Typical gas costs

Hi,
What are the typical prices per cufoot and m3 for gas from BG on domestic and small comercial contracts. I know it is one the bill, but for various reasons I only have the meter readings and not the paper work.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James Salisbury wrote:

Don't most suppliers now price gas per kWh? Granted with half a dozen units converions and fiddle factors you can get there ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 18:24:23 +0000, Andy Burns

Yes,they do this to blind the public and its not only BG who do it..!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tarquinlinbin wrote:

Really? I find it easier to compare costs if figures are quoted in kWh, so I can't see how it's meant to obfuscate. Unless you mean that the (simple) maths involved in converting cufoot and m3 to kWh is beyond some people, which is fair enough.
Lee
--
Email address is valid, but is unlikely to be read.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tarquinlinbin wrote:

Historically you tend to expect gas to be charged by volume, but comparison of electricity/gas costs is easier when they are both in the same units - perhaps we could persuade them to charge electricity per ft^3
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 11:23:36 UTC, Andy Burns

But that ignores the inconsistency in calorific value...!
--
Bob Eager
begin a new life...dump Windows!
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Burns wrote:

No. Historically gas was sold by the therm, which is a unit of energy, not volume. A therm is 100,000 British thermal units (BTU or BThU, depending on the age of the reader[*]). There's a fixed conversion factor between kWh and therms - one therm is approximately 29.31 kWh.
Conversion from gas meter readings to chargeable energy units has always required use of a 'declared calorific value' figure, which varies depending on the exact constitution of the gas. 'Twas ever thus.
[*] When I wer'a lad, one had to write BThU for British thermal units. BTU meant Board of Trade Unit, which, very confusingly in the current context, is a synonym for kWh - it was the 'Unit' used for billing electricity. So in days of old (and not that long ago actually) you could have said correctly that 1 BTU = 3,412 BThU. But time passes and the both the Board of Trade and their unit have ceased to exist; BTU and BThU seem to have become synonymous.
--
Andy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 18:06:29 -0000, "James Salisbury"

Presumably too high. I heard on Radio 4 this morning (so it must be right) that BG have lost 8% of the market since increasing prices.
This demonstrates that at least some of their customers are not total suckers.
--

.andy

To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.