Band saws

I have an older bench top Sears band saw. I use it for quick cuts. I don't use it often.
Since it sit unused for several weeks at a time, should the tension on the blade be removed for these extended periods of unused?
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On 4/12/2019 10:57 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Every thing I have read says yes. And a reason that manufacturers often include a quick release for the tension. I believe that the unmentioned blade lasts longer and the tires on the wheels are less likely to develop low spots.
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On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 11:34:14 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

k cuts.  I

Exactly. Always release the tension when you're done sawing.
Sonny
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wrote:

The flates are the biggest issue, for sure.
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On 4/12/2019 12:33 PM, Leon wrote:

I agree although I have never in the last 44 years released the tension on my saw unless changing a blade, with no noticeable detrimental effects. I doubt very much the previous owner did either. It's not a Sears saw though.
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How long does it go between uses?
Puckdropper
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On 4/14/2019 2:12 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Varies a great deal. Sometimes months, sometimes weeks, most often days. The tension adjustment on my saw is there for changing blades. Nothing in the manual suggests releasing the tension. What is supposed to happen if you don't? I think the tension spring might weaken, but mine seems fine, and it's I guess 60 years old or roundabouts. I replaced the tires in 1975 when I bought it, because they were starting to crack. Probably would still be fine but I was more anal then.
I run almost exclusively 3/16" 3 tooth/inch, skip tooth blades. I reckon the tension on a fat blade might be more, but I learned long, long ago that the blade I use works fine for everything I do, from cutting fire wood to cabinet scroll work, circles even resawing. I started using the narrow blade when I was selling those wood name plates you used to see at craft shows and such, and discovered that blade works pretty good for everything.
Anyway, I doubt it hurts anything to release the tension, just saying for me, it hasn't hurt anything not doing it.
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On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 10:58:02 AM UTC-5, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wro te:

No, merely loosen the tension on the blade. You can make a jig to do that for you. All you need is a bracket, a wedge and an all-thread rod. These are all made from scrap around your shop. Ma ke a three sided bracket that will fit on the place where your tensioner ad juster. This does not need to be all that tall. Drill a hole for the all- thread to go through and glue a 1x1 to the backside of the bracket, on top of course. Get a solid 1.25 x1.25 piece about two feet long. About 1.5" b ack from one end, drill for the all-tread to pass through. Round over the bottom edge of the piece on the front end, so it will be able to pivot up a nd down. Secure the all-thread against the bar, snug. but not tight. Wit h the bandsaw blade slacked, move the bar up on the wedge iin the back and then put as much tension on the blade as you want to carry. When you slid e the bar off the wedge in the back your blade is slacked enough to not cau se it to stretch.
Hope it helps.
Deb
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On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 1:10:02 PM UTC-4, Dr. Deb wrote:
rote:

ummm...I believe that that is what he asked, so the answer is Yes, not No. ;-)
"...should the tension on the blade be removed...?"

e and an all-thread rod. These are all made from scrap around your shop. Make a three sided bracket that will fit on the place where your tensioner adjuster. This does not need to be all that tall. Drill a hole for the al l-thread to go through and glue a 1x1 to the backside of the bracket, on to p of course. Get a solid 1.25 x1.25 piece about two feet long. About 1.5" back from one end, drill for the all-tread to pass through. Round over th e bottom edge of the piece on the front end, so it will be able to pivot up and down. Secure the all-thread against the bar, snug. but not tight. W ith the bandsaw blade slacked, move the bar up on the wedge iin the back an d then put as much tension on the blade as you want to carry. When you sl ide the bar off the wedge in the back your blade is slacked enough to not c ause it to stretch.

If it's the same style of Craftsman's band saw that I have, an external tensioner would be advantageous. The tension indicator on mine is inside the body of the saw. It's just a line molded into the case which you use to visually line up a large washer on the tensioning rod. The knob is external to the saw, but the indicator is inside. It's not really set up for de-tensioning/re-tensioning between uses.
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On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 11:57:58 -0400, Keith Nuttle

Yes
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On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 11:57:58 -0400, Keith Nuttle

This type question generated a number of responses when posted on Saw Mill Creek. Split decision.
I have a Rikon band saw and looked at the User Manuel today and it says nothing about the need to release the tension. YMMV
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On 4/12/2019 11:57 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

I always do, figuring that the few extra seconds of effort can't hurt anything and certainly might help.
It seems likely to me, based on nothing more than instinct, that the smaller the wheels on the saw the more useful it would be to let the tension off to prevent making "lumps" in the blade; same thing with the blade width -- the wider thicker blades would be more likely to have enough strength to take a noticeable set. Probably the worst of all possible worlds would be one of those cockamamie three-wheel saws with tiny wheels and a wide resaw blade cranked up to the max tension.
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