Shed roof

We have a small garden shed that holds various bits and pieces. When I
went in there to get the lawn mower out, I noticed that the roofing felt
had split at the apex and I could see light coming through. I have been
down to my local merchants expecting to be able to buy a narrow roll of
felt to tack on over the split roof, but I was only offered some
rubberized paint on, or another that was like a thick mastic. The
alternative would be to buy a wide roll of felt (about 3 foot wide) and
cut it to size and tack it on.
What would be the best to use of the three.
Dave
Reply to
Dave
Loading thread data ...
Dave,
Nip down to Wickes or B&Q and have a look for some 12" (300mm) Flashband - this is a type of felt that has an adhesive 'back' which you can gently warm with a blow torch and stick over the felt on the apex.
See this link for an example:
formatting link
scroll down to item 5.
This should give a temporary (permanent) repair.
Tanner-op'
Reply to
Tanner-'op
By advice is to re-roof the whole thing. IME they last about ten years. I thought had a few splits, but when I looked again..the whole felt was virtually disintegrated.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
On 15 May,
Get a full roll and replace the lot. You'd only have to re-do it next year if you don't.
Reply to
<me9
I looked at that after I saw how much felting I would have to buy, but the man behind the counter (independent DIY sore) talked me out of it. I might just go that route along with a few roofing nails.
Dave
Reply to
Dave
OK on that, I'll get my ladders out and take another look. I was not aware that it only lasted that long, but having said that, the rest of the felt looked in good condition.
Dave
Reply to
Dave
So, you agree with NP. When I take a look at it, I'll decide which way I'm going to go.
I'm not knocking the idea of a full replacement, it's just that I have not been well most of the year and I thought that I could do a temp fix until I am feeling better. Thanks.
Dave
Reply to
Dave
Dave,
I don't know why he "talked you out of it" but I have had some of the 'genuine' Flashband on my garage roof for around 20 years with nary-a-problem [in fact I think it's holding my garage together] :-) - and it has certainly outlasted the green mineral felt that I have have replaced twice on a much-younger garden shed.
But I would agree with The Natural Philosopher about renewing the felt - especially if it only the 'underlay' rather than green mineral felt.
Tanner-'op
Reply to
Tanner-'op
In message , snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net writes
At about ten quid for 10 metres, prolly a lifetime's supply
Reply to
geoff
It is grey, but surpassingly for its age, is in good condition apart from the apex wrap over. I think I will go for the flashband repair.
Dave
Reply to
Dave
I have looked for that and found no splits or deterioration... Yet.
I have a chance to inspect it today and the felt is still flexible and in good condition. Attempts to make it tare resulted a bit of stretching. I'll put the new felt idea away for the moment, but thanks for the info. I reckon the roof will be OK for another couple of years yet, though I am no expert.
Regards
Dave
Reply to
Dave
So it's failed along the apex is that a single or double layer of felt? It ought to be two. The top one being a strip going 6 to 8" down the each side of roof. I wonder if there is a little movement between the two bits of roof that has stressed the flet into failure, that needs to be considered for any repair.
Flash band has been mentioned but I'm not sure that is the correct description. Flashband to be is a form of self adhiesive flashing, that is the outer surface is metal, with a layer of bitumen like goop on the otherside to stick it down. Is good stuff though.
A length of 18" wide DPC attached with galvanised clouts every couple of inches along the edges would be s stronge and flexible repair.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
Takes me the best part of a morning, not including removing the old felt and nails etc. Mind you every exposed edge has a clout nail every 1.5" and covered edges every 6" but then this roof has to take Force 10 winds (55mph sustained gusting to 60 or 70mph) about once a year and F8 (40mph sustained) several times a winter. That sort of wind will happily roll an unfixed (empty) shed over.
formatting link
shed is now pinned into the ground with 1.5" square stakes driven 2' into the ground at each corner and bolted to the shed frame work. It hasn't moved again, yet...
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
Yes, that is how it has been built.
That was my conclusion after all the wind we got during the winter.
Mmmm can I buy it in small quantities though?
Dave
Reply to
Dave
Bloody hell. We have had winds that strong last winter and the old shed, mounted on flag stones has not moved a fraction of an inch.
My aerials, though, did give me much concern that they might blow down.
When I get a bit better health, I will drop them all down and give them a make over.
Dave
Reply to
Dave

Site Timeline Threads

HomeOwnersHub website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.