another good reason for sharp tools

was just removing some very small end grain bumps chisel caught and then released at an unexpected angle
the finger cut was deep and took a while before it bled but it was a super fine and clean cut
my point is that this cut heeled up much more quickly than any other cut
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On Friday, May 4, 2018 at 10:49:20 PM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

I suppose you are speaking of skin, only, damage. I'd say not so. The sharpness of the tool has nothing to do with the heal ing process or speed of healing. Skin on the finger (pads) is thicker tha n in other places.
Below: More comment than you may want or expect..... some should be comm on sense, though.
Considerations: How deep is the cut? Skin deep is not so critical. Skin is an amazing organ, typically heals fast and usually without many problem s. Skin is the protective barrier between the outside world and your inte rnal body parts. Many folks seem to take skin for granted and don't take care of it, as they probably should. When cuts are deeper, into the subcu taneous tissues, muscles, connective tissues, tendons, ligaments, etc., the issues of and with scar tissue requires more and often specific attention. Skin and other tissues heal "across" the cut, not along its length. Skin heals at about the same speed, unless there is something wrong with the ski n tissue in the first place (like with sun damaged skin, eczema, psoriasis, etc.). Also, it doesn't matter if the cut is clean or ragged. However, a ragged cut is more likely to have more scar tissue develop, hence possibl y giving the impression of slower healing.
When one has a cut, it is good to move your body part, during the healing p rocess, as you normally would. With the range of motion, if there is any s car tissue forming, the scar tissue aligns itself, more so, with the surrou nding tissues, hence disallowing a somewhat knot-forming area at the cut si te. This range of motion concept is especially important when one has a c ut in/along a joint. You don't want any joint tissue to be bound down by scar tissue. You want to maintain flexibility through as much of its full range of motion as possible.
During healing and despite a little (pin prick type) pain, maybe, one wants to maintain as much range of motion (at the wound site), by moving (flexin g, extending) normally. When scar tissue begins forming, one may feel pin -pricks of pain, during movement, as the scar tissue is torn (from its knot forming tendency) into a striated form (in alignment with normal undamaged tissue).
When scar tissue is stretched out, by range of motion movement, you're esse ntially re-injuring yourself at each those small pin-prick sites, hence the healing process starts over, there, and the overall healing time is/may be further extended.
Scar tissue is less vascular (no normal blood supply), than otherwise norma l healing tissue, hence the possibility of the healing process being delaye d.
Infection at a cut site may slow the healing process, as well. When you ge t a cut, you want it to bleed, at least a little. The bleeding "washes ou t" at least some infectious/infecting bugs. For large, really "dirty" cuts , physicians will leave a wound open (not stitched closed), so that the bod y's natural expulsion of the debris has an escape route (drainage). In mo re severe cases, especially infectious cases, packing (a sterile cotton str ip of cloth) is inserted into a wound and the drainage can wick out much fa ster/easier, i.e., a more direct escape route.
When you DO cut yourself, allow it to bleed a little. Also, take note if t he bleeding is in a slow running stream or in squirts. Slow running strea ms indicate a vein is cut. In squirts indicates an artery is cut. A cut artery may need more and specific attention paid to the treatment or treat ment process.
About 2 months or so ago, I accidentally stabbed myself in the wrist, with a carving tool. I was very lucky not to have stabbed my radial artery or cut any flexor tendons. The sharpness of my tool was no factor with regar d to the accident, itself, or the damage site. I probably needed a sharpe r eye and/or sharper mind.
Sonny
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wrote:

Great info and advice!
Glad to hear you came out ok on this.
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