Tree stump removal


wrote in message

I wish I had a digger. But there's clay closer to Leeds ... :-)
I ws in Suffolk last Easter, it seemed to be all flint and sand ... our grand daughters were selling flints to punters.
Mary

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On Sat, 3 Apr 2004 09:24:29 +0100, "Mary Fisher"

What on earth would flints be of use to anyone?!!
You know, when I was doing my garden makeover, I built a soil sifter to sift the stones from the (little) soil in the ground (here stones make up at least 50% of the content) and was left with a huge pile of stones. So, what to do with them? I wondered whether I could set up a web site, aimed at the Americans, and offer them a small "slice" of olde England for, say, five bucks a gem, sorry, stone. Each stone would be accompanied by a certificate of genuineness, having been dug from the soil of an English village and washed in spring water from the Thames. A jiffy bag would be about 50 pence, and with a certificate printed on my LaserJet using stock from Paper Direct, I'd make a fortune.
Instead, I thought, bugger that for a game of pixies! And used the stones as hardcore for a garden feature.
MM
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wrote:

I have no idea. I put that to the girls, that the visitors were walking on the things. They replied, quite reasonably, that they searched for interesting ones, dug them up, cleaned them and graded and priced them. then sat in the hot sun selling them while they could be playing. They didn't offer the option of axe and arrowheads.
I couldn't argue with that ...I can send you a charming picture if you like. They made more than 3 each on one day.

Indeed.
Well you've probably done someone else a favour, given them ideas ...
:-)
Mary

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Mike Mitchell wrote:

Flint is amongst the toughest - and IMHO most beautiful - wall plating ever. Brick and flint houses last forever mainly.
Makes nice cobble effect paths too, set in mortar.
Other nice wetherprropf effects are ouster shells, and I have seen a house built of glass bottles in the US desert.

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wrote:

Was that latter a protest against recycling enforcement?
MM
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You get very thirsty in the desert.
Mary

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Mary Fisher wrote:

You can say that again. Around 2 liters of soft drink an hour and all day without a piss.
Around 130-140F. Somewhat over 50C.

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Mike Mitchell wrote:

No< ithink it was more a case of 'I need a house, and the only freely available materials here are the bottles that the drink comes in'
Its in one of those 'ghost towns' abandoned by the miners.

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wrote:

If in Germany you could probably build a new house from the refund on the bottles, as everything is recycled there. Beer, fizzy water, and so on.
MM
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Mike Mitchell wrote:

Ah, I belive this house dates to 1860 or so.
Not much recycling then.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

IIRC, wasn't the house built by a mortician who used all his empty embalming fluid bottles?
Tim
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Tim Downie wrote:

No. I think it was just somethg a local knocked up.
I think the town is 'Rhyolite' which gives you a clue as to waht sort of place it was. Now a heritage site. No wood for miles, everything brought in on waggons presumably. So trash was just not removed, and someone built a house of it.
http://www.deathvalleyphoto.com/bw/pages/Glass_Bottle_House.html http://www.cmdrmark.com/rhyolite.html http://www.land-we-love.com/rhyolite_ghost_town.htm
And from the latter, the history... much later than I thought actually.
"The Rhyolite Ghost Town is located off Highway 374, four miles west of Beatty, Nevada. This was once the third largest city in Nevada. The rich gold mining made the town boom, and eventually caused it's end as well. Gold was found by Shorty Harris and Ed Cross in 1904. By 1906 there were over 3,000 people living in Rhyolite, and by 1908 there were over 8,000. The town was grand in it's day with three water systems, three train lines, three newspapers, two hospitals, eight doctors, two dentists, two undertakers, eighteen grocery stores, churches, an opera house, symphony, telephone/telegraph, electricity, over fifty saloons, and a red light district. When gold prices dropped in 1910, Rhyolite began to collapse. The Las Vegas Tonopah Railroad ceased it's passenger service to the town in 1916. The remaining residents no longer had electricity or water. The population dropped from thousands to hundreds. By 1920, there were only about twenty people left. One of the remaining buildings that is still intact is the L.V.&T. Depot. The Las Vegas Tonopah Railroad Station was completed in 1908, and cost an incredible $130,000 to build. Another building which still remains intact is Tom Kelly's bottle house. The 76 year old man who built the house used around 30,000 glass bottles to create this masterpiece. It took him almost six months to complete, finishing it in 1906. Paramount Studios used it in a movie in the 1920's. The ruins of many of the other buildings remain today. It is hard to believe that the Cook Bank Building was once an elegant $90,000 structure with marble floors and mahogany woodwork. The remains of the jail also still stand in town. No one ever broke out of it, but it was broken into twice. Many others, such as the hospitals and churches, were moved to other cities"

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Hmm, our garden..............
--
Chris French, Leeds

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wrote in message

You're near Meanwood Road, I think ... ?
Mary

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a bit further out and west - Lawnswood
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Chris French, Leeds

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wrote in message

That's near enough for me to come with a bucket :-)
Mary

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Mary Fisher wrote:

Depends which bit really. Its all classic glacial muck..The sand got washed out towards the coast but the clay is left stuck on the taller bits.

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bits.
I don't know Suffolk. We were at West Stow.
Mary

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Some pics of my stump removal as promised earlier. (Sorry it took so long, but Brinkster was being a real pain this morning, so incredibly slow.)
http://www22.brinkster.com/tykeshed/tree/index.html
MM
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Hire a stump grinder? The council ground out the stump of a large weeping willow which stood on the verge outside out old house - impressively effective. They took it out to below ground level, and nature did the rest after that.
Rick
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