Weeding part 2

On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 22:07:10 +0100 (GMT+01:00), Jim K

I expect it will turn out to be photographic paper than needs to be kept in the dark:-)
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On 06/07/18 19:14, Scott wrote:

Boiled bleach turns into sodium chlorate
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On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 11:15:14 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

Could be a 'Don't try this one at home' situation though :-)
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On 7/6/2018 3:16 PM, Scott wrote:

Vinegar, salt and borax.
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2018 18:32:12 +0100, S Viemeister

Could you give me an idea of quantities? I assume not particularly harmful as harm goes to dogs etc?
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On Friday, July 6, 2018 at 6:34:41 PM UTC+1, Scott wrote:

Old carpets work, so does concrete. A fabric and chips needs an annual application of weed killer, I would skip the fabric: seeds will come in from above. Mulching makes the weeds easy to pull out, but provides them nutrients to grow well. Forget vinegar etc. There is no easy solution. I have a patch of clover that I have sown, 15m by 15, it does out compete most weeds, but I have pulled weeds out of it too.
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On 7/6/2018 6:34 PM, Scott wrote:

No precise measurements, I'm afraid. Lots of vinegar, a scoop or two of salt, and a handful of borax. My mother liked to boil the vinegar, then mix in the salt and borax, and use it while as hot as possible. She had a lovely garden, and no, small quantities of borax, soaked into the soil, are unlikely to have any ill effects on dogs.
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On 06/07/2018 18:32, S Viemeister wrote:

Vinegar works well on the leaves and shallow rooted weeds. Weeds with deep tap roots will need repeated doses of vinegar when the leaves start emerging again after a week or so.
Some weed leaves (those with fine hairs) can shed water or vinegar and so straight vinegar doesn't always work. A wetting agent such as a drop of washing up liquid may help in these circumstances.
Buy the cheapest vinegar you can find. I paid around £4 for a 5L carton the last time and that was from a supermarket not noted for the cheapest of prices - a Co-op in a rural location. I would also advise if going down this route get one of those cheap pump up garden sprayers. If its only a small area recycle one of those hand spray bottles used for kitchen or bathroom cleaners.
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If there was then somebody would be making a fortune. You coule make it very radioactive but I doubt that is practical.
Concrete? Brian
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On Friday, 6 July 2018 15:16:09 UTC+1, Scott wrote:

covering with carpet for a year helps hugely. Steam & fire work, but the litte weedy burners sold for this are fairly hopeless. Mowing works against nearly everything except grasses. Etc.
NT
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On 07/07/18 01:46, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Nope. All you're doing by mowing is removing top growth. True, there are some trees and shrubs which will eventually give up if continually cut back while young (when older all you are doing is coppicing them), but most plants respond with enhanced growth, especially if there are good reserves in their roots. A large number of native, low-growing plants evolved to avoid grazing, and do pretty well. And, let's face it, mowing is just speeded-up grazing.
Covering with a light-proof membrane of some sort will work. But if you have plants with an extensive root system which can be fed by growth outside of the blackout area, well, all bets are off. And don't forget the seeds which will be exposed once the membrane is removed...
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I had a rose patch plus weeds, dug everything out, left a month then used glyphosate for any new weeds. Membrane from ebay then phoned a tree surgeon and got 1.5 tons of wood chip for £25. covered the lot. I just get the odd weed at the edges that glyphosate takes care of.
Bark is better for mulching but the wood chips are fine for me. I put an apple tree in the middle of it to take away the bare look.
So far so good.
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On Saturday, 7 July 2018 07:59:57 UTC+1, Jeff Layman wrote:

regular mowing is very effective at keeping lawns lawns, and turning weed patches into lawns. I'm sure if you only mowed once a year it would be entirely ineffective.
NT
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On 06/07/18 15:16, Scott wrote:

No.
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who talks little,When his work is done, his aim fulfilled,They will say,
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Scott wrote:

green concrete.
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