Wood burning stove in a conservatory

I am contemplating having a new conservatory built. This will join onto an existing single storey hipped-roof extension to the main house.
Rather than extend central heating to the conservatory, I thought a wood burning stove might be an idea.But I was wondering about building regs re: flues in this situation. I think I've read that the flue stack needn't extend vertically more than 1m. above the extension roof (ridge?). I've not got experience of wood burning stoves so am not sure how important this actually is? e.g. problems with down-draft.
Any advice/comments?
Cheers.
Chris S
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Chris S wrote:

Consult building regs and stove manufacturers. BTW this is an excellent idea..get one with a self cleaning glass.
Use a double skinned SS flue - that gets round any need to make a flue out of masonry. IIRC you can also get 'flue through a roof' plates that take care of flashing as well.
Build a BIG tiled hearth with room to stack wood.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

+1
The building regs for flues has lots of useful diagrams (google should turn up a copy, it's a public document).
The biggest problem would be siting the flue end far enough away/high enough above other windows in the house as this is a conservatory.
You don't want a bad wind blowing a load of CO straight back into the building and the building regs take this little problem into account.
--
Tim Watts

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On Sat, 22 Sep 2012 01:05:44 -0700 (PDT), harry wrote:

Possibly not but it does depend on the position. The building regs documentation is fairly clear

Yep.
Advisable if the stve is going to used unatteneded. Though I think there are regs that try to insist that you have one.

Depends on how much use the stove is going to get the average conservatory would only need a little stove so wouldn't burn that much wood and if it's only used occasionally rather than every day a corner in the shed or garage would be enough.

IIRC <5kW output doesn't but I would make sure there was something.

True enough but there is something "nice" about a real fire, the heat seems warmer, the gentle glow and flickering flames comforting. Though I do doubt the wisdom of one in a conservatory, is that area really going to get used in the dark days of winter?
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Cheers
Dave.




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Dave Liquorice wrote:

I think you do.
BUT there are balance flue designs that sort out most of these issues.

We have a wood burner in the bedroom. fed with air by a pipe to the loft.
It shortens 'days in bed with flue'' remarkably in winter. :-)
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On Friday, 21 September 2012 19:53:58 UTC+1, Chris S wrote:

n existing single storey hipped-roof extension to the main house.

burning stove might be an idea.But I was wondering about building regs re: flues in this situation. I think I've read that the flue stack needn't exte nd vertically more than 1m. above the extension roof (ridge?). I've not got experience of wood burning stoves so am not sure how important this actual ly is? e.g. problems with down-draft.

Just in case anyone comes across this thread in future and need advice i au thored an article on the subject on my google+ page below. Feel free to con tact me for advice. https://plus.google.com/105766355531415505320/posts/2um p77KHoYo
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COO so we just cluck on the lunk you kundly provuded?
How do we know you're not an interweb imposter upto no good??
Jum K
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On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 6:05:03 PM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

According to Google the page is:
2014-06-29 - Google+ https://plus.google.com/105766355531415505320/posts/2ump77KHoYo Jun 29, 2014 - Start here and read all about how to do it http://www.stovemaestro.co.uk/article4 . html. StoveMaestro Manchester Wood Burning Stoves's ...
I smell a tinned meat product toasting gently on a woodburner ...
Owain
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snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

    Assuming that this is a plastic conservatory, I'd be very wary. Wood burning stoves in small sizes can be very difficult to set to a low output level. The radiated heat/conducted from the chimney can be very significant. melting plastic anyone?
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/Capitol - show quoted text - Assuming that this is a plastic conservatory, I'd be very wary. Wood burning stoves in small sizes can be very difficult to set to a low output level. The radiated heat/conducted from the chimney can be very significant. melting plastic anyone/q
Burns well!
Jim K
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On Wednesday, 9 July 2014 18:40:09 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

emaestro.co.uk/article4. html. StoveMaestro Manchester Wood Burning Stoves' s ...

Errr.... it's a free article telling people the basic rules and regs of doi ng it which i provided a link to. No-one is required to buy anything, but i f they read it and think it's useful and want to contact me for help that i s OK too.
Judging by some of the nonsense spouted in here you would think a bit of ac tual knowledge would be welcomed!
By the way "melting pvc anyone". The melting point of upvc is over 200 degr ees C and it also can't catch fire and burn because because it has such a h igh chlorine content. Any competent stove installer knows you have to leave certain safe distances around the stove so it could never be close enough to upvc to heat it to anything like 200 deg c.
Sorry for knowing the answer and sharing it for free though....
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On Friday, 18 July 2014 10:33:04 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

e:

ovemaestro.co.uk/article4. html. StoveMaestro Manchester Wood Burning Stove s's ...

oing it which i provided a link to. No-one is required to buy anything, but if they read it and think it's useful and want to contact me for help that is OK too.

actual knowledge would be welcomed!

grees C and it also can't catch fire and burn because because it has such a high chlorine content. Any competent stove installer knows you have to lea ve certain safe distances around the stove so it could never be close enoug h to upvc to heat it to anything like 200 deg c.

errrr.... Which answer are you claiming to know and sharing for free?
Jim K
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snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

         Would be nice if you did. PVC flows from about 65C. I have some vinyl blinds used in a workshop which are scrap as a result of plastic flow in sunlight. The wood burning stove also had the same effect on the same blinds, this is where the stove is not exiting through a PVC roof, but the hot air layer at ceiling level was, I guess, at 60C. The combination of a wood burning stove and a PVC conservatory IMO is a no no as many small woodburning stoves can produce unwanted amounts of heat if wrongly operated. PVC windows suffer from warping in everyday use, normally not much and the seals can cope. Under hot climate conditions, it is a known hazard. Do some homework!
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On Friday, 21 September 2012 19:53:58 UTC+1, Chris S wrote:

Just in case anyone comes across this thread in future and need advice i authored an article on the subject on my google+ page below. Feel free to contact me for advice. https://plus.google.com/105766355531415505320/posts/2ump77KHoYo
Good info here on the topic. http://www.stovefittersmanual.co.uk/articles/building-regulations-for-wood-burning-stoves/
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On Friday, 21 September 2012 19:53:58 UTC+1, Chris S wrote:

Just in case anyone comes across this thread in future and need advice i authored an article on the subject on my google+ page below. Feel free to contact me for advice. https://plus.google.com/105766355531415505320/posts/2ump77KHoYo
Try and get a stove with primary secondary and tertiary air intakes or pyrolising. They are cleaner, more efficient, use less wood. Also room sealed is a big advantage. A lot of stoves have conversion kits for this. (No draughts into the room)
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wrote:

I suspect that he's reading this on one of those parasitic scraping sites and has gained his impressions over there. No usenet at all, is my guess.
Nick
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