Sockets in skirting?

I'm about to board some walls and wondering about sockets.
It seems perfectly logical to mount them in a tall skirting, I can do them at a point in the future rather than anticipating their position and cabling them now and adding to them later will be easier. I can't think of any negatives.
Opinions?
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Floods? Brian
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"R D S" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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R D S wrote

They can get whacked by vacuum cleaners. Bending over if you're an sod. Can bugger up the missus, if she's into moving furniture around every other week.
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Not a new build or total redevelopment so you wont fall foul of the 450mm minimum odd height now required for disability something or other.
I think the rules have changed however regarding sockets in skirting (whether in metal back boxes or not) with a view to being too close to flammable material and so not permitted (presumably you can't have any sockets in a wood panelled room either).
On the other hand, if you already have sockets in skirting then I'd be inclined to DIY more of the same (like for like) rather than create an unsightly mix-match, despite the breach in regs. This assumes you have proper deep skirting and can have the bottom of the sockets about 100mm off the carpet to avoid hoover bash damage.
I have original fabricated skirting here made up of a 9" odd flat board with a void behind and a 2 1/2" or so moulding on top to finish. That's plenty big enough to put sockets in, it's where the originals were put so I put the extras in there too.
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If the backbox is flush with the surface then I do not see a problem mounting the sockets on the skirting (or on wood panelling) provided they are high enough to accept a plug without putting strain on the flex coming out of the plug.
It's the old "let's just cut a hole in the skirting and screw the socket over the hole with no backbox" method that is no longer allowed.
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On Saturday, 27 September 2014 12:11:38 UTC+1, R D S wrote:

I've not checked regulations, standards, component availability - but it might be good to have a fair number of USB power outlets along the top of the skirting-board, facing upwards, with dust covers. Reasons obvious in hindsight.
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wrote:

Waist height. Feuck all that bending down to plug/unplug.
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On a tall skirting? Besides, if you regularly whack the skirting that hard you'll be forever painting it. And buying new vacuum cleaners.

Just interested in knowing how picking up a plug from the floor or close to it and then inserting it into a high socket is regarded as easier?

Sockets can be covered up by furniture no matter what the height.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

    Well, I always put new or replaced sockets in at about 30". I also try not to keep plugs on the floor. It's a lot easier to access high level sockets and they clear most pieces of furniture.
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If you have a cylinder type vacuum, the plug will usually be at near enough floor level when it's stored. Unless you pick up the entire thing, of course. Which will be heavier than the plug...
I really don't see why every socket has to be positioned to suit the disabled in every new build. Since they simply ain't in a decent place for just about everything. And look incredibly ugly half way up a wall, with cables trailing down to the floor, which can be a hazard on their own.
Is everything else in a new build designed for the disabled? Like no stairs anywhere? Suitable bath and toilet, etc? If not, why not?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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/Is everything else in a new build designed for the disabled? Like no stairs anywhere? Suitable bath and toilet, etc? If not, why not? /q
Indeed! I visited a newish build 3 storey townhouse that had a failed low w heelchair friendly threshold....WTF for? Even if said unfortunates could ge t in they then had a choice of the garage (with obligatory step down into i t) or a utility room, or lots of stairs... who TF would buy a 3 storey town house like that for a crip to haul themselves around?
Jim K
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On Saturday, September 27, 2014 5:05:59 PM UTC+1, JimK wrote:

wheelchair friendly threshold....WTF for? Even if said unfortunates could get in they then had a choice of the garage (with obligatory step down into it) or a utility room, or lots of stairs... who TF would buy a 3 storey to wnhouse like that for a crip to haul themselves around?
A high percentage of the population becomes disabled at some point, usually through age, less often temporarily due to surgery etc, so being able to s tay living in your house is somewhat of value.
NT
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote

The cables have a tendency to run along the floor when they're plugged in at a low level. They get whacked and in the real world, people don't unplug everything to avoid the cables getting in the way.

I don't put plug sockets low to the ground. They are a PITA and ideally positioned for kiddies to play with.

Sockets that are covered are useless. They also push the furniture into the room. There's often a clearance for skirting, but not an extra 2 inches for a socket.
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Quite - the cables run along the floor. Unlike from a higher one where they probably don't meet the floor for some way - presenting a trip hazard.

Then you need to take measures to make them safe for kids, regardless of height. Since kids can and will climb on things. I noticed in a nursery I visited the waist height sockets all had those child proof dummy plugs in them, if not in use.

Well just stop SWMBO moving stuff around for the sake of it.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 27/09/2014 16:43, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

According to this, the "dummy plugs" make the sockets less safe! http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/
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On 27/09/2014 12:11, R D S wrote:

When you say "in" skirting, do you mean "on" skirting in a surface mounting box, or actually flush mounted through a hole cut in the skirting? If the latter and you use a metal box on/in the wall to provide the back enclosure for the socket, then that is probably ok in itself. Note that running horizontal cables behind skirting is generally not considered good practice - but vertical drops up or down to a socket passing the back of the skirting are ok.
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Quite. But socket heights is likely to be the least of their worries in the average house - even a new one.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Saturday, September 27, 2014 11:29:12 PM UTC+1, Dave Plowman (News) wrot e:

g
I dislike nannying, and would rather the govt simply produced a good guidan ce document, which people can assess and take on board or not. However... t hat said, I've seen how much of a problem low down sockets cause people wit h various conditions. Its not a rare problem at all. Of course higher up is also a risk factor, creating trip hazards, and thoroughly ugly, so there d oesnt seem to be any one best way. Hence forcing people to adopt one option seems foolish.
NT
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On 28/09/14 10:50, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

If a householder *needs* a high level socket, it's not terribly difficult to run a few spurs up from existing. If you're cheap, do the spur in surface mount.
if your really really cheap mount a 2 way decent quality extension above the socket and clip or trunk the flex down.
Personally I find 14-16" off the floor just right.
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On Sunday, September 28, 2014 10:59:57 AM UTC+1, Tim Watts wrote:

Even cheaper is to get the social work to fit one of these for you free as a disabled adaptation
http://www.bin-to.co.uk/product_info.php?product_id !4
Owain
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