Water Butt

On Wed, 30 Oct 2013 16:57:11 +0000, harryagain wrote:

I found that one but it seemed they only sold in pallet/part pallet loads. I've no need for either 4 or 8 of them. Ta though.
David
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On 30/10/2013 00:54, Bill wrote:

I rather fear it's scrap. If you bought it cheaply, can't you get a cheap replacement?
When I was a teenager in the Cotswolds over 50 years ago, we had a corrugated galvanised iron water butt. That froze solid one year, and split the seam round the bottom. Against all the odds, I mended that with fibreglass resin/paste (remember David's Isopon?) and it lasted for least another 20 years! But I don't think that would bond with the plastics used these days.
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Roger
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Drain it, dry it out thoroughly inside, get some black bitumen paint gunge and some Flashband from your local DIY shed. Lay the butt on its side with the leak lowermost, crawl in and paint the bitumen generously over and around the area of the leak, then apply a patch of Flashband while the bitumen is still tacky, making sure it's pushed flat all over, and apply more bitumen over that. leave it a day or two for the bitumen to dry. Don't wear your best suit; a torch can be useful to see what you're doing.
By the time you've bought the bitumen and Flashband, it would probably be cheaper to get a new butt. Only cost-effective if you've got some already at the back of the shed/garage/workshop.
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Chris

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On 30/10/2013 11:29, Chris Hogg wrote:

You missed out the cost of replacing the clothes you were wearing to do this job. Bitumen paint goes everywhere especially in a confined space!
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Martin Brown
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On 30/10/2013 00:54, Bill wrote:

It will almost certainly be polyethylene. As others have said, very little sticks to it and bitumen / flashband on the inside is probably the best bet (I have a giant wheelbarrow repaired that way). Holes to "stop" the crack are probably not a bad idea. If the surface is flat you may get an adequate seal by clamping rubber sheet on one side with a suitable plate and a suitable number of nuts and bolts. Although it may weep initially, the crack might well seal itself with silt over time. It can also be repaired by welding with something like a soldering iron, you are likely to need a "filler rod" to build up the thickness. Use bits of scrap polythene from something else.
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