skirting boards

best advice please on best methods of fitting skirting .thank you..
-- billo
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Not an expert, but I glued mine on using 'no more nails'. The problems come when you have curved walls. Then, it is necessary either to edge the skirting into the wall in those areas where it doesn't make contact ( you need long props for that ), or you will have to fill in behind the skirting with plaster where it doesn't touch the wall.
Other things to consider are:-
Let the skirting boards acclimatise to the room they'll be fitted in, that'll take some days at least. Avoid skirting with propeller-blade twist or other warping when you buy it. Fit the skirting a little off the floor, can't remember the exact reason but it may be to do with the floorboards moving over the year and prising the skirting off; I imagine the width of a matchstick would be ok. If the wall to which the skirting is to be fixed is crumbly, stabilise it with PVA.
The other method of fixing is nailing to the wall with masonry nails, and you can either counterbore the skirtng so the nails can be filled over, or use those plug-utter thingies to get a really professional invisible plug over the nail head. Of course, you could always leave the nails showing if you're not fussy!
Andy.
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There has been discussion on this over the ears, a Google Groups search will be time well spent. Not really a best method, depends on situation.

Or use short pieces of timber held in place with cleats
screwed to the floor

Using MDf skirting is nice for this, as it is doesn't warp or twist

The other method is to use screw+plugs or frame fixings. I think this is the best method if the wall is uneven, it can be mixed with gluing as well. Frame fixings are a bit quicker, but screwing means you have a bit of scope for backing off the screw a little if need be to keep things straight fill (if painting) or plug the holes. Done well this can be pretty much invisible
A problem with fixing skirting is where the plaster well below the skirting has broken away. It can mean that as you fix the skirting the bottom pulls in. This can be got round in various ways - bits of wood fixed behind the skirting to pack it out, dobs of firm mortar behind etc.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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I used a method for solving that problem that I read on this group (I think). I drilled a row of holes along the bottom of the wall where the skirting was pulling in and then wall plugged them and put screws in. These can then be loosened or tightened so that the head of the screws keep the board at the right distance from the bottom of the wall.

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Ah yes, I'd forgotten that one - I've even used the technique myself.......
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Chris French, Leeds

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On Mon, 4 Oct 2004 14:34:43 +0100, chris French wrote:

And one I'll have to remember. The plaster in the cottage kitchen stops well above floor level, especially where it came away when removing the old (nailed on) skirting. The plaster that is left might be to soft to take a plug though and it's pretty thick, inch or more...
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Nice one. I've got a few skirtings to do next weekend. The plaster goes to within 1cm of the top of the skirting, so I'm anticipating problems! To think of all the offcuts of wood I've spent time chopping to size...
Christian.
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I took my skirtings off to lay a laminate floor and was thinking of using No Nails or similar to refit them as has been suggested here. I just wondered though whether it would be possible to get them off again in future without pulling plaster off the walls or splintering the skirting? They were nailed onto wedges hammered into joints between the bricks originally, but came off without much damage.
Rob
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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 13:50:00 +0100, "Rob Bradley"

Impossible to say without trying it.
I doubt the skirting would splinter - my experience of no nails type adhesives is that they form the weak spot of any bonding arrangement, however if applied liberally rather than sparsely then damage to the plaster may well occur, because plaster isn't particularly strong in a structural sense.
I think the answer has to be "it depends".
Andrew
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wrote:

Use a combination of new nails into into any existing wedges that are still useable and no more nails for awkward spots?
I did this 6 months ago in one room and the no more nails was handy where the wedge was completely loose or there was no wedge at all (short sections near corners). I only applied enough of the stuff the hold the board in place just and so I reckon it will come off again easily enough with maybe the odd bit of plaster. I will not need to find out for a few years yet anyway :-).

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