So, how many sockets in a living room?

Hi,
This is a bit of an electrical design question. I'm rewiring my house, and want to provide a decent amount of sockets for appliances in the living room, for now and for the foreseeable future. This room is about 12 metres square, i.e. not that big. It's also roughly square in shape.
Currently there are 2x 2 gang sockets, which is woefully inadequate. My current standard appliance list (which I think your average house has or will have) is this:
tv vcr dvd player sky games machine 4x for stereo 2x lamps
Which sums to 11 sockets. Sticking 6 2x gang sockets on the walls seems excessive, but maybe thats me being outmoded in the ring circuits I frequent?
But seriously, what is the solution?
Thanks in advance,
Jeff.
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snipped-for-privacy@razorworks.com (Jeff Sheard) wrote in

Going from all the frustration sockets give me, I would say a minimum of 8 doubles, two in each corner on adjacent walls.
May need a bit of Xmas treeing,but at least there'll be one shortish unobstructed run to wherever you need to go - unless someone knows better ;-)
(you're welcome to do a field trial by installing in my hovel)
mike
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I put two twin socket outlets in each corner and still find I need splitters.
Colin Bignell
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Wire two low-current devices into one plug - for example, Freeview box and video recorder. It helps if they have detachable mains cords.
I think this is quite safe if done neatly and the fuse in the plug is the correct rating (for example, a Freeview box and video will each have a 3A fuse. You'll still only need a 3A fuse with both wired into one plug as each only takes a very low current.)
Also safer than plug-in adapters and those nasty 4-way socket strips you see for 99p in DIY stores and pound shops.
--
.sigmonster on vacation



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writes

I prefer not to. It reduces flexibility.
...

The splitter strips I buy cost considerably more than that.
Colin Bignell
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On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 06:57:31 +0000, Mike Tomlinson
Don't do this, it's rough and wrong.

Anything is, don't anyone use those.

Buy some decent ones then.
--

SJW
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Yup. I've got 11 doubles in a through lounge and none are in regular use. Table lamps are on dedicated 2 amp outlets fed from dimmers, and the Hi-Fi/TV on a dedicated radial circuit with its own earth. But I'm ok for hoovering 'plugs' :-)
--
*A fool and his money can throw one hell of a party.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Jeff Sheard wrote:

10 to 12 doubles sounds about right.... (two in each corner, plus additional one half way along each wall)
(I just put 8 in each of the two bedrooms I just built!)
--
Cheers,

John.

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On 16 Feb 2005, John Rumm wrote

In system terms, what are the practical advantages to having each appliance plugged into a separate socket (as opposed to putting, say, the 4 stereo plugs into a trailing socket)?
I'm more interested in the safety/functionality trade-off than in "theoretical flows as measured by an oscilloscope", as cable control is, I think, a lot easier with 4>1 than 4>4.
--
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Harvey
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Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

None whatsoever. I used toi buodl computer racks - we used banks of rack munted IEC and 13A sockets, and one flying lead from them to a socket in the floor.
Provided the total rack draw was under 13A, its all fine.

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Are you bothering with Part P ?
I guess you can't answer that ;-(
Nick
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Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

If you're clueful enough to wonder, there's no advantage ;-)
That is: Nanny would like you to know that daisychaining one 4-way adaptor into another into another into another is bad for you (each link adds some contact resistance, since many cheap 4-ways form their contacts with little more than bendy tinplate), and some numpty somewhere will plug a 3kW fanheater into the last one of such a chain.
So Nanny knows that in the limit, it's better to festoon the wall with lots of double sockets (at Regulation not-too-close-to-the-floor height, natch, thereby increasing the trip hazard...)
But if you avoid doing anything silly, consolidating multiple low-load appliances into a single feed through a 4-way, 6-way, or whatever is perfectly sound, can look better, and makes it more convenient to turn off multiple appliances which would otherwise draw 'standby' or wall-wart-loss currents uselessly.
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Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

None in particular from an electrical point of view (not for low power devices anyway).
In fact there may be occations with todays highly interconnected AV setups in living rooms, where commoning a number of devices back to the same power point can help keep hum under control.

The advantage of lots of sockets verses "just about enough" is more ease of cable routing, reducing trip hazards, and having somewhere to plug the vacuum cleaner in etc.
You can take it to extreams however... a couple of doubles in each corner does not look the excessive, however enough to satisfy the socket requirements for a big AV or HiFi setup will start to look silly because you typically want them all bunched together.
Personally I use multiway sockets fixed to (for example) the HiFi rack so that only one power lead comes off it even though it uses eight.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Jeff Sheard wrote:

The solution is to do what everyine else does and get a mini distribution board for all the electronics, and plug it in to one 13A socket.

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Jeff Sheard wrote:

lounge and 3 in a Dining room
CRB
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crb wrote:

It also says 6 - 10 for a kitchen 4 - 6 for bedroom (more if intended for a "young person" 4 for a bed sit 2 for a hall 1 for stairs/landing 1 for loft 6 for study / home office 2 for garrage 2 for utility room
--
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John Rumm wrote:

a
Time to ask The Question.
If there were plugs and sockets that took up half or a third the space of today's, and were fully compatible with 13A plugs/skts, meaning you could plug either kind of plug into any and all sockets, and they were to all the usual BS etc, would you choose to use them? Why?
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk wrote:

Probably not, firstly because I don't find the current ones that objectionable, secondly, you can see any attempt at size reduction will be thwarted by the first wall wart to come along.
--
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John.

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John Rumm wrote:

space
you
were
fairy nuff.

I dont understand that. Wall warts would have no effect on the use of smaller plugs as well as the present standard.
The way I see the size question is we dont to see want a long row of sockets on teh wall, but we do want more sockets to use nowadays. Fitting 6 sockets in the space of 1 double would solve that, and since both systems would be fully compatible, it would not affect the use of present plugs in those sockets, they would be usde as now at the same density as now. And the new plugs would fit the present old sockets too, so there would be no compatibility problem.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk wrote:

If you are maintaining compatibility, then you will need the same pin layout and spacing. So yes you could put them closer together (especially if you oriented each rotated 180 degrees), you could make the plugs skinny, triangular, and have the cord exit from the top (i.e. US style) rather than the edge. You could squeeze four (maybe even as many as eight) into the space of a current double socket. However if you plug an exiting design wall wart into one you would probably obscure four sockets in one hit.
--
Cheers,

John.

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