Who sells the cheapest good quality magnolia exterior masonry paint?

Hi, Who sells the cheapest good quality magnolia exterior masonry paint at present? (That is to say, at which well-known builders' merchant or DIY shed?)
I need about 20L, and was shocked to find that my local Jewsons' is charging about 22 for 7.5L (and that was a special offer)!
TIA
Al
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130.133.4.11:

PS... I'd like something that will do the job in one coat. The walls have been painted magnolia before, and the paint is sound,; it's just got discoloured by the usual green stuff and black stuff that typically grows on exterior painted walls after a few years. Should I treat those areas withy bleach or anti-fungal spray, or can I just paint over them? The growth is very thin indeed.
Al
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On 12/04/2014 20:32, AL_n wrote:

Pressure wash, then treat. If the paint is truly sound,that'll do the job, if not, then you need to repaint anyway.
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Tciao for Now!

John.
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When we were looking for good quality paint, we found Brewers (paint specialist) was cheapest at the time.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On Sat, 12 Apr 2014 21:44:00 +0100, John Williamson wrote:

A good pressure wash should do for normal grime and algae. Moss gets into the mortar/stone and will grow back through the paint so needs to be killed off.
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Dave.
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wrote in news:XnsA30DCF2D52A8Dzzzzzz@

You might find that water jetting is all it needs. Be carefull, not to strip the paint off by standing too close.
I wash my house down once a year with the pressure jet machine, paint comes up like new. I have the smooth finish, dunno how you would go on with the non-smooth finish.
You will definitely need to clean off any algy and treat with anti-fungal stuff before you paint in the event it does need painting. BTW, the anti-fungal stuff you by is better than bleach.
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On 12/04/2014 20:24, AL_n wrote:

Thats a good price! For some reason white is cheaper than colours.
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Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in writes:

Thanks to everyone for the replies. I appreciate the tip about pressure- washing. I will do that. I'd still like to repaint, because previous repainting has been done in patches, and the colour is not quite uniform throughout.
There is also a long (thin) crack stretching from soffit to the ground, where the rendering of the extension meets the rendering of the original house. I once tried covering and filling it with masonry paint, but it reappeared. So now I'm considering using a 1" strip of fine glass fibre chopped strand surface tissue (as used in grp), embedded within the paint layer. Has anyone tried anythingthing like this?
TIA
Al
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On 13 Apr 2014 10:16:37 GMT, AL_n wrote:

Oh dear, is the render still sound either side for a foot or so and full length of the crack? If you tap it gently with a small hammer does it sound "solid" or "hollow"? Hollow means the render at that point is no longer properly bonded to the wall.

Think I'd rake the crack out to 1/8" to 1/4" wide almost full depth of the render and fill with a fine sand and cement mix. Depending on the surafce finish of the existing render that might be invisible once painted. I supect that a bit of glass tissue paint bonded on will always be visible as a strip.
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The rendering sounds solid. Looking at it, it's not one single crack runnung from top to bottom, its a number of long hairline cracks that don't quite meet up. They really do look as though paint should be enough to cover them over. I think I'll try applying a thincker coat or several coats over the crack and I think that should do it. They are only hairline cracks, but they do look as though they are cracks in the rendering - presumably due to contraction, either due to drying out or...something else! It's where a block-build extension meets a solid stone part of the house. It was done 25 years ago, so I'm not too worried about it. There'so sign of any real problem peyond those those hairline cracks. I suppose it's only to be expected that on old 1850s solid stone building is going to move and expand differently than a modern cavity wall extension.
Thanks for your input though...
Al
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ISTR that certain DIY sheds have a sale some time in early Spring. Perhaps I'll hang on in hope of a good one coming up...
Al
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On 15/04/2014 18:51, AL_n wrote:

IME the longest lasting masonry paint by far is the pliolite solvent based from Johnstones and others. It's also the most expensive but magnolia is often on special
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