw unit rides on the rails. If you're daring enough, you could mount it nearly vertical.

    Then it would not be portable
    This is an up scaled rough lumber saw. Bigger & more elaborate than an "Alaskan Mill" using a chain saw. "Perfect" if you want beams or planks for construction at a "remote site, where trucking finished lumber in is more work than it is worth.
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pyotr filipivich
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On Fri, 06 Jul 2018 09:30:58 snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com wrote:

can you haul this saw into the woods

yeah sure

chainsaw probably be the better choice out in the wood since bandsaws are not as portable
look at the cnc chainsaws used in the clt industry
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09:58:39 -0700 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Depends on what you mean by "haul" and "into the woods.", right?

    What, now you're risk adverse? What ever happened to your sense of adventure?     {"It died under mysterious circumstances. My sense of self-preservation found the body, but assures me it has an airtight alibi."}

    This doesn't look like the sort of rig one could pack into a "remote" location. (I once was looking at property where directions concluded with "at end of gravel road, park and prepare for a five hour hike".)
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On 7/8/2018 2:56 PM, pyotr filipivich wrote: ...

If you can get a truck in of sufficient size to need a 20" portable mill, you can manage to trailer this bad body in there, too...back in VA (where there _were_ trees unlike SW KS :) ), there were a number of similar portable mills operating in some pretty difficult-to-get-to places. Of course, for real commercial stuff you needed something quite a bit bigger than 20" D, that's pretty small for an oak or the like.
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rec.woodworking the following:

    It all depends on what you consider "difficult" and the like.
    If you've heard of the Oso Mudslide in 2014, it took out the state highway - buried it deep under the mud for a long stretch. One of the responses was local logging companies throwing a road around the slide in a matter of days. Not pretty, but functional. Logging companies have been making practical roads for decades. Of course, once the Feds showed up, they wanted to bar log trucks from said road. They relented after the logging companies just parked their trucks and blocked access to what, after all, was the road the companies had built to handle log trucks.
    If you've seen the aerial photos after the slide, you'll notice a green "thumb" sticking into the middle of the gray. I've friends who live there. Most of the damage to their property was from the "aid" people afterwards. "As much as you'd like to, you can't just start shooting people."
    Anyway - to paraphrase a real estate slogan "difficult for what, difficult for whom?"
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 08:51:35 -0700, Electric Comet

I would be carefully comparing it to the other portable bandsaws on the market - this one looks like it has a flimsy frame - hard to tell from the photo .. These units take a beating, in the field - big heavy logs and timbers being loaded with tractor or bobcat .. you do not want to bend or kink or bow the frame when it is also the track ! John T.
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On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 11:41:03 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

When I win the lottery, I'm buying this:
https://www.hud-son.com/product/hfe-21-homesteader-sawmill/
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21 inch max. log diameter 6.5 HP engine ? You'll probably be trading it for a larger unit - why not start out with the bigger one ? Especially after the Lotto win ! :-) Old buddy had a 30 inch with a < 13 hp ? > Honda - - Silva-Saw brand - served him well - cutting for a lot of farmers over many years, as a part-time retirement business. John T.
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On Fri, 06 Jul 2018 12:43:35 snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

they compare to another brand which has much beefier cross members and more room for loader forks which lists for 2900 but could probably get for similar price as hf or with some patience much less as used
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 08:51:35 -0700, Electric Comet

You mean besides gravity?

So can you get such a saw for that price that can handle a 20 inch width?

Doesn't say it can cut one in half. It's clearly intended for turning logs into rough lumber.

Or a wood floor or any other level surface.

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On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 11:51:40 AM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

Level is not the main concern and may not even be deisrable.
From: http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Leveling_your_mill.html
"When calibrating the surface of your bed, using a 4' level is a good tool. However, a 4' level will not show a camber or twist in your bed. However slight they may be, they will affect the final quality of your lumber. If there is even a slight twist in your bed, as the carriage travels over that twist, you will be sawing that twist in your cant. Then, when you turn your cant 180 degrees, that twist is compounded to the other side of the cant. This will give you uneven lumber, and you may tear your hair out trying to figure out why. A camber will do basically the same thing. The best tool to use is a transit if your bed is 18' or longer to make sure your setup is correct. We hold our bed tolerance to +/- .060" all around. We then check the location of the blade to the bed at every cross member to maintain consistency. You may also have bridging rods under your bed. By tightening or loosening them, they will cause or cure camber and twist as well. A flat bed makes a big difference!"
Some folks at that site don't want it level. They lean the rig down hill 'cuz they've heard of gravity.
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(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    I worked as a machinist for a while. Relevant to this discussion is the difference between "flat" and "level". In short, you have a "box" N units high in which the line/surface has to be, in order to be flat. If said box is also perpendicular to gravity, then your "flat" surface is also "level".     So in this case, I want those rails "flat" (I.e., inside a 1/8 high "box") more than I care for "level". Although there probably is a degree of levelness which is more ideal than others.
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https://www.youtube.com/embed/gn4li_PFNf4?autoplay=1&start
&rel=0
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 18:39:13 snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net wrote:

love to see the hf setup utilizing gravity with that material
the saw chasing the wood
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On Sunday, July 8, 2018 at 12:50:28 PM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

They've also heard of friction...and stops.
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build it on unused commas and periods and you will be ok

https://www.youtube.com/embed/91uiGX2Ga4Y?autoplay=1&rel=0


https://www.youtube.com/embed/B9oEkl7mjRo?autoplay=1&rel=0

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On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 9:49:55 PM UTC-4, Spalted Walt wrote:

And I thought miter saws had lousy dust collection! ;-)
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On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 10:51:40 AM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

Given this has no hydraulics, this thing is going to work you to death.
But for $2,200 you can put in a bit of sweat.
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