Teenager showers draining the hot water tank



It can't cope. He has told us. The cheap solution I gave is a combined combi/stored water system. He will "never" run out of DHW. Irrespective of how his family used hot water it will provide the DHW. Got it? I doubt it.

Boasting about being thick, eh.
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On Fri, 16 Jan 2009 17:35:57 UTC, "Doctor Drivel"

Your 'solution' (even if viable) doesn't solve the cost problem. I'd go with the timer and the mixer; that does.
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wrote:

It does. It is cheap and will never run out of DIY.
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Doctor Drivel wrote:

LOL! Now that I can believe.
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Just back from the pub, obviously.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

Please eff off as you a total idiotic plantpot.
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And still not sober even after a lie in. Seek help.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

Please eff off as you a total idiotic plantpot.
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When did cost ever matter to dribble - when it's other's money he's trying to spend? Just as well he lies about being a heating engineer - he'd soon be found out.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

Please eff off as you a total idiotic plantpot.
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

You could leave the original stat in place and just add another. Make them switch selectable and you can switch out of limited capacity mode when you want.
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On Jan 16, 7:08am, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

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Andrew is "An unvented cylinder" what we here in North America call "An electrically heated hot water tank"?
If so an idea?
Here a typical 'hot water tank', a) for 3 bedroom home, equipped with one (or 1.5 bathrooms), a largish top load washing machine and dishwasher etc. is about 33 Imperial gallons (roughly 140 litres). Although some homes, b) Those with a jacuzzi type bath tub, may have a 60 gallon version.
Each type has a cold water inlet, hot water outlet, pressure relief or 'blow off' valve with open pipe to some sort of drain. Each version has two 230 volt heating elements (top and bottom) each with it's own thermostat; wired in a 'flip-flop' manner. There is usually some sort of sacrificial (and supposedly replaceable) anode to try and cope with (depending on local water condition) high mineral content and corrosion.
First the upper element heats the top portion of the tank. As water is used new cold water enters from the top but is routed downwards. When top of tank reaches the preset temperature its thermostat flips-over and the lower element then heats rest of tank. (It is possible by moving one wire to have both elements operate simultaneously, but wiring and circuit breaker etc. must be capable of; a) 2 x 3000 = 6000 watts or, b) 2 x 4500 = 9000 watts.
Idea. If arranged as above; provide a (hidden) switch to disable the lower heating element. The available hot water with switch 'off' will be, approx. the upper half of the tank. Say 60 to 70 litres? Enough for perhaps five to six minutes of showering? When needed (parental showering) operate hidden switch to heat all the water in the tank.
Visiting a relative in the UK some years ago I was shown an electric hot water tank very similar to what we use here (after all the voltage available is the same!) and much described.
PS. Before anyone starts ranting about the loss of heat from these hot water tank heaters please note that the 'wasted heat' helps heat to house; and we use electric heat (hydro generated) anyway!
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terry wrote:

Not usually. Its a water tank that is usually fed directly from the cold main (and hence needs to be constructed to withstand mains pressure), and has some mechanism built in to allow for the expansion of the water as it is heated (plus various other safety devices). They can be heated electrically (and will often include an immersion element as a backup) but will usually be heated via the central heating boiler - typically via a heat exchanger coil built into the tank.

Andy's post about using a higher placed stat would do much the same. The indirect heating coil from the boiler will usually be placed lower in the cylinder, but the convection and stratification of the water will ensure the hot ends up at the top adjacent to the draw off point.

The most common arrangement like this is a cylinder with one or two heating elements similar to those which you describe. Each has an adjacent thermostat - usually built into a tube running alongside the element. The water feed is to the base of the tank, but it typically from a header tank in the attic (hence is lower pressure than the mains supply) The hot water take off point also usually has a vent pipe that returns to just above the cold water tank in the roof space. This serves to provide expansion room, and also as an additional safety mechanism should the stats fail and the water boils.
Again the same arrangement is more often used with a heat exchanger coil taking heat from a boiler. (using gas heating via the boiler is usually significantly cheaper than using ordinary electric heating here)

Modern cylinders here are usually fairly heavily lagged and don't loose heat that fast anyway.
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We run a caravan site which over the course of the season may have at times well over a hundred people on it, and at other times just one or two.
Water heating for showers etc. is by two immersion heaters in a simple direct cylinder -- one at the top, mounted in the standard boss, the other inserted horizontally, fitted in a mechanical flange. Very simple. Low occuptation -- top heater only. 3kW. Medium occupation -- bottom heater only -- 3kW. High occupation -- both heaters -- 6kW. Keeps four showers and hot water for wash hand basins and lundry going without any problem.
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Flow sensor followed by a motorised valve on the hot water feed with a one shot timer? So it closes after *your* preset time. Say 10 minutes. How the timer resets is up to you - after a preset time or via a control outside the bathroom.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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And some pipe and fittings.
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Standard reply from you - as it has been since you were Adam.

Indeed not. And you're lumbered with high servicing/repair bills for evermore - as well as the basic shortcomings of combis.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:>> As been said a high flow combi is what you need.

Please eff off as you are a complete and utter idiotic plantpot.
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Lobster wrote:

Timer switch *outside* the bathroom and a motorised valve?
Hit the switch: you have water for 5 minutes only.

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A really stingy low-flow shower head, like you get in student halls. The hot water will last longer, but they wont want to stay in such a feeble shower for longer than it takes to wash.
#Paul
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