Simple but what brackets to secure kitchen base unit ?

Looking at this online guide
http://www.almostimpartialguide.co.uk/kitchens/diy_base_units.htm
It says to use 25mm brackets.
Not sure on which ones though
This one
http://www.toolstation.com/images/library/stock/webtables/85681.jpg
Or this one
http://www.toolstation.com/images/library/stock/webtables/99820.jpg
If none, can someone advise. I am placing an order with toolstation. If they don't have any of the type you recomend, please advise. Wickes had none when I looked, where else.
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Buy whatever you fancy.
Christian.
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thanks.
I know you were not doubt thinking.
"My god, surely people can't be this dumb"
but it's sometimes the small things that matter
take care
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The only way to become good at something is by trying things out. IME those who expect step-by-step instructions on how to perform every tiny task rarely become proficient. Take some risks, use your judgment. Ask yourself "why would this bracket be better than that bracket" - after all, they are just pieces of steel, no specialist knowledge is required to assess them.
--
Grunff

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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I can't say without seeing the cabinets. The article says that there's a 50mm gap at the back for pipes etc. - but tells you to fix it to the wall with 25mm brackets. Doesn't make much sense to me! But then, it refers to the cabinet "gable". I haven't a clue what it's on about!
--
Cheers,
Set Square
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Set Square wrote:

Is there any need for brackets securing the carcasses to the wall? when you secure the worktop to the units, alls thats needed then is to use brackets to secure the worktop to the wall. Job done.
-- Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

I recently had some worktops fitted by a pro kitchen fitter/joiner, and he said he doesn't even bother with brackets at all. Reckons if the unit is level and firm, you cut the worktop to size and screw it down to (or rather up from underneath!) the unit, then apply silicone to the back (with plenty going down the gap at the back). I was very dubious; but to be perfectly honest, he's dead right - the units are now rock solid.
Think I'd still some form of bracket myself, but I think the message from the above is that they don't need to be massively strong ones; anything will do the job.
David
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Much easier to fix the brackets before the worktop is on because you can see what you are doing. Saves grovelling about underneath to fix the brackets. Fixing the worktop to the carcass is easy, screw up through the holes provided.
Dave
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david lang wrote:

Easier still not to fix the base units to the wall at all. Then you have a chance of sliding them out if you ever need access.
MBQ
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

The brackets are useful for getting the base units level. You can pack them out instead, but a screw is easier to adjust. I don't think they serve any purpose once the worktop is on
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Stuart Noble wrote:

Do you mean a screw in a slotted hole? Sounds a bit dodgy for taking the weight of a fully laden cupboard.
I always use adjustable legs for levelling.
MBQ
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I suspect he's talking about horizontal alignment, rather than vertical - in other words, moving closer to or further from the wall - so that they all line up along the front edge.
--
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Set Square
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Set Square wrote:

Just another adjustment option. Those plastic legs are a fiddle and not particularly stable when you're moving the units in and out. I get everything level by other means and then tighten them at the finish.
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The sides of the cabinet touch the wall and can easily be attached with 25mm brackets. The void is behind the back. If you want to run horizontal pipes, you need to cut the cabinet walls.
Christian.
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andysideas wrote:

I'd buy some of the second ones Make sure the plaster on the wall is OK, and that the screws you use are long enough. 2" by 8 should be OK for the wall fixing.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
I'd use the second one;

The slotted holes give you a bit of leeway on the masonry drilling, don't suppose the price is much higher.
Dave
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