Help: Phillips screw 1/2 inch from the wall

I'm trying to remove a triangle-shaped entertainment center installed in th e corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with small head, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight spaces ( going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no problem. Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me get the b it flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's not enou gh room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish, and I' ve had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to get it d one manually.
Any suggestions?
Thanks!
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On Thursday, July 5, 2018 at 8:07:53 PM UTC-4, Michael wrote:

the corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with small hea d, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight spaces (going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no problem . Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me get the bit flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's not en ough room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish, and I've had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to get it done manually.

By "remove" do you mean "Remove as one piece" or "Remove in any way possibl e, it's going the trash."?
If it's going in the trash, start breaking it into pieces until you have better access to that one last lonely cleat, hanging by itself on the wall.
Once that's all that is left, access to the offending screw will present itself in a multitude of ways.
Heck, if it's going the trash, cut around the screw (or cut the head off) with a multi-function tool, remove the unit and then deal with the screw later.
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On Thursday, July 5, 2018 at 8:07:53 PM UTC-4, Michael wrote:

the corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with small hea d, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight spaces (going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no problem . Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me get the bit flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's not en ough room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish, and I've had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to get it done manually.

As far as the offset screwdriver, I have had better luck with a miniature ratchet and quality Philips bit.
Something like one of these:
https://www.ebay.com/bhp/mini-ratchet
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On Thu, 5 Jul 2018 18:15:09 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Even better with a good 10 inch blade philips driver - the angle is so small then that it is not a problrm.
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On Thu, 5 Jul 2018 17:07:51 -0700 (PDT), Michael

Do you have a 3/8 socket set with a spring extension? Pick the socket that fits the phillips bit.
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On Thursday, July 5, 2018 at 8:24:53 PM UTC-5, Markem wrote:

Markem,
This was it! I bought a phillips head 3/8 socket and they came right out!
Mike
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On Thursday, July 5, 2018 at 8:07:53 PM UTC-4, Michael wrote:

if it's too close to the wall for the power driver, even a manual screwdriver is likely to need some tilt; so, use a screwdriver with a long (18 inch) shank. It might have some small angle, but so must the driver that put it into that corner.
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"Michael" wrote in message
I'm trying to remove a triangle-shaped entertainment center installed in the corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with small head, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight spaces (going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no problem. Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me get the bit flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's not enough room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish, and I've had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to get it done manually.
Any suggestions?
Thanks!
******************
1/4" drive - two modest length extensions and a universal joint in the middle. A good universal Not a crappy wore out floppy one. A wobble end extension might be enough, and won't flop like a wore out universal joint. 1/4" deep socket on the end with your driver in it. Needs to be deep to reduce flop. Need to have a longish bit driver so it sticks out enough. Use a small block or shim behind the extension to set the angle correctly from the wall. Use your finger tips to hold the angle correctly up and down. Use your drill driver to apply adequate forward pressure so the bit doesn't skip in the screw head. I've run across Phillips tips with serrations on the blade faces that can help with this, but in any case use a fresh new sharp driver tip.
This is one thing I might have done more of than some of these wood working pros. Turn screws. As a communications tech and licensed communications contractor I've had to turn a shit ton ** of screws in the last few decades. Often frozen in place and in odd locations with little or no clearance. (I retired from contracting the end of 2016. I think my licenses expired last month.)
** shit ton... kind of like a regular ton, but nastier.
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On 7/5/2018 7:07 PM, Michael wrote:

I have found that an impact river will remove stripped head Phillips screws.
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On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 12:49:38 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

n the corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with small h ead, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight spac es (going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no probl em. Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me get t he bit flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's not enough room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish, an d I've had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to get it done manually.

ws.
Sometimes. And sometimes the screw wins.
https://i.imgur.com/zU0PYrP.jpg
I just did that about an hour ago trying to remove those damn rotor screws that Honda uses.
The drill was much faster. ;-)
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On 7/6/18 6:26 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Take a nail set or metal drill center punch and a hammer to knock them out. Set the punch in one of the grooves and angle it so you can hit it with the hammer, counter-clockwise. I have found this to be the easiest way to remove them... oh, and never put them back in. They are only there for easier assembly in the factory.
Yeah, I know you already drilled them out, but for those listening in, that's how you do it.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Saturday, July 7, 2018 at 12:34:02 AM UTC-4, -MIKE- wrote:

in the corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with small head, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight sp aces (going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no pro blem. Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me get the bit flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's no t enough room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish, and I've had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to ge t it done manually.

crews.

ews

I've tried that method and it's been hit or miss (NPI) as has the impact driver method. Those screws are really soft and LOS and environment really make a difference.
Drilling never fails and the remaining shank *usually* spins right out with a pair of pliers.
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On 7/7/18 7:10 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

All true. And given that they are completely unnecessary, even if you messed up the threads in the hole, it wouldn't matter.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 7/6/2018 6:26 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The subject was about removing wood screws, not mechanical machine thread screws. You need impact rated bits for that application.
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On Sunday, July 8, 2018 at 10:32:23 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

in the corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with small head, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight sp aces (going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no pro blem. Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me get the bit flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's no t enough room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish, and I've had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to ge t it done manually.

crews.

ews

You mean like that broken bit which came with the impact driver?
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On 7/8/2018 12:24 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

No, like the ones in the stores specifically rated for impact duty.
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On Sunday, July 8, 2018 at 4:30:20 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

ed in the corner of the room. It is mounted using vertical cleats, with sma ll head, longish phillips screws about 1/2 inch from the wall and in tight spaces (going in sideways). If I had full access with my drill driver, no p roblem. Out in a second. But the diameter of my drill driver won't let me g et the bit flush with the screw. If I angle it, I'll strip it, and there's not enough room anyway. They are in there really good, and they are longish , and I've had no luck getting enough pressure on an offset screwdriver to get it done manually.

screws.

crews

Well, we've probably reach the "splitting of hairs" point in this discussio n, but that's OK. ;-)
All the bits that came with my impact driver begin with the letters CRV, as in Chrome Vanadium.
While more brittle than Chrome Molybdenum (and also cheaper) CR-V is technically "rated" for impact duty, just maybe not the best choice.
Since I now need to replace the #3 PH bit, I'll be looking for some CR-MO bits so as to avoid the (earth) shattering experience of yesterday ;-)
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On 7/8/2018 6:49 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Often the bits, blades, etc. that come with a tool are not the ones you would want to use. ;~(
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The subject was about removing stripped screws in wood.
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