SOT: cordless lawnmowers

Graeme pretended :

Stealthy lol
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On Mon, 12 Jun 2017 09:29:42 +0100, Scott

At least you'll make light work of it.
G.Harman
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On Mon, 12 Jun 2017 10:45:37 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

There was a teacher at our school who every time he changed a lightbulb (before elphin safety) he would tell the class to hold their hands in the air then announce 'Many hands make light work' as he turned the lights back on.
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I'll raise you to Geese! Excellent burglar alarms as well!

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Tim Lamb

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On 11/06/17 19:01, Scott wrote:

The Bosch Rotak 36V is every bit as good as a small mains model - and in many ways similar to a smaller petrol.
The advantages are unlike petrol, it doesn't throw a spaz on a wrong sided steep slope and no mains cable obviously.
1 battery will do a smaller lawn, 2 batteries allow almost continuous mowing if you throw a coffee break in somewhere. 3 batteries and 2 chargers would allow unlimited mowing.
Grass pickup is good and it will tackle long dry grass if you start on a high setting.
Mine's about 3 years old and still going strong - just reground the blade yesterday.
I like the system so much I have the hedgtrimmer (can share batteries but is a touch heavy, unless you use the smaller battery intended for it.
Got the strimmer and leaf blower yesterday and very pleased with both. The blower eats batteries but is light, powerful and one battery is enough to clear the pavement of small debris after clipping.
The nice bit is once you have a set of batteries and charger or a pair of chargers, you can buy any of the devices in barebones format (like most better power tools).
Overall, I think the 36V system is *that* close to average domestic mains power levels of usability and the only real downside is juggling batteries.
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wrote:

Ours Rotak is a lot older than that , possibly around six years or more and still on the original battery even though I have been quite brutal with it regulary. I think they have had a cosmetic refresh or two since we got ours but the battery is the same.

One downside is that they are more expensive than the equivalent corded model by a good margin which is why they probably do the job as intended. That makes them a bit of a niche item for people with a particular set of circumstances like the OP or people like myself whose grass cutting is around lots of irregular shaped areas where I don't want to drag cords . I could use petrol but with the demise of the rural petrol station I can't be arsed to do an 8 mile round trip to fill a can of petrol and spend minutes behind someone buying grocerys or a lottery ticket.
G.Harman
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On 11/06/17 23:38, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

The batteries are expensive - mitigated to some extent if you have 3-4 of the tools and share one set of batteries (bearing in mind you can use the big battery in handheld devices at the expense of weight).
I've been waiting for Bosch to bring out a strimmer to replace the knacker Black and Decker that I had and whose battery was always unreliable in recharging (overheated, cut out, manual reset needed almost every time).
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On 11/06/2017 19:01, Scott wrote:

What about a simple push mower, no power needed, works great. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/WOLF-Garten-30cm-Cylinder-WPCM-Hand-Mower/172717799675
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wrote:

Haven't got time to read the remaining 35 posts in this thread, so I'll just say "+1"
We have used a push mower for years -- our back lawn is only 10m x 8m. We have bought Qualcast 38cm mowers (we've had two in 20 years). They are light, and they work; my wife actually likes doing the lawn with ours. I wouldn't go for the 30cm job unless your lawn is really tiny.
I too would ask: *why* is there no electric point available? You're doing a favour for the other residents and/or the Lease Owner.
John
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wrote:

The answer to the last question is that we would need to install a new supply and meter and probably pay a standing charge, which is not cost-effective to cut the grass once a fortnight during the summer months.
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On 13/06/2017 22:03, Scott wrote:

Where are you living? Around my way grass cutting needs to be done for around 9 months in the year to keep it at a reasonable length.
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wrote:

I am probably further north then. 'Summer months' is an underestimate.
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On 13/06/17 22:03, Scott wrote:

Doesn't the building already have a Landlord's Supply for the communal lights etc?
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wrote:

No landlord as the flats are owner-occupied. The proprietors factor the building. Communal lighting is provided by Glasgow City Council through a service agreement, using an unmetered supply. LED units so tapping in for a lawnmower would involve serious criminality.
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On 11/06/2017 19:01, Scott wrote:

As you are obviously in a leasehold flat, who is responsible for maintaining the grounds - the freeholder or a contractor paid by him? This should be covered by your maintenanance agreement.
Malcolm
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wrote:

Scotland, so not leasehold. We are self-factored, meaning that we are collectively responsible for the maintenance of the common parts. .
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On 11/06/2017 19:01, Scott wrote:

A friend has a Mountfield battery operated spinning blade, wheeled, lawn mower with grass collection (Approx £340). I've used it a few times and on fairly short/medium grass and it works very well. I would have serious reservations about its use on long grass. My experience with long or damp grass is to use a petrol mower. After struggling for years with long grass and cheap mains powered electric mowers a purchase of my first petrol mower a few decades ago was a god-send.
My friend also has the Mounfield strimmer/brush cutter which uses the same battery. This is NOT a light weight piece of kit and this does tackle long grass with ease. Personally, I also have a light weight battery strimmer but it is only good for 15 minutes of light weight edge trimming - use it on long grass and I get 10 minutes from the battery before it starts slowing down and become ineffective.
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But surely you will need to charge it so where is the difference. You still need power. I'm sure these devices have come on since I had one many years ago. then they basically used a small car battery but these batteries seemed to have both a short running time and a short deep cycle life as well, I guess cos one never used them over the winter it tended to let the battery decline. The new ones should be better but I'm not convinced modern battery technology has tackled the underlying issues with varying loads and running them too flat. Brian
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On Mon, 12 Jun 2017 08:39:41 +0100, "Brian Gaff"

I could take the battery into the flat pretty easily.

I assume lithium ion will be better than anything that has gone before. The Dyson cordless vacuum cleaner works will, albeit for a limited time between charges.
Thanks. The consensus seems to be that they are an expensive option and not as good as mains power. I may need to look again.
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On 12/06/17 09:37, Scott wrote:

Far more so - and the higher voltage types that you find on serious tools (36V/38V and similar) are extremely manly.
Do not confuse these with either the low voltage LiIons or anything that's gone before.

More expensive, but not expensive absolutely.
And I strongly disagree with "not as good as mains power". Unless you are regularly tackling wet grass that is 6+" high, the Bosch Rotak is just as effective as both a mains mover and a smaller Hayter that preceded it.
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