TOT: Weeping for long-gone days

I’ve had a cold; a common-or-garden, not-very-severe but nevertheless quite pesky cold. It’s well known that the common cold is a great modifier of mood; in fact some experts say we’re all slightly mad when we have a cold and shouldn’t drive or ‘make important decisions’. Colds and other infections always have me on an emotional roller-coaster, but I forget about this from one event to the next so it always catches me unawares. This time I was agreeably anaesthetised from reality during the worst few days, thanks to various substances. But on the morning when I started to feel better I noticed that I was rather more jolly than usual. I put this down to the fact that the runny nose, sore throat, painful chest, and mouth ulcers were becoming less troublesome.
In the afternoon I was positively buzzing with happiness and contentment. But this wasn’t the lifting of mood’s baseline that I imagined, it was an amplification of mood; a turning up of the temperamental gain to 11. I was very happy and cheerful because it was a vaguely happy and cheerful day. Amplification, of course, cuts both ways. That evening some innocent fool on the internet mentioned the wartime BBC radio programme ‘Music While You Work’, and a worse fool, me, went to You Tube in search of it. The programme continued through the 1950s and was very popular at home as well as in the workplace.
Now I have to say that to many of us of a certain age, that signature tune will always be highly evocative, but because of my high gain emotional state this time it was something else again. When the long-ago band struck up with that achingly-familiar, oh-so-jaunty signature tune I was a sitting duck, and I got both barrels. Suddenly I was a little pre-school lad in my mother’s kitchen, the old Marconi wireless booming out until its knobs rattled as she washed and baked and cleaned.
Memories of mum flooded back, how she sat me on her knee and taught me to read by means of the Daily Mirror, how she made such fantastic buns — all the usual stuff we remember about our old mums. I remembered the half-built sidecar in the front room, the exciting smell of new library books, the Beano dropping through the letterbox. Under this onslaught I was quite unable to continue as normal, so I went somewhere where I could be alone, except for the chickens, and dealt with myself as best as I could.
Even old people miss their beloved dead. My sadness was immense, but it wasn’t simply for the loss of my mum. It was for the loss — the irretrievable loss — of a time now long gone, a time in my life and a time in Britain’s history. A time when many things were much worse than they are now, but when many other things were much better.
In my extreme old age (if I’m lucky enough to have one) I will remember my mother, and I will remember the Britain of the 1950s, and I will mourn for both. Meanwhile I’m looking for a box set of ‘Listen with Mother’.
Bill
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On Sunday, 9 August 2015 04:06:13 UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:

It's called "Bi-polar disorder" Bill. You need to see the Quack ;-)
You're going/gone mad.
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No I don't think so. Bipolar is just the mood thing on a hair trigger near the normal range. IE one little change and it flips.
I notice other changes between being ill and ok. its the bleedin obvious filter problem. as Paul Simon wrote. When something goes wrong, I'm the first to admit it, the first to admit it, but the last one to know.
I'm a bit like that in any case, but its really amplified when I get ill. .
I just remember the very helth and unsafe things we did on the way to Brookmans park. We, that is a friend and myself sat in the back of my dads van on the floor cross legged, and when the breaks were applied we slid forward, and when we had to accelerate, we went and hit the back doors.
Can you imagine anyone being allowed to do that today? Brian
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50 years ago, our scout troop bought an ex GPO box van (Morris LC5, or similar), and we used that for camping trips. Open the back doors, throw in the marquee, tents, kit bags and scouts. No-one thought it strange, and no-one was hurt. We travelled all over the country like that. Seat belts, what seat belts? What seats?
--
Graeme

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On 09/08/2015 08:44, harry wrote:

Sudden mood swings have been associated with other brain chemistry problems and need investigating as there is treatment available to slow some of the deterioration down.
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On Sunday, 9 August 2015 10:10:41 UTC+1, dennis @ home wrote:

I was only joking. He's not as mad as some here by far!
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On 09/08/2015 10:10 AM, dennis@home wrote:

Or could it be that, when a person has less of an interest of the ongoing outside world, they spend a little more time in the internal one?
Nostalgia is normal and should not be treated. Celebration of life is different for everyone.
Besides, I liked the story, made me feel a little nostalgic myself.
So, if we were to transpose those things to the young of today, what is it you think they will look back on?
Would I miss the 4 or 5 flyers coming through my door. Phone calls selling me loft insulation or, double glazing. I imagine somemone saying, 'Do you remember when we had to use a mobile device to get in touch with each other.
...Ray.
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wrote:

Do the older generation miss salemens knocking on the door? You still get some like Keeneze and even the odd desperate double glazing salesman plus the annual visit of a Nottingham Knocker* What about regulars like the the Man from the Pru ,do any still exist?
* The past two years as I have spotted one coming up the path and before he has even started his speil said "You are a Nottingham Knocker" they have got a bit indignant . " I'm not from Nottingham I'm from Yorkshire" Even effing worse** then I replied which seemed to ruin his day. This year it was "but I'm from Derby" Other end of an effing bus route then, now piss off.
** I don't actually mean that Bill.
G.Harman
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[............................................]

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Ah, the chime bar intro, and the Berceuse by Faure in piano version as the playout...............
Don't forget 'Puffing Billy' and Uncle Mac..............
Them were't days.
--
Woody

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wrote:

Being similarly old and daft I have a copy of a 2 CD set titled after "Uncle Mac's" "Hello Children... everywhere" which includes Puffin Billy (as spelt), etc, etc.
EMI EM1307 / CDS 7 91255 2
However it was a 1988 release. So even nostalgia may have moved on since then!
Jim
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Uncle Mac the kiddie fiddler?

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wrote:

What a great post from Bill. Brought back a lot of memories.
Yes, I bought "Children's Favourites" around that time, except I got it on two cassettes. I also bought a video cassette containing one of each of the original "Watch with Mother" programmes - five in all, one for each weekday. There's a prize for the first person who can remember the programmes' names - and the day they were broadcast each week.
Of course, I bought these for my daughter, who was around 4 years old at the time......
Talking about radios, when my parents got married in 1949, they bought a state-of-the-art radiogram. Huge thing, floor standing, wood cabinet, c 10" loudspeaker. The radio had 5 valves, L, M, S wavebands and also "Trawler Band", which was "top band". Living on the Fife coast at the time, we could hear the trawlers conversing. It was not AC/DC, and was made by the Seymour Radio Company in Arbroath. The record deck used needles, played 78s only, and was made by Plessey. I eventually removed the radio from the cabinet and used it free standing on a shelf.
Does any of this ring any bells?
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On Sun, 09 Aug 2015 14:03:46 +0100, John J Armstrong

Andy Pandy (who I thought was a girl, fooled by the narrators voice I suppose) The Woodentops Tails of the Riverbank (Which was boring) Bill and Ben
Damn, that's only four, I don't want to cheat with Google, and I know I will kick myself. As for the days, I should know because I bought the same VHS compendium (for my daughter of course). My wife bought me a Torchy the Battery Boy tape for my 50th. That wasn't shared with anyone else.
I am now the grandfather of a two-year-old, so children's TV is again important in this household.
I like to think that the floral transition into the magical "Night Garden" is a homage to what we have been talking about. I put together this little video to illustrate what I mean. Skip right to the end.

https://youtu.be/TsfhQggcG7c

https://youtu.be/TsfhQggcG7c

--

Graham.

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"Tales of the Riverbank" was my favourite, which I suppose only goes to show that different small children have different tastes. The other programme was "Picture Book".
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On 09/08/2015 7:40 PM, Graham. wrote:

Yep!

Hahaha! He was a fave.

In the light of the thread, I enjoyed that. Maybe you should allow the comments?
...Ray.
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Oh come on. Bill and Ben was actually called The FlowerPot Men'.
Weed anyone?
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Woody

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On Sun, 09 Aug 2015 19:40:56 +0100, Graham. wrote:

Muffin the Mule. And Twizzle.
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On 09/08/15 19:40, Graham. wrote:

Noggin the Nog Captain Pugwash Ivor the Engine
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