Formica

snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not even close:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formica_%28plastic%29
Etymology of the name The mineral mica was commonly used at that time for electrical insulation. Because the new product acted as a substitute “for mica”, Faber used the name “Formica”
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On Wed, 25 Nov 2015 01:25:42 +0000, Spalted Walt

Regardless, on the Formica site it indicates all of their high pressure laminate products are postformable.
I had heard it was named Formica because unlike mineral mica insulation, it was "formable" mica insulation.. Looks like I was probably misinformed on that count.
My assertion that it was a melamine resin finish is however supported.
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On 11/24/2015 7:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm thinking post, after the fact, formable.
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wrote:

PostFormable laminate is flat laminate sheets that can be "post formed" into things like countertops with the anti-drip round edge, and the low back-splash like found on most kitchen and bath countertops, among many other things.. It is heathed and formed to shape and glued to a (usually manufactured lumber) substrrate.
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On 11/21/2015 10:16 AM, dpb wrote:

I last worked with plastic laminate on an airplane model display cabinet. The panels were 3/4" thick and covered on all 6 sides/edges including beveled edges. There were 8 main panels and 2 posts, so 58 separate glue ups on a project about half the size of a refrigerator. The job was very tedious.
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On 11/21/2015 2:18 AM, gray_wolf wrote:

Apply contact cement to the surface, of the substrate and formica, and wait for them to dry to the touch.
Then apply ... it will straigten out.
So seriously, I doubt rolling the other way will remove the set not without time. I think it has been that way for a while and you need heat (hot garage summer day ) to help. You might try your attic for a while after rolling it the other way.
If it's not ridiculous, use 1/4 or 3/8 ply to cover it while trying to apply it, the weight of it will keep the curl down while you work your hands underneath and apply it.
--
Jeff

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