Tiling

Any tips or lessons learned on tiling around and into a window recess in a bathroom?
--
>
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

Mitred tile trim is the only neat way. You may need masking tape to hold it in place if your corners aren't perfectly square
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is that the stuff that has a radius and an edge that sticks under a row of tiles? If so, I have bought some - is it best to put it under the wall tiles - or the window recess tiles?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 07 Jan 2007 13:07:32 GMT, John wrote:

Probably but there are different types...

I've just done a recess with it under the recces tiles. This is so that the face is flat. I had thin tiles and they fitted into the trim, leaving a step. I felt that the action of wiping the walls down could snag on this step and also force muck into the corner between tile and trim. With the step facing into the recess if muck does accumulate your less likely to see it and wiping is likely to be less vigourous across the trim being more up/down.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Liquorice wrote:

You could build up with adhesive or cement/sand so that there is no step. Also, I make sure the concave section of the trim is mostly filled in with tile adhesive, since you see a lot of bathrooms where the grout around the trim has caved in, presumably since there was empty space left in there. Simon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sm_jamieson wrote:

Or get the right size trim :-)
Also, I make sure the concave section of the trim is mostly

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

That's the stuff. I don't think it matters which way the flat bit goes as long as all 4 are the same. You're effectively framing the window opening so nice tight mitres are the priority, even if you have to use a bit more grout to make that possible
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stuart Noble wrote:

It isn't the only way. You can also overlap the insides with the wall. Make sure the cut edges are not visible tho. If they are natural stone or edge glazed this is very effective.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am about to experiment with cutting the tiles with a 45 degree edge, so that they mitre together instead of showing a square edge.
I am a bit wary about creating sharp edges, but a combination of fine abrasive paper and grout should hopefully do the trick.
We shall see ;-)
Dave R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
|
| |> Any tips or lessons learned on tiling around and into a window recess in a |> bathroom? |> | |I am about to experiment with cutting the tiles with a 45 degree edge, so |that they mitre together instead of showing a square edge. | |I am a bit wary about creating sharp edges, but a combination of fine |abrasive paper and grout should hopefully do the trick. | |We shall see ;-)
I really would not wish to fall against such an edge.
--
Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Google Groups is IME the *worst*
method of accessing usenet. GG subscribers would be well advised get a
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Fawthrop wrote:

Its not bad of you use abrasives to blend it off. It chips easily though. I prefer to overlap.. I hate edgings. Muck collectors and ugly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David W.E. Roberts wrote:

That "experiment" has been done before. If the walls are perfectly flat, and the mitres 100% perfect, it will be a razor edge. If not, it'll be jagged AND look a mess. Plastic edging is a godsend round windows because it allows you to correct discrepancies and create straightness

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use the window as the 'centre' for the tiling on that wall. It's also sometimes easier to adjust the ledge height and the position of the reveals etc to avoid needing tiny strips of tiles. Purpose made beading for the corners can look good especially in a contrasting colour - like say chrome. Other thing to consider is, say, a hardwood sill if the window features heavily.
--
*Why do overlook and oversee mean opposite things? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.