TV Studio shows - red lights on set ?

Noticed a lot of shows that have a stage now seem to have these circular reddish glowing lights around the sides and back. Looking more like heaters.
Curious as to what exactly they are, since I don't recall seeing them 20 years ago ?
Now I type, has the move to LED lighting prompted the need for extra heating ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Might have done - certasinly theatres which have fully converted to LEDs need less in the way of heat exhaust.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 9 Jun 2019 09:15:32 -0000 (UTC), Jethro_uk wrote:

The latest lighting fad?
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 19:14:18 +0100, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Dunno, but they seem to be everywhere ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can you give an example to look out for?
However, I doubt they'd show heaters unless part of the 'plot'.
--
*Women like silent men; they think they're listening.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:39:49 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Nice example in the background here:
https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/images/ic/640x360/p01j10g1.jpg
Slightly different look here:
https://images.app.goo.gl/m2KSdsQnTL8V8N4d7
One more for good measure:
https://images.app.goo.gl/eFtjAmLSu2kXsWX5A
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, now I understand. I thought you were meaning pure red lights as in the colour of traffic lights or car brake lights. These are incandescent "white" lights with a warmer colour temperature than the lights used to illuminate the set.
I have no idea what the significance of the fad is. The first one is a theatrical lamp, complete with barn doors to restrict the beam of light. The other two don't even have that vague relevance to a stage setting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/06/2019 13:24, Jethro_uk wrote:

Decorating.
The next look will be steampunk.
--
Adrian C

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes - all just set dressing. No practical use involved.
--
*A backward poet writes inverse.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is a pretty standard studio hard source light - the barn doors being the give away. It is run right down on its dimmer and just used as a pretty prop. It's not really doing any lighting as such. It is 'red' like any other tungsten lamp dimmed right down.
Also looks like it is a background pic keyed into place, by the blue fringing round the artist's head and shoulders. Spill from a blue screen. Or just very odd back lighting.
--
*If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It looks more like back lighting with a blue light rather than poor Chromakey, though I suppose if he was very close to a blue screen or it was very brightly over-lit, you might get spill.
As a matter of interest, why is it that they used to use blue backgrounds and keying for Chromakey but nowadays almost always use green? I thought that blue was chosen because it was the least likely primary to be contained in the foreground subject, and the most diammetrically opposite to flesh tones which are the absolute worst thing that they want to cause false triggering.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/06/2019 16:31, NY wrote:

The use of blue was a throw back to 'film chromakey', which I think was the easiest colour to separate out in that process.
Green is chosen for contemporary video chromakey, because it constitutes a higher proportion of the signal, requires less illumination, and therefore generates a better 'mask'.
--
Mark
Please replace invalid and invalid with gmx and net to reply.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was told in BBC training that blue was chosen from RGB because there was less of it in flesh tones. So gave the best separation to faces.

I thought green was the original colour used in proper film?
--
*If horrific means to make horrible, does terrific mean to make terrible?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought the film had used green (or in some cases, sodium yellow) for along time as the matte-out colour, and that TV had gradually changed from blue to green as so to fall into line with film practice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I'm guessing the OP is thinking of those huge searchlights that are more for decoration than illumination.
Possibly something like this:
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06jtmwb
Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
snipped-for-privacy@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

go to the D-Day programm on BBC1. All round the "blow up" stage.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.