Building Square Walls On New Construction Sill Plates

I have a use case where I want to build a wall on new construction. Inevitably, the foundation pours are not perfectly level. Over long runs, they can be off several inches. So, I want to build the wall to the sill plate with studs of different lengths to account for this so that the top of the wall *is* level. Because of the long horizontal runs involved, I want to keep the accuracy of the cuts to 1/16 or even 1/32 (to avoid accumulation error).
However, measuring and cutting long studs is slow and not that accurate with just a tape and a chop saw.
My instinct is to mount a laser distance finder on the left side of the chop saw blade aiming the laser to the right (I am right handed) and coming up with some kind of easily clamped/removed target that can be consistently placed on the right hand end of the board. That way, as the board is slid left and right, the laser would record the effective distance from blade to board end.
However, this would require the ability to dial in an offset into the laser distance tool to correct for the distance from the blade to the actual laser tool mount mount. IOW, the tool has to be calibrated for the "real" distance from blade to board end.
Questions:
1) Do distance finders allow offsets like that to be dialed in? 2) Is there a better/faster/smarter way to do this? 3) Is there already a tooling system for just this problem?
P.S. This question is actually on behalf of a friend of mine who is a professional builder. I first suggested mounting a long auxiliary fence on the right side of his chop saw (with proper support) and then sticking on a self-adhesive tape to the top of it. He said he's already doing this but it's too slow for large projects. You have to run back-and-forth from the end of the board to the blade to get it right. In some cases, he's using sticks up to 20' in length so it's a fair walk.
Ideas?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 09:19:45 -0500

your solution should be reconsidered as you are only kicking the can down the road
the can is full of worms
in other words make the footings level
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 08:19:42 -0700, Electric Comet

If the footing isn't level and the foundation isn't level and the sill plate isn't level the floors won't be level either. Level the top of the foundation. If the foundation pour isn't level, fire the cement contactor. If YOU poured the foundation, shame on you. Now you know why you should have hired the job out.
At this point, find the highest point of the foundation and see how much lower the rest of the foundation is and how much is low.
Or find the low point and see how much higher the rest is, and how much of it is higher.
Then determine if you are better to cut/grind the high points, fill in the low points, or use a combination strategy.. Get the sill plates level and square on the foundation BEFORE DOING ANYTHING ELSE.
I'd crib out the top of the foundation with lumber, carefully leveled, and fill it with high strength concrete, mixed with a bit of bondfast, then after stripping the cribbing, lag the sills down

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 03/17/2018 10:19 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Out of my control.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No it's not. The "footings" perhaps, but not the top of the foundation where the ledger board or sill sits.
No excuse whatsoever for not levelling the top of the foundation - as previously explained.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Mar 2018 13:17:20 -0500

are you the assigner of blame
if that too is out of your control you may want a plan to extricate yourself from who ever has control
later on someone will look for the one to blame
nothing may come of it except a name will stick to the shoddy work
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Knock 'em down and start over.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/2018 10:34 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Exactly! A professional builder should know better to accept poor workmanship.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 03/17/2018 10:34 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

That's a nice theory but the real world does not operate that way.
In this case, the location is very remote and you get what you get.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No, when the world gives you lemons, make lemonade. Takes abit of work, but NO EXCUSE for not starting witha levelled foundation.
Cut it, shim it - do whatever is necessary - but build FROM A SQUARE FOUNDATION.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Concrete saw suspended from a level I-beam and pulled along it just like a RAS to nibble the foundation mostly flat?!
Puckdropper
--
http://www.puckdroppersplace.us/rec.woodworking
A mini archive of some of rec.woodworking's best and worst!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/18 4:25 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:

My suggestion was an easy way to deal with it. But your comment gave me another idea.
You could run a tight string line or laser, level, from the highest point of the foundation wall to a clamped stick at the low end. You take a pressure treated sill plate and embed it in mortar on the sloping foundation wall. You just keep tapping down until it's straight and level. Let the mortar cure and then insert anchors down into the foundation wall. The anchors could already be there or be installed prior to setting the sill plate in mortar.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'd use concrete, not mortar, for the structural strength
I guess a "portland cement mortar" would work. - (Type "S" - not T"ype N"
DO NOT try it with type N motar - it is too weak in compressive strength.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/18 8:13 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:

I don't work with it enough to know, off hand, which is proper. In any case, it would be a good idea to use fiberglass impregnation or a reinforcing mesh.
I still think my first suggestion is the easiest, fastest method and yields perfect results above the foundation wall. It's not all that different from building a stud wall on a stepped foundation.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/2018 5:40 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

That seems plausible but I'm thinking that the sill plate may prematurely rot being embedded in mortar. Maybe not. down here in the Houston area the sill plate does not sit directly on top of the foundation, there is an water proof barrier between the wood and the concrete. I would imagine mortar and wicking might be worse.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/18/18 1:06 AM, Leon wrote:

I can't draw up step by step instructions for the guy! :-P
I have to assume this professional framer would know to use ground-contact PT wood and/or use a sill seal under the wood sill plate.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

+1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/17/2018 1:17 PM, Tim Daneliuk wrote:

Um, yes it does. I don't believe a foundation should deviate nearly as much as what your neighbor is stuck with. My parents 40 year old home had a foundation deviation of about 1" from the front back 65' to the back.

That makes no sense at all. So the problem is he could not afford or chose not to have some one come in that knows how to do it correctly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, March 18, 2018 at 2:00:19 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

That was exactly my point. He continues to claim that the remote location had something to do with fact the foundations are continually poured poorly, yet when pressed for a reason, he doesn't have one.
Seems to me that the root cause needs to be addressed as opposed to trying to come up with workarounds. I'm not so rigid that I'm unwilling to accept that there is a reason that pours can't be done correctly. There *has* to be a reason. If the root cause can be eliminated in a reasonable manner, then it should be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/18/2018 1:00 AM, Leon wrote:

I keep wondering where's the GC or foreman to ensure the forms are level _before_ the pour (or more usefully after layout) and who the end customer is who's willing to ante up for inferior work routinely?
It's pretty rural here and there's no such thing as not expecting quality workmanship, even on footings for barns, tool or hay sheds, or the like; what more actual framed construction.
Makes no sense to me either to just have this as a routine problem; how much does it take to run a level and build forms between points, anyways???
Like once if asked to frame in a homeowner self-contracted place once, well, ok, but routinely for a large volume production builder???? No way that makes any sense at all no matter where it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.