If it slips, where's it gonna go?

http://www.woodbutcher.net/slips.shtml
I can't tell you how useful this little phrase has been. Any time I'm doing something that involves applying force, I take a second and ask myself this question. If my chisel slips, where's it going to go? If I have to let go, where's the piece of wood I'm cutting going to go? (Is anyone else's table saw height right under their belt? Ain't no way I'm standing in the line of fire!!!)
Puckdropper
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On 6/12/2018 5:23 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

IF is the first question you should ask in any situation where you or someone else's safety is involved.
If the tool slips........................ If the electricity goes off........................ If the house is on fire........................ If the car starts to slide........................ If an oncoming car comes across the center line........................
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On 6/12/2018 7:51 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

If the condom breaks.......................... If the husband comes home....................... If your mother walks into the room.....................
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If it slips, where's it gonna go?

If he slips, where's he gonna go?

She's not gonna slip, she'll probably flip!
Puckdropper
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If I get out of bed in the morning I might fall and break a hip..........
F orget E verything A nd R un
Life can be an incredible journey if you have the courage to live it without a head full of crippling fear.
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On Tuesday, June 12, 2018 at 7:52:00 AM UTC-4, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Good luck with #5.
For the most part, Items 1-4 are under your control and you get to decide what to do. With #5, you have no idea what the other driver is going to do once you make your decision as to how to avoid the collision. Will they go back where they belong right away but after you've made a move to avoid them? Will they keep drifting onto your side of the road, forcing you to go right, right, right until you are in the ditch? What will they do, what you will do, and how fast will this all happen at possibly 65 MPH?
There was a head-on collision near me this weekend but no one knows exactly what happened because both drivers are still in a coma. The 3rd person is dead.
All they know are these 2 things:
1 - The sedan with the passenger in it crossed the center line first. 2 - The oncoming SUV was straddling the center line when it tore through the *passenger* side of the sedan, killing the passenger.
As of now, they don't know why the driver of the SUV went left, instead of right. Did she see the at-fault driver going farther to her own left to avoid the SUV? Was there no other place for the SUV to go (somebody on the SUV's right?) Was it just a bad decision?
My point is that there are some situations where you can plan all you want but if you are not the only human involved, parts of that plan may go awry.
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On 6/12/2018 7:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The point of number 5 was you should always be considering your options. Yes as the collision is unfolding things will be changing.
However as you are driving you should always be aware of the berm, etc of the road you are driving. Is it a solid rock wall as on some mountain roads; Is it a drop off of several dozen feet; or is it a field you could go into to avoid the head on. Also you should always keep track of the cars on both sides and behind you. In a developing head on, it would be to your advantage to know where those cars was.
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On Tuesday, June 12, 2018 at 8:20:40 PM UTC-4, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

That sounds an awful lot like every day driving. ;-)
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On Tue, 12 Jun 2018 07:51:56 -0400, Keith Nuttle

Used that last one today. Unmarked police car, no lights, just siren, pulls around a car in the oncoming lane and expects everybody to get out of his way. Fortunately there was a place to go.
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On 6/12/2018 7:40 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

and you must obey the regulations about emergency vehicles.
However; sometimes they get so caught up in the activities they are engaging in, they forget other cars and their actions can actually cause wrecks.
Two examples: I have a 21' sailboat that I trailer. One afternoon I was coming home from the lake at the speed limit on a two lane road. Out of nowhere a police car appeared behind me, and quickly passed me. As soon as he was back in my lane, he immediately put on his brakes and started to turned left. This left me looking for a way to avoid hitting him in the rear, fortunately I missed him. If I had not, it would have been my fault if I hit him in the rear, but I was a large vehicle with a longer stopping distance so it gave me several very uncomfortable milliseconds.
I don't know how many times I have seen them stop a car and create a traffic hazard. There were several time the police stopped cars on 86th street in Indianapolis. Since there was no place to get off the road used, the right lane to write the ticket. I have seen accidents around these stopped cars as the traffic tries to avoid the hazard.
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On 6/12/2018 7:51 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Chain mesh gloves.

Battery powered head lamp.

Flame retardant suit

NASCAR crash helmet, seat restraints and steel crash cage.
If an oncoming car comes across the center line........................
Premade funeral urn.
--
Jack
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions.
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On 6/12/2018 4:23 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Line of fire.....I have use a TS for so long just about any where on the front side of the saw is in the line of fire.
BTW just how tall are you? LOL. The last time I had a close encounter I got hit about 2" above the belt, and I am 6' tall. On another occasion I got hit in the chest and the fence was between me and the work being cut.
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the

5'6". I realize most TS kickbacks go up, but the last one I had went straight off the table. That jagged spear flew through the packaging of an air fitting (not the fitting, the packaging) before stopping a good 8" beyond the packaging.
Puckdropper
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On Tuesday, June 12, 2018 at 4:23:38 AM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:

Great thought. I try to keep that kind of thing in mind. What can go wrong here? Where can I get injured here? But I like the question, if the tool slips, where is it going to go?
On a related note, last week, a piece of cedar flew back from my table saw and hit my safety glasses so hard I thought it broke them. I'm glad I wasn't lazy and wearing regular glasses.
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typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Ever since I got this scar (points to inside of left thumb) that thought has not been far from my mind.

--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On 6/12/2018 4:00 PM, pyotr filipivich wrote:

Scars are a good reminder to be safe.
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-0400 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    As a friend says "Experience is what tells you 'This is going to hurt - a lot!'" or "Now is the time to flinch!"
    Sigh. You see a bunch of guys standing round talking, and one is gesturing and the others have their hands tucked in their armpits or pockets - and it is not cold out - you know that story is going to end " and then he pulled back what was left..."
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On Tue, 12 Jun 2018 09:23:34 +0000, Puckdropper wrote:

That's pure gold, Puckdropper; thanks!
Cheers, Colin
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Colin Campbell wrote:

I find myself asking that question alot with phillips-head screw drivers..
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Why are your Phillips head screw drivers slipping?
Be absolutely certain you're using the right size Phillips screw driver. #2 is the most common size with #1 being the second most common. If you put a screw driver in a screw head and it moves side to side easily, you're using a screw driver that's too small.
Phillips screwdrivers also work best with force applied along the turning axis. Push in as you rotate the screw.
Puckdropper
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