"We Dont Know How To Recall A Planetary Scale Geoengineering Project"

Hope i got tha qote right,, my short term is abit iffy...
Article here....
http://www.scribd.com/doc/174906270/Retooling-the-Planet
Pull quote here lorem ipsumdolor sit amet 1 I t is beyond dispute that cumulative, local interven-tions in ecosystems can bring about planetary-leveleects. That’s why we have human-induced climatechange. However, another notion is quickly gain-i ng ground: that we can use geoengineering to pur-poseully interven e to correct the unintentional harmhuman activity has done to the climate.G eoengineering is the intentional, large-scale interven-tion in the Earth s oceans, soils, and/or atmosphere,especially with the aim o combating climate change.Geoengineering can reer to a wide range o schemes,including blasting sulate particles into the st ratosphereto reect the Sun’s rays, dumping iron particles into theoceans to nurture carbon-dioxide-absorbing plankton,fring silver io dide into clouds to produce rain, geneti-cally engineering crops so their oliage can better reectsunlight, and various other strate gies to aect solar radi-ation management, remove and sequ ester carbon diox-ide, or modiy weather
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On Monday, November 18, 2013 1:09:28 AM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

an bring about planetary-leveleects. That’s why w e have human-induced climatechange. However, another notion is quickly gain -ing ground: that we can use geoengineering to pur-poseully interv ene to correct the unintentional harmhuman activity has done to the climate .Geoengineering is the intentional, large-scale interven-tion in the Earth ’s oceans, soils, and/or atmosphere,especially with the aim o combating climate change.Geoengineering can reer to a wide ran ge o schemes,including blasting sulate particles into the stratosphereto reect the Sun’s rays, dumping iron particl es into theoceans to nurture carbon-dioxide-absorbing plankton,fring silver iodide into clouds to produce rain, geneti-cally engineering crops so thei r oliage can better reectsunlight, and various other stra tegies to aect solar radi-ation management, remove and se quester carbon diox-ide, or modiy weather

Hunners of trackers as soon as you clickonit,,,
Jusss thought i should mention..
...
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Hope i got tha qote right,, my short term is abit iffy...
Article here....
http://www.scribd.com/doc/174906270/Retooling-the-Planet
Pull quote here lorem ipsumdolor sit amet 1 I t is beyond dispute that cumulative, local interven-tions in ecosystems can bring about planetary-levele??ects. That's why we have human-induced climatechange. However, another notion is quickly gain-ing ground: that we can use geoengineering to pur-pose?ully intervene to correct the unintentional harmhuman activity has done to the climate.Geoengineering is the intentional, large-scale interven-tion in the Earth's oceans, soils, and/or atmosphere,especially with the aim o? combating climate change.Geoengineering can re?er to a wide range o? schemes,including blasting sul?ate particles into the stratosphereto re?ect the Sun's rays, dumping iron particles into theoceans to nurture carbon-dioxide-absorbing plankton,fring silver iodide into clouds to produce rain, geneti-cally engineering crops so their ?oliage can better re?ectsunlight, and various other strategies to a??ect solar radi-ation management, remove and sequester carbon diox-ide, or modi?y weather
..................... Utter bollix.
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We stand no chance till we can get a spell checker that works either apparently. Brian
--
From the Sofa of Brian Gaff Reply address is active
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On 18/11/2013 09:18, Brian Gaff wrote:

Probably blocked by his foil helmet
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On Mon, 18 Nov 2013 21:42:54 +0000, Phil L wrote:

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Smee Again,,,,
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WATER..
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jay-famiglietti/water-and-the-roots-of- vi_b_3884175.html
Water and the Roots of Violent Conflict in Syria
I am often asked these days about whether I think that the decade-long drought in Syria has played any role in the violent conflict there. My answer is always the same: absolutely.
The reason is quite simple, and we have all experienced it. When our basic human needs are not met -- for water, food, clothing, shelter, or sleep -- we get grumpy. When we get grumpy, we fight. We'll snap at our children, bicker with our partners and argue with our neighbors. In regions like the Middle East, which has fought over water for several millennia, it does not take much to fan the flames of dispute into a bonfire of violent conflict.
Last February our research team released a new study of groundwater depletion in the Middle East. The area that we analyzed included Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran. The political boundaries of these countries overlie a different set of boundaries, namely those of the Fertile Crescent - the Tigris and Euphrates River basins that supplied the water to support the cradle, and rise, of human civilization.
Using NASA satellites, we found that between 2003 and 2009, the region had lost 144 cubic kilometers of fresh water, an amount that is equivalent to the volume of the Dead Sea. We determined that roughly 60% of the lost water came from the depletion of the regions aquifers (mostly used for irrigation), making it the second hottest of the world's hotspots for groundwater depletion. Only northwestern India has experienced greater groundwater losses in the same time frame. Subsequent analyses have shown that those rates of water loss continue into the present.
Sitting right in the crosshairs of that Middle Eastern hotspot is Syria, as shown in the satellite image below....
That's not to say that the severe water shortages directly resulted in violent conflict. However, Syria has in fact experienced the perfect storm of water-related misfortunes, that taken together, have arguably played a major role in triggering uprising and violence. Let me highlight a few of these here.
First, the long history of documented tensions over water and its control dates back almost 4500 years. When the default mode of settling disputes has historically been war, it is a very easy pattern fall back on. Regional political instability does nothing to help break this pattern.
Second, Turkey's Greater Anatolia Project, a vast system of reservoirs built just upstream of Syria and Iraq, allows Turkey to store voluminous water reserves within its borders, that would otherwise flow into these downstream nations. Reports indicate that river flows into Syria and Iraq may have been reduced by 40 to 80 percent as a result of the upstream reservoirs. There is little choice for anyone downstream, upon the loss of a significant source of fresh river water, but to tap into groundwater reserves.
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http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2013/09/17/why-water-is-key-to- syria-conflict/
Why water is key to Syria conflict 17 September 2013
Back in 2009, as President Obama was taking office, there was talk of how Syria’s water scarcity problem could spark major social and economic instability. Indeed, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies published an Operations Report on the Syrian drought, noting that some 800,000 people were severely vulnerable, and “over the past three years, their income has decreased by 90 percent and their assets and sources of livelihood have been severely compromised.” The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for its part released a study in 2011 linking more frequent droughts in the Mediterranean and the Middle East to climate change, noting Syria was experiencing the worst drying in the region.
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http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2013/05/20135268026616381.html
Amman, Jordan - Najeem Azzoubi, a heavy-set Jordanian in his mid-60s, is upset. Before Syrian refugees began arriving in droves in 2011, water was delivered once a week to his home in the northern Jordanian town of Ramtha.
Then, as more and more Syrians fled their country's civil war, squeezing into apartments and occupying empty stores in Jordan, water grew scarcer. Now, Azzoubi says, water comes every 14 days and "has stopped being enough".
Nearly half a million Syrian refugees are living in Jordan, according to official statistics from the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR). But many Jordanians, officials included, insist that about one million more have taken up residence in cities and towns throughout Jordan, whose population stood at about 6.3 million before the crisis.
The rapid population increase - 1,000 to 2,000 refugees cross into Jordan daily - has left the Jordanian government and local authorities struggling to keep up with the demand for its scant water resources, even as the country is considering drastic solutions to increase its water supply.
Water experts also point out that Jordan's water sector has long been in need of reform, even before the refugee influx. It remains to be seen whether Jordan's Syrian "guests" will push Jordan from a shortage to a full-fledged crisis, as so many Jordanians claim.
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Water in Palestine Snip
The Wall is not only an Apartheid Wall, but also a water wall. Some of the largest Israeli settlements (such as Ariel and Qedumin) are built over the Western mountain aquifer, directly in the middle of the northern West Bank agricultural districts, and this is exactly where the wall cuts deepest into Palestinian territory to surround and annex this vital water source. The building of the Wall has caused the village of Falamya in Qalqiliya district to lose its main source of water. In Jayyous, a village near Falamya, all of its seven water wells have been annexed or destroyed by the Apartheid Wall. In the West Bank, around 50 groundwater wells and over 200 cisterns have been destroyed or isolated from their owners by the Wall. This water was used for domestic and agricultural needs by over 122,000 people. To build the Wall, 25 wells and cisterns and 35,000 meters of water pipes have also been destroyed [5]. In 2003, the losses incurred by Palestinian farmers due to the Wall diverting water resources has been 2,200 tons of olive oil, 50,000 tons of fruit, and 100,000 tons of vegetables [6]. The Wall is obstructing many water run-off flows in the Qalqiliya region that normally divert water to prevent flooding. During heavy rains in February 2005, Israeli soldiers refused to open drainage pipes in Qalqiliya, which led to heavy flood damage to crops and homes there. The Wall also caused severe flooding in Zububa and other villages.
More Here.. http://www.ifamericansknew.org/cur_sit/water.html
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http://www.globalresearch.ca/libyas-water-wars-and-gaddafis-great-man-made- river-project/5334868
Libya’s “Water Wars” and Gaddafi`s Great Man-Made River Project
At the time of the NATO-led war against Libya in 2011, three phases of the Great Man-Made River Project were completed. The first and largest phase, providing two million cubic metres of water a day along a 1,200 km pipeline to Benghazi and Sirte, was formally inaugurated in August 1991. Phase II includes the delivery of one million cubic metres of water a day to the western coastal belt and also supplies Tripoli. Phase III provides the planned expansion of the existing Phase I system, and supplies Tobruk and the coast from a new wellfield.
The ‘rivers’ are a 4000-kilometer network of 4 meters diameter lined concrete pipes, buried below the desert sands to prevent evaporation. There are 1300 wells, 500,000 sections of pipe, 3700 kilometers of haul roads, and 250 million cubic meters of excavation. All material for the project was locally manufactured. Large reservoirs provide storage, and pumping stations control the flow into the cities.
Gaddafi’s dream
It was Muammar Gaddafi’s dream to provide fresh water for all Libyans and to make Libya self-sufficient in food production. In 1953, the search for new oilfields in the deserts of southern Libya led to the discovery not just of significant oil reserves, but also of vast quantities of fresh water trapped in the underlying strata. The four ancient water aquifers that were discovered, each had estimated capacities ranging between 4,800 and 20,000 cubic kilometers. Most of this water was collected between 38,000 and 14,000 years ago, though some pockets are believed to be only 7,000 years old.
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http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/salloum135.html
Middle Eastern breads Habeeb Saloum.
Arabs, the majority people in the Middle East, eat bread with every meal. In tradition and in daily life, bread is held to be a divine gift from God. The Egyptians call bread 'aysh which means "life itself." In the Arab world, if a piece of bread falls on the floor, a person will pick it up and kiss it, then eat it. I used to see this happen at home when my mother dropped a piece of bread on the floor, not allowing it to be thrown away with the garbage.
The Spanish picked up this habit from the Arabs during their long stay in the Iberian Peninsula. In Spain, when a piece of bread falls on the floor, in the Arab fashion they will say: "Es pan de Dios" (in Arabic, 'aysh Allah means God's bread).
The Arabs claim that they cannot taste other foods without bread and the bread types they have to choose from are numerous and varied. Arab bread comes in many textures, sizes, and shapes. Without question, the mother of all these Middle Eastern breads is pita — by far, the most popularly found in the Middle East. Called Khubz Arabee among the Arabs in that part of the world and once called flatbread or Syrian bread in the United States — that is before Syria became the "bad boy" of the Middle East — it is now widely known as pita bread — a Greek name.
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http://aigaforum.com/articles/water-rich-egypt.php
How Water Rich Egypt Sits on Fresh Water Lake but do Little About It?
By Henok Tadele 07/18/13
Pro Egypt Medias claim how Egypt would go thirsty if Ethiopia sips a single drop of water from the Nile River, since the former has no other fresh water sources.
For many of us in Sub Sahara too, Egypt is an arid water less desert who can’t do without river Nile. However, last year’s in-depth research on Africa’s underground water reserve uncovered that Egypt is 4.3 times richer than a seemingly wet Ethiopia.
The detailed research by the British Geological Survey and University College of London (UCL) entitled ‘Quantitative maps of groundwater resources in Africa’ published last year has uncovered that Egypt is the fourth richest country in Africa in underground water reserve following Libya, Algeria and Sudan respectively.
In fact it is so much richer that, excluding Sudan and DRC, Egypt is almost twice richer than all Nile Basin countries put together including Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Eritrea, Uganda, Burundi and Rwanda.
Groundwater storage volumes in North African aquifers including that of Egypt’s can be as high as 75 × 106 m3 km−2 (equivalent to 75 m water depth).
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............. IrememberthatArabspringstartedwifolkswagglinaloafobreadintheair ,,,, ,,,, Playing about with the weather,, a geopoliticalpersuaderwetdream,,,
Panama was running short of water,, then in twennyten it was not....
Shipping lanes opening up in arctic,, handy for some,, nasty ol bergs intha way of big oilbusiness,,,must be niusance,, Probly going on since magnusmanusson declared a mini iceage,, an they overcookedthegooseabit...
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http://skift.com/2013/11/17/the-gulf-airlines-that-spent-100-billion-in-15- minutes/#4
United Arab Emirates’ Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum (front, 2nd R) walks with EADS Chief Executive Tom Enders (2nd L) while on a tour at the opening of the Dubai Airshow November 17, 2013. Gulf airlines splashed out on well over $100 billion of orders on day one of the Dubai Airshow, underscoring a shift in power in the aviation industry and giving a boost to the formal launch of Boeing’s newest 777 jet, as well as to Airbus’s A380 superjumbo...
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http://www.arabnews.com/news/478756
Heavy rains lash Riyadh
http://rt.com/news/saudi-arabia-rare-flooding-844/
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On Monday, November 18, 2013 2:09:28 PM UTC+13, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

I really hate the way people assume that carbon dioxide is some kind of problem. There's no proof of that. Anyone who says there is proof is deluded or a liar. Sequestering CO2 will have a negligible effect unless you plan to sequester hundreds of billions of tons of it, and where are you going to put it, and what will that cost? It's as bad as saying that the ocean is acidic, which it isn't.
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