This seems effective and green.

http://www.ionacapital.co.uk/page/110/Howla-Hay-Biogas.htm
It seems to run 24/7 and has done so far as I know, for at least 2+ years, but what do the experts think?
We are staying just a short walk away from the installation.
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On 3/28/2017 2:51 PM, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Havn't heard anything about the Ambridge one for a while.
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On Tuesday, 28 March 2017 14:51:37 UTC+1, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Great technology for the 3rd world. China has been issuing grants for small farm installations. The cheapest version of this technology is nothing more than a giant polythene bag plug plastic tube going to a one ring burner.
How it adds up in this country I don't know. There is the potential to dry the slurry then burn it too.
NT
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It does however involve the usual FIT theft.
Where does the slurry, "biocrops" etc come from, how far, and what cost is involved in doing that as opposed to doing something else with the slurry etc.
IOW, what are the actual economics when the FIT theft is removed?
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Tim Streater explained on 28/03/2017 :

The slurry seems to be augured into the tank, the gas collected, pressurised, then fed to the generator system. I don't know how much power it actually generates, but the substation and overhead outgoing lines are quite substantial.
My guess as a past observer of the installation, is one of seeing the slurry being brought in on carts, by tractors, obviously from other local farms.
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250kW.
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Tim Streater laid this down on his screen :

So probably not much output for a lot of investment building the facility then? It looks more impressive than its its output.
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On Tuesday, 28 March 2017 18:42:05 UTC+1, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Of the facility I saw there wasn't much to it, just a huge tank plus a CO2 separator.
NT
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On Tue, 28 Mar 2017 15:11:03 +0000, Tim Streater

AIUI the feed for these small-scale biodigesters is a mix of farmyard slurry, i.e. runny cow shit, and crop residues such as stems, haulms, stubble etc. Under normal circumstances, the slurry would be sprayed back onto the fields, providing a modest amount of 'organic' fertiliser for crops, and the crop waste would either be ploughed back, also to fertilise the soil and improve its structure, or made into silage, hay, straw or even just burnt off in the fields, although I think that last practice is declining and may even be a thing of the past now.
If these biogas generators are going to be widely adopted, then the traditional uses for their feed will have to be replaced by something else. But stuff that would otherwise have just been burnt off, is being usefully used.

and when artificial fertilisers and soil conditioners have to be used in their place?
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"Just burnt off" is not actually so daft, which is why forest fires are not always a bad thing. The organic content burns off, but the mineral content does not and is available to be ploughed in. AIUI, that mineral content is then more easily available to new growth than it would be just from stuff rotting down.
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Stubble burning has been banned in the UK since 1993 to all intents and purposes.
The runny cow shit can be produced in huge quantities which produces storage problems , it also cannot be spread on the land at certain times in case the nitrates it contains contaminates the water table or watercourses so farmers are prohibited from spreading it for most of the Winter. That exasperates the storage problems so getting rid of it another way can alleviate the problem.

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On 29/03/17 01:23, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

ITYM exacerbates....
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On Wed, 29 Mar 2017 04:06:10 +0100, The Natural Philosopher

Correct. Comes from trying to complete and send the post by a low bed site light before the missus says "you are on that dam Internet" again.
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On Wed, 29 Mar 2017 01:23:13 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

But the biogas generator won't get rid of the nitrates, which will remain in the digester, and ultimately get spread back on the land, according to the OP's link, so the problem of timing that spreading to prevent nitrates contaminating the water table still exists.
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Which I've just realised answers the question about finding a replacement for the 'organic' fertiliser in farm slurry with an inorganic one. That in fact won't be necessary if the biogas residue is used back on the land.
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Nitrogen containing fertiliser is a large scale industrial product, so there must still be appropriate times and places when it can be used. Even if ecologists are still not keen on it.
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The ones that I know of get most of their biogas production from maize silage or sugar beet, one makes use of whey from a cheese making operation. These high energy inputs are what keeps the biogas generation stable. The slurry contains the methanogenic bugs from the cows' rumens that produce the methane and CO2 from the "volatile solids" in the feedstock. The thing is volatile solids is the food value in a crop, so much of these are used up in normal digestion, hence the crops grown especially are used.
I worked at a food waste plant that wet composted commercial waste (still fit for human consumption), which would once have gone for pig swill, the heat from the process pasteurised the waste which was then spread on land. Subsequently the plant has been sold and changed to anaerobic digestion for producing electricity, in engines and generators the heat from which keeps the digester at blood temperature, but in addition to the food waste it contracts local farmers to grow 200 acres of maize for silage.
As well as the gate fee for the food waste I think the plant depends of the FIT.

Digestate is still stored and then spread on the land, often the solids are separated out for later application and the liquid is used to irrigate all the time the soil is warm enough for the plants to make use of it.
AJH
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On Tuesday, 28 March 2017 14:51:37 UTC+1, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

It has been done for decades a sewage works. ISTR there are grants for biogas installations.
They are not very efficient using shit, a lot of CO2 is produced as well as methane.
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On 28/03/2017 14:51, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

If they are not growing their own energy crops on the farm then its probably not that 'green'. I wonder if it is financially viable without a feed in tariff subsidy?
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On 28/03/17 19:08, alan_m wrote:

Almost no 'green' solutions are viable without subsidy.
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