Splicing wires in car heater...

Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Yes, I suppose you have to get it just right, with enough of the wire in there to stop it backing out. I started doing it with mains plugs (in the days when you regularly fitted them yourself, and had to occasionally attend to them), because I often found them with frayed wire inside. Bending the wires down, and screwing down onto the sheath was something I always found reliable. Hard to describe exactly, though.

Yes, I'll do that if I can. Not always easy with thin stranded wire, but it means you have two screws holding the wire, instead of just one, and maybe don't need to crush so much. I once did an emergency repair on a car clutch cable with one of these, and it allowed us to finish a touring holiday. So you might say I have a bit of a soft spot for them :-)
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On Thursday, 6 October 2016 16:23:49 UTC+1, Dan S. MacAbre wrote:

It's a fire risk
NT
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On 06/10/2016 15:32, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Following up my original post about replacing a failed wiring loom which prevents the heater fan from operating on a Peugeot 307sw - the new speed control resistor & loom end arrived today. RS hadn't delivered the Wago connectors by lunchtime - so I ended up using some heavy-duty blue crimp-on bullet connectors instead.
If any poor soul is going to attempt this repair, it's made a tiny bit easier by unclipping the wiring loom that connects to the speed control switch, and unplugging the two wires that go to the heater fan - but tape something on to them so you can retrieve them later. Gently easing the resistor end of the loom down will give you just enough room to get a crimp tool onto the cut-back ends of the loom. It's then relatively easy to feed the whole lot back up through the 'recirculation' air vent, and give it a quarter-twist to lock it into position.
If you don;t have arms like a gibbon and hands the size of a five-year-old then it's not quite so easy. Grr!
I think my local mechanic must have been getting a bit tired when he gave up on the job, 'cos after reassembly the fan was spinning but not blowing a lot. Swapping the polarity on the connections to the fan resulted in a fan that blows rather than sucks!
Apart from a bit of a 'hot' smell for the first 10 mins while the new resistor baked itself clean - all now seems good!
Now for the air-con! Adrian
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You are of course using Ratchet crimpers not those cheapie ones?...
--
Tony Sayer



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On 11/10/2016 09:21, tony sayer wrote:

Of course! <g> (Krimpit make - not sure how high-end they are - but they're not the cheapie 'squeeze & pray' variety)
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Have you ever made one of these pre-insulated crimps - then carefully cut off the insulation to look at the crimp itself? You should. ;-)
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*When companies ship Styrofoam, what do they pack it in? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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And those horrid things are even more likely to cause a poor connection on a car at high power than anything else.
Use a correct car connector properly crimped.
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*Reality is a crutch for people who can't handle drugs.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I did say as a last resort. It sounded like the OP was unable to use the 'correct' connector.
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On 05/10/16 21:55, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

20A Wagos:
https://eshop.wago.com/JPBC/0_5StartPage.jsp?supplierAID "1-412&catalogID=WAGO01&zone=7
32A
https://eshop.wago.com/JPBC/0_5StartPage.jsp?zone=6
I'd use the latter without a second thought in a car:
1) They are suitable for stranded wire;
2) They are resistant to vibration;
3) Well shielded - the sheath goes into the connector some mm, no change of accidental shorts.
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On 06/10/2016 08:22, Tim Watts wrote:

Thanks. I'd thought the 20A ones would do the job. There's 5 wires in all, so I don;t want to end up with too big a 'bundle' of connectors. Are the 32A ones bigger, physically? Thanks Adrian
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On 06/10/16 08:38, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

A bit - but the 2-ways are more compact than a 2 way choc block strip.
Given it's a blower plus cars can get damp, I'd over engineer and go for the 32A ones if it were me :)
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On 06/10/2016 09:09, Tim Watts wrote:

I agree! Just ordered a bunch of 2-way and 3-way connectors. Thanks! Adrian
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