SOT: Which car to use in snow?



I don't think anyone is doubting that the Daf/Volvo transmission had two sets of pulleys, one for each wheel. What some people are wondering is whether those pulleys can operate independently of each other or whether they are locked (maybe via common vacuum control line) to the same ratio.
From what some people are saying, they *can* select different ratios and so *can* act as a limited slip differential.
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Front both act from vacuum, rears are centrifugal according to individual wheel speed so produce a similar effect to limited slip diff.
--
bert

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On 11/01/2018 17:15, Tim+ wrote:

I had one. 1st gear would pull it up a 45 degree incline, but sadly they were made of baking foil so suffered badly from rust.
Nice comfy seats too.
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On 11/01/18 11:54, Andrew wrote:

Best ever snow car was LR MK III with military style 'tractor tyres'.
Better than the defender, and better than the freelander that succeeded it.
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Defender has better axle articulation so with similar tyres would be as good as or better than Series III
--
bert

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On 11/01/18 19:43, bert wrote:

yes
so with similar tyres would be as

Non sequitur. On snow all youu need is flat surface traction.
BUT the defender has wider wheels - you need to get narrow wheels with M&S tyres for it.
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Having rigid axles which can dig into the snow is not as good an idea as a decent independant suspension where the diffs are located higher.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 11:09:27 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I found that the front valance got in the way before the diffs on a DII:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/allsorts-60/4265281109 https://www.flickr.com/photos/allsorts-60/4265281313
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On the early RR the front valance was detachable for off road driving. Haven't seen many (any) Evoques off road.
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bert

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On Sun, 14 Jan 2018 21:13:07 +0000, bert wrote:

a
Makes sense, if it wasn't detachable it soon would be. B-) I was surprised the valance on the DII could bring the car to a halt with just an inch or so of packed snow pushd up in front of it and not suffer any damage. OK I stopped trying to proceed when it was obvious something was severly hindering progress and I simply backed away.
On most cars the valance would have flexed up and start to act as a rachet when trying to reverse making it a right PITA to get unstuck.

Land Rover have lost the plot. I don't know what I'd replace the current Freelander II (after two Discovery II's) with. The dealers I bought it from keep trying to buy it back and sell me a new Discovery Sport. Now if that "sell" was "give" and to the same spec as the FL II I might be interested but I doubt they'd be interested in giving me a £40,000 plus car in exchange for a 3 year old FL11 with 50,000+ miles on the clcok. B-)
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I think we've seen the last of LR as provider of a workhorse 4x4.
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On deep snow wider tyres are better. That's why Icelanders deflate so much.
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bert

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But still as shit when a diff housing gets grounded, at that point it becomes a shed with one wheel static and three wheels spinning all the power down the khazi.
If you want proper ability in adverse conditions with lumps in the middle of the track then you need something with portal axles like a Unimog or Haflinger or Pinzgauer and multiple diff locks such that sticking one wheel in the air doesn't strand the entire vehicle.
A more modern showroom standard vehicle like a Discovery or Range Rover with traction control, indiividual wheel braking and diff locks (as long as it's not screwed by electricial problems) will outperform any standard Defender in adverse conditions.
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Usually kitted with wide treads compared to SUVs straight out the showroom with road tyres.
--
bert

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On Thu, 11 Jan 2018 11:15:46 -0000, NY wrote:

And a full sized proper shovel not some little folding thing. If your in snow deep enough to have got stuck you'll have a fair bit of the stuff to shift.

Hum, I wouldn't stand on 'em. Car may lurch or slide sideways...

Basically avoid use of the brakes, gently use the gears and engine braking. A rolling wheel has far more grip than a locked one, it takes quite a concious effort to lift your foot off the brake when sliding towards a tree. Just be aware that whe the wheels start rolling again the car will probably instantly go in the direction the wheels are pointing. So if you've naturally steered into the skid to full lock there could be a very dramatic change of direction.
I find 3rd and 30 works most of the time, fast enough to have enough momemntum to whumpf through 2' drifts(*), not so fast that you might not have enough stooping space.
(*) Up here the snow is cold, dry and powdery, it doesn't stick together at all and is useless for snow balls or snowmen. Drifts are light and soft, might not be quite the same at lower levels with sticky snow. B-)
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And always remember stopping is harder than starting :-)
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bert

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NY wrote:

And for an automatic car?
I've been driving an automatic through all sorts of depths of snow for years, I think I may have slipped into a habit of the correct method of snow driving without realising it, but I always worry I'm overestimating my driving ability.
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Some autos allow you to start in a high gear on ice etc. Although not seen this on recent ones. I had a BMW E34 with the 5 speed ZF that started in 3rd gear with the winter setting selected.
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On 17/01/2018 04:07, snipped-for-privacy@mdfs.net wrote:

You are, everyone does. Some more than others.
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wrote:

In days of yore (well, in the 1940's and 1950's anyway), my father always had a set of snow chains in the boot, for use in emergencies (he was a GP, and being able to visit patients in all weathers was essential). But they're rough on the tyres, especially when you get back onto tarmac with no snow. Don't see them much now.
--

Chris

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