Using two sets of cordless phones on one line

Probably a daft question, but is there any reason not to use two sets of cordless phones on one phone line?
We used to have two phone lines (home and business), but now have just the one. Both had cordless phones, so we now have a spare set of cordless phones. I realise a call could not be transferred from a phone on one set to a phone on the other set, but, other than that, any reason not to use both sets on one line? No possible interference issues?
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Graeme

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On 05/12/2013 21:32, News wrote:

Why not just register the old handsets with one base station?
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Martin Brown
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replying to Martin Brown, Montani42 wrote: Many Panasonic phone systems have phones that are not compatible with a different Panasonic model base.
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On Thursday, 21 December 2017 23:44:05 UTC, Montani42 wrote:

He asked in 2013. Use a saner portal to this newsgroup than the one you're using now. The access page you're using is a pita for everyone.
NT
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posted on December 5, 2013, 9:32 pm Probably a daft question, but is there any reason not to use two sets of cordless phones on one phone line? We used to have two phone lines (home and business), but now have just the one. Both had cordless phones, so we now have a spare set of cordless phones. I realise a call could not be transferred from a phone on one set to a phone on the other set, but, other than that, any reason not to use both sets on one line? No possible interference issues?
--
Graeme

This very old post seems to have surfaced again on the rather perverse Home
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I can only speak for my Gigaset ones that did the same, and I failed to repair. The fault was in the DC-DC converter that converted battery voltage to a more constant value for the phone. These become steadily less efficient and the phone interprets this as a falling battery voltage even when the latter are fully charged. I am afraid that I got as far as finding out it was *not* the large electrolytics at fault, but I never got to the next step of replacing the mosfet. It might of course have been yet a third component, perhaps an IC.
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Roger Hayter

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No. I've got 5 - all different makes - here.
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*Why is the man who invests all your money called a broker? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Oh! That was me! Well, somewhere I have kept the useful instructions about how to make two different sets work together, but have not done anything about it, because it has not proved necessary. Very briefly, the two sets work together, although it is not possible to transfer a call from one set to the other, but it is possible to listen in on a call on one set using a phone from the other set. We don't find that a problem, but others may do so.
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Graeme

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On Thu, 21 Dec 2017 23:44:02 +0000, Montani42 wrote:

The obvious (?) way to go, assuming they are DECT phones, is to only plug one base station into the line and pair all phones with the other base station.
You don't really want two answering machines both trying to answer the same call.
Cheers
Dave R
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wrote:

You should be able to register both phones to one of the base stations then just use the second base station as a dumb charger for its Matching phone. This is all down to basic GAP compatibility, you should be all right making and receiving internal and external calls and (I think) transferring calls but advanced features like answephone might not work from the "foreign" handset.
Give I would give it a try using each BS in turn to see which gives the best results.
You will probably need the manual for the registration procedure, no doubt in a PDF online.
On the other hand... ...sometimes just plugging them in at two phone points so you can just pick up the other extension and continue the conversation is seen as a better plan, especially my SWMBO.
DECT is very good at avoiding mutual interference, it just works.
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Graham.

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On 05/12/2013 21:50, Graham. wrote:

Does that ever work?
My experience with GAP and DECT has been very poor in that I have yet to find two handsets that work together. Maybe I'm just unlucky though.
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On 06/12/2013 08:20, Jon Connell wrote:

Yes. I have got really awful Philips DECT handsets registered to my Panasonic base station with not problems. I binned the Philips base station because it was a complete lemon.

You may have to read the manual cover to cover to make it work but they are usually interoperable. Obviously it isn't in the maker A's interest to make it too easy to register a make A handset with maker B's base.
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Martin Brown
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News wrote:

We have two here, precisely because we don't want to dial between extensions and it's *easier* to transfer calls with two different base stations. Pick up on one, hang up on the other. (This is for transferring a call between a conventional cordless phone and DECT headset).
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Mike Barnes

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wrote:

A friend bought a new DECT phone when one of her two analogue wireless ones packed up. The new phone has a rather quiet ring, so I repaired her analogue one and reinstalled it. Now the combined ringing of the DECT handset, the two analogue handsets and their base-station can be heard in all parts of the house, and any of the three handsets can be used without problems.
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Dave W

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wrote:

And no doubt her conversations can be heard all over the street.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/g3zvt/5566232336/lightbox/
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Graham.

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News formulated the question :

None at all.

If they are a very old analogue set, there might be interference, but probably not - try it.
If they are modern DAC type, set one base up as the one base which is plugged into the line and operate all four phone from that one base, you should then be able to transfer calls between them.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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On 05/12/2013 9:32 PM, News wrote:

There is a limit to the number of devices you can hang on one line according to the sum of their REN numbers. The total max REN used to be reckoned as four in the UK, but I don't know if this is still the case. This article was updated last February, so it should still apply.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ringer_equivalence_number
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Bob - Tetbury, Gloucestershire, UK

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I would think that REN does not apply to DECT extensions as the extensions ringing is not a function of the incoming line - other than the first base unit. Can someone confirm?
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DerbyBorn

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Yes, it's the physical load on the line that matters so the number of DECT handsets does not matter.
It's worth noting too that if a unit (phone/base-station/ringer) places any ringing load on the line then the minimum REN recorded against it must be one (no 0.5 or 0.25). As DECT base stations merely load the line to detect the ringing rather than power the ringer itself then they may present a far lower load, permitting you to break the rules by exceeding an official REN of 4.
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fred
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I can't believe that. The phone has to look like 1 REN otherwise the exchange will think the line is broken. Or maybe I'm wrong, and the BT master socket looks like 1 REN with nothing plugged in?
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Dave W

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