Soil pipe -- to replace or not to replace

On 05/07/2012 10:29, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

...
Nylon was invented about the same time as polyethylene, but AIUI the latter had properties that made it particularly suitable as an insulator when centimetric radar started to be used.
Colin Bignell
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On 03/07/2012 21:50, ARWadsworth wrote:

Looks a bit like an iron waste pipe to me; don't recognise the collar at all. What happens outside? One option might be to fit a new plastic pipe through the wall to an existing iron stack outside (which is what I have). Then you can have nice modern unbodged pipework inside the house.
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Agree it is likely cast iron, I have seen one with a similar collar from a 60's build, the collar was sealed using lead wool compacted with an offset compacter/chisel type tool.
I'd cut it off 2" or so from the wall to get a lower entry and use a flexible pan connector to mate with the inside of the pipe. They're meant to be self sealing but I'd add sanitary silicone to the compressible vanes to make sure.
No need to disturb a cast iron stack in good condition, it should last a century. Hopefully the building is not 99yrs old ;-).
--
fred
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On 2012-07-03 21:35:07 +0000, fred said:

I'm still not sure. Other than a magnet, is there a test?

That's pretty much what I had in mind. How far down the pipe would you aim to get the flexible connector? Does further = better? I suppose there's a danger it won't seal properly if it's halfway round a bend instead of in a straight section.

Probably about 120! But I suspect the first bathroom was installed in the 1930s...
Thanks for the advice.
--
James


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It wont bend until it is through the wall so you have at least 4" straight there so nowt to worry about.
You want the pan connector to go into the pipe until it bottoms out or until all the fins are in which could be 2-4" depending on type.
From your other pics it's def a cast iron stack, that straight vent section at the top may be something lighter.
Other comments about the pipe being brittle and cracking are valid hence my suggestion to cut it 2" from the wall so that you can have another go if it breaks. Maybe start further away then re-cut closer once you have more confidence also noting that the further from the wall the higher the pipe will be and that it will need to match your new pan. My choice could be a 110mm angle grinder with cutting disk, mark your cut line, score round first a mm or 2 with the grinder then go progressively deeper until it is cut.
Chose the right distance and you can use a straight pan connector, which is better than flex. Smart move would be to get a few likely bits in from a place like BES, they're not expensive and it means you have exactly the right bit to hand no matter what.
See the bottom of this page:
http://www.bes.ltd.uk/products/121.asp
Distance from the wall will be set by your pan/cistern combo, close coupled?
Re comments about breaking into cast iron joints/stacks, just don't go there unless you have to, there is a high risk of breaking the collar if you do as it is all so brittle. When you do have to do it, you smash the ingoing pipe with a hammer, stuff newspaper in the hole to catch the bits then have to chisel out the stub of the pipe form the socket so not unsurprising that it often ends in tears.

You're welcome and good luck!
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fred
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newshound wrote:

Looks like clay to me.
Could be a bugger to cut without shattering
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On 2012-07-03 21:16:27 +0000, newshound said:

Thanks for the reply. I've just posted links to another couple of pictures of the outside -- see my reply to Adam.
Your idea sounds promising, if I can get the old joint apart on the other side of the wall without damaging it. How did you fit the new plastic pipe into the old joint?
--
James


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On 04/07/2012 13:26, James wrote:

In my case, I only replaced the vertical "vent" pipe (previous owner had replaced the angled one carrying fluid). As I recall, once I had removed all the old iron (a bit fiddly as you don't want to crack the junction) the new pipe "bottomed" on a step in the collar, which makes it fairly easy. Pack the bottom part of the joint with something like newspaper, string, baler twine, rope, etc and create a seal using suitable mastic or silicone. You can finish off the top with silicone, mastic, or even a cement filet. Since it never really sees positive pressure (even if there is stuff flowing down) the seal does not have to be brilliant.
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James wrote:

http://s428.photobucket.com/albums/qq6/adamko2020/?action=view&current 0_0642.jpg
http://s428.photobucket.com/albums/qq6/adamko2020/?action=view&current 0_0641.jpg
But it was lead I joined into:-(
--
Adam



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On 04/07/2012 13:26, James wrote:

Personally I'd remove right back to the stack, including the tee. You could put plastic into the existing flange and pack it or buy a plastic to cast-iron adapter (I'd assume that even if yours is asbestos, it'd still be a similar size).
SteveW
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James wrote:

i've cut one vertical back to the floor and fitted a 90 degree univesral to it
But it was brand new and unencrusted
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