"Weak" Electricity

I have an electrical outlet in the loft mounted on the wall adjacent
to our neighbour.
When a light bulb is connected to it, it does not illuminate as much
as it would iof connected to an electircal outloet downstairs.
Is there an obvious reason for this?
Thanks
Reply to
de_ja
I do not think another light in the house illuminates.
BTW when i refer to an electical outlet I am referring to the one that you would plug an electrical appliance to. (I probably was not very clear about this). I was initially using a lead lamp in the attic, connected to the suspect electical outlet.
But as the lamp is not illuminated very brightly I am currently using an extension cable from downstairs which is a pain in the arse.
A colleague at my work has suggested that this could be a fire hazard and should not be used until I have an electrician investigate who might probably have to rewire the outlet to another "ring".
Reply to
de_ja
It might not be a fire hazard (at least until you use it) but it is a sufficiently bizarre (and therefore possibly serious) fault that it must be looked at! It *may* indicate a fault with the wiring that might cause an electric shock hazard elesewhere (for eaxample).
Reply to
Bob Mannix
Might sound daft - but try having a portable radio tuned to Medium Wave then plugging in the light. If you get interference on the radio then it indicates a bad connection (causing sparking).
Does the cable appear to be of adequate size? If very thin it could be heating up and acting as a resistance.
Reply to
John
In article ,
Worth checking. Easy to do. Or switch on all the upstairs lights and see if the socket still works.
Yes - I guessed as much.
The thing is there isn't normally a ring circuit (for sockets) routed through the attic, but there usually is a lighting circuit. So many will use that to feed a socket - which isn't really correct but not dangerous if you realise its limitations power wise. But it's possible to wire it incorrectly.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article , de_ja scribeth thus
I bet this has been wired in series with something else. If your not that confident with electrics I reckon you'd best get someone in...
Reply to
tony sayer
Series - my thought but the OP has been asked if he notices anything else coming on when the loft socket is used.
Reply to
John
I don't know how much you know about electrics, but it is possible that this socket is incorrectly wired, probably with neutral and earth swapped over but it could be worse. I would recommend that you get someone who knows about such things to have a proper look at it as this is a safety issue - particularly in a loft. The wiring problem may not be at the socket end, of course.
Reply to
mick
In article Man at
... unless the socket had been wired in parallel with a light switch.
Does the light plugged into the socket still work if _all_ the upstairs lights are on?
Reply to
Mike Clarke
In article , Man at B&Q scribeth thus
Yep but we don't quite know what this socket is connected, or to where or what across!...
Reply to
tony sayer
Thanks for the information(s).
I'll check if the other lights come on, tomorrow and will check with the aid of a candle, the wiring behind the electrical outlet. I am confident with checking if the wires are put in the right holes (colours) and done up tightly, as I have renewed many of the light switches and outlets in the house. If I can't see anything obvious, I am going to leave it and have an electrician take a look when I can afford it.
Reply to
de_ja
On 23 Nov,
What sort of lamp?
If incandescent, does it look redder than ones downstairs.
Bulbs often seem weaker when in lofts because the loft is bigger and dirtier than the rest of the house. I have several large fluorescents in the loft, and it is still dim compared with elsewhere, because of its size and atate.
Reply to
<me9
This is a very good point! I've noticed a similar thing myself, but the OP mentioned that he reverted to a long extension lead from below, so I'm sure that he'd have noticed the difference. Of course, I don't know if he has used the same lamp...
Reply to
mick
In message , de_ja writes
I really hope you're not serious about the candle..
Ahh, the plot thickens, did the socket work OK before you replaced the switches and sockets? Do you remember any light switches with 'extra' cables or more than you'd expect when you changed the switches and sockets? I'd have somebody watch the light in the loft and then wander around switching on every light in the house after having asked them to shout if anything changes. If you can identify a switch or socket that changes the light in the loft then it at least makes it easier for any electrician to rectify the fault because you've done half the work for them.
Probably best if it's a wiring error and not just loose contacts.
Reply to
Clint Sharp
tomorrow and will check with
Thanks,
This problem has occurred since I moved in, before and after I changed all the electrical outlet covers.
I have found (by switiching the trip switches) that the outlet in the loft appears to be connected to the lighting circuit for at least the front and rear bedroom on the first floor. From the useful information provided here I understand that this is incorrect procedure.
Why would the electricity be so "weak", it is "weak" even though both bedroom lights are not illuminated.
I'll not use that outlet until I hire a qualified electrician to correctly rewire it.
Thanks for all information.
Reply to
de_ja

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