Timber Definitions

I understand PAR and sawn timber, but wandering around B&Q the other day - well it was raining - I came across "scant".
What is scant and what can it be used for?
I have to construct a light roof over a passage between the garage and shed and wondered if this could be used - it is cheaper than sawn carcass for the same dims.
Is this suitable?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, no trouble. Provided the size is OK for any joist hangers or whatever you're using. It's sort of half way between sawn and CLS.
--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guy King wrote:

Wot CLS stand for? Often wondered.
--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
these words:

Canadian (or Construction, depending on who you believe) Lumber Standard.
--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2006-08-17 21:46:50 +0100, "The Medway Handyman"

Canadian Lumber Standard.
Also, if you go to a timber yard dealing predominantly in construction timbers, it is known as "regularised", although that usually means pressure treated as well.
There's a Travis Perkins near here that does more or less only this and has good quality stock that can be picked through anyway to avoid bananas. Take a section through this and it's obvious that it has been pressure treated - dye has penetrated quite some way into the timber. Not the case with offerings from Wickes, B&Q et al.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<CLS>

My local independent timber yard reckons it's getting increasingly hard to get anything else. Thinking about it, it's a lot nicer to handle, the sizes are more predictable and accurate and it's easier to measure accurately for lapjoints etc. It's also a good deal easier to sort through to chuck out the bananawood that every bundle seems to have. I've got a bit sawn off the side of a bit of 4x2 which you could use as a hockeystick.
Given the size of the plant (!) that produces lumber these days it's probably very little extra hassle to put another machine in the line.
--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Certainly for constructional work, I think that that's true. There seems to be CLS in smaller sizes that is not pressure treated, but the larger stuff is.
I tend to buy the larger stuff and then rip, plane and thickness it to the required sizes
You can also get joinery grade timber, but that's a different thing entirely.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There's a lot about it here... http://www.clsab.ca/clsab.pdf
--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for reminding me - I must ring the woodyard and ask where the cedar for my conservatory door's got to!
--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I believe the CLS started being imported a few years ago only in some weird "standard" sizes, 63x38mm ISTR (2.5"x1.5"). Local yard only stocked in 2.4m lengths. Then all the 2x3, 2x4 etc carcassing timber went to the "regularised" standard, which amounts to the same as CLS, i.e. planed and round corners for safer handling. Still nominal 2x3, 2x4* etc, but actually a tad smaller due to the planing. Certainly available in long lengths to at least 3.6m in a good yard. Although round here its not treated as Andy mentions above. The C16 treated is still square and sawn finish. YMMV.
(*OK, 75x47, 100x47)
--
steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Medway Handyman wrote:

A joiner once told me that it meant "Cannae layit straight" (Say it with a broad Scottish accent like mine :~)
Well, it amused me!
Gerry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

==================I think this is the same stuff that Wickes sell under a different name / description. As far as I know it's an inferior grade PAR timber and the corners are planed off for some reason. It appears to come in short lengths and small sizes only (about 6 feet / 3" x 2"). At least that's all I've seen in Wickes. I've used some for shelving uprights in my shed and it still looks OK after about 5 years.
Your proposed use (light roof) shouldn't be a problem if you can get suitable lengths.
Cic.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I am using the free version of SPAMfighter for private users. It has removed 276 spam emails to date. Paying users do not have this message in their emails. Try SPAMfighter for free now!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cicero wrote:

I think its intended for studwork.
--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

==================It must be available in longer lengths than I've seen then as 6' isn't much use for studwork. Maybe Wickes just buy the stuff that nobody else wants. Is there any particular reason why the corners are planed off?
Cic.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I am using the free version of SPAMfighter for private users. It has removed 276 spam emails to date. Paying users do not have this message in their emails. Try SPAMfighter for free now!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cicero wrote:

Is there

Interfering busybodies (aka Heath and Safety) - to stop poor didums joiners getting splinters. Well, that's what I was told.
R.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The other explanation is that with relatively smooth surfaces and corners, the rate of spread of fire across the surface is reduced.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've just emailed the Canadian Lumber Standards Accreditation Board and asked 'em.
Wonder if they'll know!
--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, it is great. You can slide the entire length over ungloved hands without needing to find your tweezers. Much nicer to work with.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Christian McArdle wrote:

I think this is what the Canadians used to term "SPF" i.e. it could be anything within the spruce, pine, or fir categories. One of the reasons it's only used for construction is that it blunts cutters quickly and finishes badly. The sheds have used it for skirting etc in recent years but it's pretty poor quality compared to the European Redwood you'd get from a pukka merchant
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
80/20 wrote:

Thanks folks for your quick answers.
Yes it is a light roof - Onduline Corrugated sheets.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.