Solution for compacting/shredding plastics ?

Ah well, it's that day of the week the rubbish and recycling are put out. Our LA has weekly rubbish, and alternates between green bags (garden waste) one week, and paper/cardboard (blue box) and cans and plastic (green box) another.
Paper/card is no problem. It can all be laid flat, and often put into a cardboard box they are quite happy to take as well.
However plastic and cans are a different matter. We have a can crusher, which means tins take up minimal room, but ****ing plastic ! It is amazing how much a household of 3 (including one teenager) can go through. And no matter how much we try to crush the plastic bottles (milk, water) and plastic packaging, it still fills about 10 carrier bags.
Ideally, I'd like something like a paper shredder for plastic. Or something which can compact bottles. A quick google for "domestic plastic shredder compactor" suggests I will struggle !
Do any uk diy-ers have solutions for reducing the volume of plastic bottles ?
On a positive note, we used to put 3 or 4 bin bags out a week. Since sorting recycling, we rarely have a full one, which underscores how wasteful we are as a society.
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If you mean shredding plastic bottles to put in the recycling bin, you might want to check first if the binmen will take it. My binmen won't take shredded paper in the recycling bin, apparently it's "too small" and contaminates everything else when it comes to be sorted by hand/machine back at the depot. You might find that even if you could shred bottles, you'd have to put them in the "landfill" bin anyway.
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On Wed, 08 May 2013 11:06:25 +0100, Mentalguy2k8 wrote:

Round my way shredded paper is perfectly acceptable, being mentioned specifically as an item for the green recycling bin.
However, they also say you can't bag up paper products (into a paper bag), so the shreddings have to go in the bin *as they are*. Needless to say, they get blown everywhere by the slightest breeze, or turn into a soggy mass that sticks to everything else, so I put them up in a supermarket bag and bung 'em in the landfill bin.
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I try to fill plastic bags with rubbish but not tie them up, then I just empty them into the landfill bin and chuck the empty bag on top. I find you use much less space that way. Full bags tend to end up spherical and leave lots of gaps. It's like that old demonstration they did in my chemistry class at school where they fill a beaker to the top with sugar and then tip in a load of salt without the beaker overflowing.
According to the local rules, the only thing you can do with shredded paper is to compost it, it seems even the local dump won't take it. Apparently "shredding breaks down the fibres in the paper in a way that means it cannot be used in the manufacture of new paper. So paper mills that accept normal paper for recycling refuse to take shredded paper."
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That is correct, at least this is theexplanation mentioned in the info from our council.Under certain conditions strip shredded paper can be used, but not the cross cut stuff.
I also cut CDs into three with my shredder, it saves anyone getting hold of my data. Brian
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On 08/05/2013 13:10, Mentalguy2k8 wrote:

Can't see how that works.
Can see how you could add salt to a sugar _solution_ though...
Andy
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On 08/05/13 21:36, Andy Champ wrote:

interstitial space.
The salt fits in between the sugar grains.

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Terry Fields wrote:

Our council (Nottinghamshire) tells us that shredded paper is OK in our recycling bins.
When I visited the sorting facility recently, we saw that an early stage of the process was a screen which removed all small "contamination" which then went straight to landfill. This would clearly pass any paper shreddings.
It is seen in this video where the actual process begins about 2/3 through.
<http://www.veoliaenvironmentalservices.co.uk/Nottinghamshire/Facilities/Existing-facilities/Materials-Recovery-Facility/Mansfield-MRF-Video1/
I queried this, and they said that I was correct, but they felt that it was psychologically better to encourage recycling.
Chris
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On Thu, 09 May 2013 07:48:34 +0100, Chris J Dixon wrote:

<http://www.veoliaenvironmentalservices.co.uk/Nottinghamshire/Facilities/Existing-facilities/Materials- Recovery-Facility/Mansfield-MRF-Video1/>

I suspect that this faux recycling (dumping stuff that's been sorted by the consumer) goes on more than might be suspected. My council has tins (including aluminium) in one bin, but cooking foil in another, for example, and takes cardboard (including eggboxes) but rejects e.g. moulded fruit packaging even though it's made of the same type of cardboard. Black plastic is rejected by the bin men, even if it has a recycling code, but clear plastic is accepted even if it doesn't.
I used to take my mixed glass to the local bins where people would sort them into clear, brown, and green, until one day I say them being emptied into a collection lorry - which had but a single compartment, so it all got mixed up again. I lost much enthusiasm for recycling at that point. I later learned that this sort of thing was to 'focus minds on the problem'.
In the video, I had to smile when the chief man said something about the system being advanced, just as the shot went to a couple of people sorting stuff on a conveyor!
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On 09/05/2013 08:46, Terry Fields wrote:

The idea of separating further at collection than currently is effectively used might be OK. But only if thought of as a way of keeping as many options open as possible and allowing changes in processing without needing to change what people are required to do.
Also, any such policy and process should be transparent. "Please separate glass by colour so that we can choose to handle the various differently." Not being transparent is a form of lying.
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On 09/05/2013 08:46, Terry Fields wrote:

Exactly the same thing happens at my local tip. Large steel 'container' painted half brown, half green with holes in each side - but no central divider.
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On Sat, 11 May 2013 08:59:11 +0100, The Medway Handyman

Any colour glass can be recycled with "brown" glass, while clear and green can be recycled together. For it to be recyclable as clear, though, clear glass needs to be kept separate.
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On 11/05/2013 09:23, Apellation Controlee wrote:

There are machines to separate the colours, if the recycling company has one it doesn't matter if they are mixed.
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dennis@home wrote:

It all either goes to China for hardcore or goes into landfill.
Bill
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Given that it all goes to make fibre-glass insulation and non-slip road surfaces, keeping it apart is stupid and pointless.
Like a lot of recycling.
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On 09/05/2013 07:48, Chris J Dixon wrote:

<http://www.veoliaenvironmentalservices.co.uk/Nottinghamshire/Facilities/Existing-facilities/Materials-Recovery-Facility/Mansfield-MRF-Video1/

Ours tells us to put shredding in old cereal boxes. I can imagine that they've burst open by the time the arrive there, and that the shredded paper then sticks to the freshly washed plastic bottles...
Andy
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Jethro_uk wrote:

Um, have you considered NOT buying bottled water? If it's the taste that bothers you there are any number of undersink filters and other solutions to produce de-chlorinated water. Good for the environment and saves you a lot of money.

As Mental guy has pointed out, this is probably a bad idea. Separating out shredded plastic from your waste will be very difficult for councils and it will almost certainly end up in landfill.

I would look to your consumption and ask youself if you really need to buy so many things in plastic bottles. There are three of us in our household and we usually have space to spare in our wheely bin that's emptied fortnightly.
Tim
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I buy a 6 or 12-pack of bottled water every now and then, when I drink them I wash them thoroughly & fill them up from the tap and put them back in the fridge. I only throw them away when the lid falls apart but they can last for several weeks. I suppose the OP could buy one of those huge multi-litre containers of water to refill them if it's the bottled stuff he prefers. Then just hacksaw the neck off, fill up with normal rubbish and put in the black bin, it won't take any space at all.
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On 08/05/2013 11:23, Tim+ wrote:

Our plastics bin is also frequently full before collection is due. In our case my wife drinks a lot of fizzy water, so we have no choice but to buy plastic bottles of it. I drink a *lot* of milk, as do our three children and the milkman only delivers *after* we've gone out to work, so again, plastic bottles are the only option. If we could squash the bottles and put the caps back on to keep them flat we'd be fine, but they insist that caps must go in the landfill bin so the bottles expand back to full size!

Five of us and the plastics bin is only emptied monthly.
SteveW
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Just plastics? Ours takes plastics, paper, cardboard, cans, glass, metal, batteries etc. so I reckon we're doing okay.
Tim
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