Anyone ever built an Island-like Range Hood?

Hi, folks-- I'm seeking some inspiration here.
To me, any plans for what I'm looking for are pretty difficult to come by. Some of you also participated in my "restoration of a tin ceiling" thread , and I'd appreciate anyone's thoughts here.
I have built an island in the middle of my kitchen. There are two 6X6" dou g fir posts holding up a 8X8" doug fir beam. The distance from outside post to outside post is 66". I used 2x6" studs in there, and the electrical out lets are up to code. The height of this wall, to the bottom of a walnut bu tcher block bartop that I assembled from planks is 4'. (It's a convenient d rywall dimension and also suitable to get over the top of a standard range. ) Consider this wall, capped with butcher block, to be the island's divider .
On one side of this island will be a table top-- eat-in kitchen style, exce pt it will be fixed to the divider wall at counter height.
On the other side of the island is my stove. Gas range with one 15" cabinet on each side. 36" range + 30" cabinets= the same 66" from outside post to post.
On the eat-in/table side of this beam is my tin ceiling that I mentioned be fore; On the other side, over the range is my 1/2"x4" T&G doug fir v-groov e (beadboard) ceiling that I built, in part, to salvage all possible tin fo r the rest of the kitchen.
Keeping in mind that what separates these sides and the surfaces at ceiling level is a simple beam, and not a full wall by any stretch... my challeng e is to design & build a decent looking Island Range Hood to fit my 500 CFM Broan insert. I'm looking for some design that, preferably, won't break up too much of the line of sight. I know that I need to attach this somehow to either my joists or AT LEAST the 2x2" members that I strung for my T&G ceiling-- but for obvious reasons, I would prefer to attach it to the joist s.
A 6" Duct to the outside is already lying in wait above the range -- not ju st over the dropped soffit/T&G ceiling, but all the way up in my joist bay, 67" above the range's grates. If I should be appx. 30-34" above my range , then my hood needs to be appx. 33-37" from joist bottom to the bottom of the hood. On the other hand, the distance between my the top of my range's grates & my dropped Fir ceiling is 58". I can either "keep building" the hood all the way up to the joists, or I can stop at the ceiling and merely "duct" the rest of the way; use stringers to attach both to each other.
The hood's electrical circuit is also an easy matter.
Absolutely any thoughts on assembly, design, and/or general ideas for this thing would be appreciated. Honestly, this particular facet of my kitchen remodel has been like having writer's block for me, and I'm really not sure why. I'm just drawing a blank on where to start and how to house this thi ng.
Many, many thanks.
Steve
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wrote:

Do you know the recommended square footage for the hood, and the height off the top of the range and oven so that it can operate efficiently with the fan you currently have?
What about grease filters and grease traps? The loss of pressure across the air filters, and is you fan actually rated for use above a stove?
Is it an inline fan or a canned fan?
These are all critical factors for proper smoke/odor/heat exhaust. This size of your range has a great deal to do with it.
Will you have a heat sensor in your hood to automatically turn on the fan when cooking or baking?
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On Friday, April 21, 2017 at 8:25:07 PM UTC-4, OFWW wrote:

Thanks, OFWW-- I do know some of this info, but I'll need to look up the re st.
Height off grates, from what I can tell, can vary-- (but I'll defer to your knowledge.) I bought a bigger model (in CFM) because I wanted to keep it a little higher than the norm, help me retain those lines of sight, and re duce the risk of fire, since I'm using wood to build this thing as opposed to stainless (for example.) I think I'm looking at installation about 34" above the top of the grates...
...but now that I think about it, that statement doesn't answer the questio n of whether 34" is to the bottom of the insert, or the bottom of my hood's box, which I imagine extends an inch or 2 lower.
in re filters or traps... I think filters, but I'll need to refresh my memo ry of the exact type. Not sure about inline or canned. I'll need to look t hat up, frankly. Thank you for expanding my knowledge here!
Yes, the fan is intended for use over a stove... HOWEVER I will acknowledge that it was NOT intended for use in an Island. This was another reason fo r my up-sizing this purchase to 500 CFM. The Duct is sized properly for th is unit @ 6" I understand that I'll need make up air somewhere, too.
The range is "decent sized" but by no means enormous-- it's not one of tho se 'residential commercial' models or anything. Samsung, 5 burners, 17,50 0 BTU for the largest, if I recall.
No automatic sensor.
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wrote:

Wood? Above a stove? Have you consulted the appropriate building codes and insurance underwriters? This sounds like a disaster in the making.

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On Sunday, April 23, 2017 at 6:24:49 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Yes, Wood, generally speaking, is perfectly fine above a range-- AS LONG AS you keep the appropriate distance (or greater) above the range.
Many times, for example, hoods are built into cabinets for a more 'seamless' look; many cabinet companies also make wooden hoods-- but they're pricey... and often shoddy. This is in part why I'm looking for plans.
You are correct to consider the question, and the IRC has considered it as well. Individual jurisdictions (State, County, Muni) also have additional requirements, but it's possible and common.
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replying to Steve, peter wrote: Metal is inside of the cabinet the wood is designed around a commercial hood or something to that effect. All comes down to the town and the inspector. they will tell you the approved distances material etc. Like gas has to be direct vented to the outside in my area.. The metal exhaust has to be encased in the upper cabinets or you will fail inspection.. Plus if you do not get inspection and a fire your insurance will probably not pay. Its illegal.. Permit office will have all info you must follow..
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wrote:

Steve, I see big problems ahead for you, One is you will need to call Nutone and see that their fans can handle cfm wise per sq foot of open hood space. Then you also have to factor that in with the height above the range, between the range and opening of the hood. Otherwise the fan might work great, it will not draw off the heat and fumes, rendering the hoods efficiency pretty low.
Also, most all hoods I ever worked on were lined with copper or stainless steel so they would be washable and inherently flame resistant. A wood hood is bad as it will soak up grease, oils, and vapors off the food products, and will also penetrate the wood over time increasing its flammability.
Regarding filters or grease traps, the framing for those must be metal, since with heat and grease build up on either traps or filters, the grease runs downhill and needs a place to collect it and be cleaned frequently. The edge of the hood should also have a trough like this. | |_| so that the grease and oils trapped on the hood surace can run into it and stop any possible dripping onto your stove or in your cooking utensils. Essential if you do any heavy cooking. The trough can have a slotted drain cup to pull out and clean in between major clean ups.
The of course there is the issue of lighting, covers on hot bulbs so that they do not inadvertently ignite from the grease caught on them while the lights are off. Turn on the lights, heat up and possible fire. Not often, mind you, but it is a safety issue.
Your local sheet metal shop can fabricate a liners or copper, or SS, with holes already cut for your duct, fans, lights, or electrical connectors for you lights, complete with trough around the edges and a 5 degree slant to the drain trap box for easy cleanup. The can also build a filter or grease trap frame for whatever you decide to use.
It can be done, just get your spec's before you design and build.
By all means call NuTone or check their web site for info, or similar manufacturer, it is not a guessing games, Exhaust fans are rated by duct size and length as it has to be able to pull free air and push it through the ductwork. Measured is static inches./cfm
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On Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 9:20:10 PM UTC-4, OFWW wrote:

Thank you very much, OFWW-- you've given me a ton of great info, and a lot more to consider here. I'll call the Manufacturer and I'll see where that takes me. I hate the idea of having a shining stainless steel thing in m y 1912 kitchen; but I'll definitely talk to my local sheet metal co. and s ee what my options look like.
thanks again,
Steve
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replying to Steve, peter wrote: If you raise the hood up grease will go all over the house. It only goes up so far before it migrates into the room.. If line of sight is important then a down draft will accomplish that. An island hood is a structural member, costly and will hinder viability in the room. It just will..They do sell some that are glass and have a smaller profile. Remember a hood from the ceiling need a lot of support.. Higher you go more grease all over the home. Down drafts are less efficent, they just are, and yet give best line of sight.. Island hood are costly due to its now structural. Plus you need room around the duct for fire code go ask inspector. Is this really worth your time. Do other projects pony up for a designed hood that will increase your line of sight.. Sometimes its cheaper to spend then fitting a square peg into a round hole. Plus a bigger hood fan will need replacement air IE you must open a window to have the necessary draft. Or the air will pull from all the holes in your home... Bigger is not always better. Remember higher you go more grease will not go up that high.. Sold kitchens for years,, reason you dont see many islands its because of the line of sight.. Open = no overhead hood... down draft and live with the extra cleaning.. 12 inch line or more needed..
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On Apr 21, 2017, Steve wrote

A few thoughts from when we put an addition on:
1. If it is possble to knock one’s head on the smoke hood, make sure all corners and edges are rounded, and the assembly is tied down well enough that it won’t be knockes loose or out of shape.
2. Make sure all things like fans can be accessed for repair without having to break plaster.
3. Make sure that the fan is powerful enough at top setting to ensure that almost all grease smoke exits the kitchen via the fan. This is an extension of the more general requirement that the fan be large enough to handle the max thermal output of the stove. If not, the cook will slowly cook.
4. Make sure that the dishwasher is large enough to accomodate the hood’s grease-filter panels, as the filter panels must be washed from time to time, and this typically cannot be done by hand.
Joe Gwinn
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On Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 5:26:38 PM UTC-4, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

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Hi Joe, thanks for your time, as well.
1) thanks for this tip. I think I'm trying to get it up higher out of ra nge (for most heads) when the depth of the range is considered... and comm on sense sometimes alludes me! so I appreciate this reminder.
2) Another great point, Maybe I build in an access panel, if that won't re sult in a loss of suction. (I don't THINK it would, because the ducting sho uld be sealed, no matter how big or small I build the box to hold it.)
3) I recall buying a hood-insert that will clear this range, but as I prev iously admitted to OFWW, I did not buy a "Island-specific" model.
4) More common sense I never considered. I think I'm good here, but I'll n eed to verify this fact. Thanks again.
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