Rough sawn untreated timber

Can you still get it?
I need some 4x2" to replace some warped joists upstairs (4x2 on top of 4x2, top layer twisted and warped).
Alsford Timber claim not to do sawn timber, but they can plane the next size up down, which is obviously going to cost more.
Cheers
Tim
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Tim Watts

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Hmmm - most constructional timber sizes are imported as regularised and treated, though some larger sections are sawn and treated
I guess you need to match existing timber dimensions exactly?
Height only or height and width?
Height only, find someone with a table saw - or maybe a handheld circular saw with some jiggery-pokery.
Height and width - bite the bullet - and get it pushed through a thicknesser - shouldn't really be *that* expensive.
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Both: height obviously as flooring's on top. Width too as I'll be plating this one with ply (only replacing half the run that's twisted).
I have one other joist to pack up from new (600mm gap between the neighbouring 8x2s, rather bouncy floor in that region. In this case I'll glue and screw the new 4x2 onto the existing ceiling rafter.

I guess so - I'll ask them.
Cheers
Tim
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Tim Watts wrote:

eh? any builders merchant will do you rough sawn untreated lumber.

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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 08:52:15 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

Builder's Merchants and wood is not usually a connection I make, but I'll have a look at Parkers - good pointer - ta.
Tim
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As a matter of interest, why untreated?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

cheaper innit?
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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 10:47:42 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Not by much, at least over here - it's less than 10% extra for treated. Problem with treated (at least here, maybe the UK process is different?) is the need to use fastners that won't react and fail catostrophically within a few years; at least with untreated you can use any old screws and nails without worry.
cheers
Jules
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In the |UK its referred to as Tanalised .. might have misspelt that but as far as I know that doesn't corrode metal or does it??....
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tony sayer wrote:

Not that I am aware of, no,
Tanalising is only one sort of treatment tho.
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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 12:35:32 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson wrote:

Didn't know about that problem - is it bad on unplated nails and screws?
All of my new shed is treated timber, but the screws and nails are all stainless steel. The treated timber around the new loft hatch is held in place with galvanised nailes and the hatch frame with plated screws - are they OK?
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Peter.
2x4 - thick plank; 4x4 - two of 'em.
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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 14:01:31 +0100, PeterC wrote:

It depends what it's been treated with, and I'm not familiar with the typical UK treating process (other than remembering painting fences with creosote as a kid :-)
Over here it's all pressure-treated wood, and the preservatives used (I believe it's the copper in them) react with steel fastners, corroding them and resulting in eventual failure (in as little as a couple of years, I've read before). Stainless is generally recommended, or hot- dipped galvanised (but not necessarily fastners galvanised by other means).
I'm currently worrying about the dog-pen I built last year as I used galvanised screws there believing them to be OK, but only read later about the hot-dipping aspect and I'm not sure if the ones I had were. I'm tempted to swap them all for stainless sooner rather than later, just in case!
cheers
Jules
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On 14/04/2010 14:32, Jules Richardson wrote:

I may be wrong but I was under the impression that the preservative used here contains copper, chromium and arsenic and is not recommended for animal use because of the likelihood of them chewing it and ingesting the chemicals.
Andrew
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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 14:46:05 +0100, Andrew May wrote:

Used to be like that here in the US, too, but they banned it several years ago - all the new stock uses something* else, but it still contains copper and/or stuff that eats fastners :-(
* CA and ACQ - the 'C' is copper, but I can't remember what the other letters stand for :-) cheers
Jules
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Jules Richardson wrote:

Alkaline copper quaternary if you believe:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood_preservation
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wibbled:

The As bit is banned here and has been for a little while at least.
But I'm interested in the Cu component corroding screws. I was subconsciously worried about something like this, but I was considering how well glue would or wouldn't stick to it.
Think I would insist on untreated now...
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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 14:23:48 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

Well, if it's indoors and not in direct contact with moisture (e.g. concrete floors / walls) then I can't see a real need to use treated anyway. It might even be a hinderance in some situations, given how much it weighs compared to untreated.
cheers
Jules
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On Wed, 14 Apr 2010 13:32:40 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson wrote:

The timber came from Wickes, sawn and treated, then additional treatment was with Wickes rot/woodworm gloop of a couple of sorts - just on the bits that were cut and also those parts that would be inaccessible after assembly.
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Not only that, you have to take a bit more care cutting treated timber inside to avoid too much toxic dust floating about or being left in the fabric of the building.
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John.

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John Rumm wrote:

Worth pointing out that "rough sawn" softwood isn't dry enough for interior use, and will almost certainly distort as it dries out. Roofing battens are sometimes actually wet to the touch, so heaven knows what the actual moisture content is. Standard PAR redwood is dried to around 17%, which is about right for this application.
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