shed roof

This is an ordinary timber garden shed 8' x 10' (2.4m x 3m), the roof is
felt on treated sw boards on 3x2 purlins, a central ridge and a shallow
pitch of maybe 15deg. Very standard cheap wooden shed. Over 20 yrs I
have refelted and half re felted and it's leaking again, and the soffit
boards are totally rotted. The rest of the shed is of no particular
quality, and a a bit wobbly.
I was thinking of covering the roof with something better, hoping to
extend its life and usefulness - what would be good? Onduline?
galvanised steel? plywood and a rubber type sheet? some kind of new
material?
TW
Reply to
TimW
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I fitted coroline on mine the first time the felt 'went' the boards were in good condition, it's lasting very well, but not sure I'd go to the trouble if the roof was rotten.
Reply to
Andy Burns
Depends what wood is rotten. As I remember it, replacing a rotten roof panel was easier than the felt.
Reply to
Pancho
Similar to you, I have re-felted mine several times, but the water eventually got in and caused the chipboard roof to bow inwards, eventually to such an extent, I had to take the roof off completely. I bought a 'Tarpaulin' and covered the frame with it. I have it anchored with large screw-in hooks fixed through the corner eyelets..........it has held fast for 3 years so far and is water tight. The overhang edges flap a bit in the wind, but no problem. I bought 2off 8' x 4' heavy gauge chicken wire fence sheets to use for support, but didn't need to use them.
Reply to
jon
Soffits on a shed, there's posh! B-)
Or do you mean the roof boards?
Refelted our shed roof at least twice but it never lasts more than about 5 years before it starts to fail. Bog standard shed roofing felt, clout nail it down stuff.
Last time it needed doing I put coroline(*) on it that was Sep '16 and it's still water tight and looks almost new. The hard bit was working out the cutting list to minimise wastage as the ridge to gutter length was a couple of feet less than a sheet. So every third lenght you had enough "wastage" to do another length. I think the shed is 6x8 a 8x10 might not be quite so bad.
(*
) The name of the smaller corrogation corrogated bitumen sheet.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
FWIW, I've used a sheet of this to cover tools/bikes in the garden (supposed to be part of a project that never happened), and it's still in one piece and waterproof after 6 or 7 years:
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Reply to
RJH
That's because bog standard shed felt is crap! I have never been a fan of nailing through the top coat of felt either.
(If nailing, then nail a nail prep layer on - random pattern. Then bond undercoat to it, and cap sheet over).
I redid the one here when we moved in 12+ years ago with a couple of layers of torch-on felt (2mm undercoat, and 4mm mineral finish cap sheet), and its still perfect (and I would expect it to last at least as long again!)
Reply to
John Rumm
The only decayed wood afaict is the boards that are totally exposed on the gable end. I thought it was called a soffit but maybe I am wrong. A board which is nailed on top of the felt along the edge, and another vertical one.
TW
Reply to
TimW
He said wobbly does this mean the bottom corners of the uprights are somewhat rotted. I have a shed like this and I'm debating its future myself. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa)
IIRC the cheapest long-lived thing per square foot are the thin steel plastic coated box profile sheets, but you might have to bodge the ridge. If the boards are not too bad you could probably fit the sheets using sticks like shit type cartridge adhesive, and save messing around with roofing nails or screws.
I have to replace a corruline/onduline pitched roof soon, I shall probably board it first but have not decided whether to use metal or corruline. I have come to the conclusion that it is *only* worth using the corrugated bitumen boards with full boarding underneath. Mine lasted 20 years but a stables that I rent has only lasted 10, owing to sagging and splitting between rafters and purlins.
Reply to
newshound
my shed roof is full 18mm T&G boarded, I added battens for the coroline and used their ridge pieces, didn't get on quite so well with their end pieces, but it looks in good shape ~8 years on, no sagging. It's had just one very light pressure-washing.
Reply to
Andy Burns
Not in my case. I think the wobbliness is a slightly flimsy construction combined with some subsidence of the blocks it's sitting on, causing a little distortion of the whole thing. But hey, it's only a potting shed.
TW
Reply to
TimW
Chap next door had his shed roof done with a corrugated sheet that looks remarkably like the asbestos cement that it replaced. The roofer - he lives about 150m up the road - reckoned that it'll last about 50 years; the old roof was about 70 yo but 10 past it's 'best before' date. I did mine with Onduline about 3 years ago; the lean-to next to it was done with Onduline about 10 years ago - still OK but showing its age. The manufacturer claims 15 years if 'maintained' which, so far as I can see, is not leaving debris, especially moss, on it for too long. Next time I'll use the corrugated cement board or whatever it is, although 15 years might see me out (or 15 weeks the way things are going atm!). The pitch on these roofs is about 7 deg. so I used 2m sheets on a 3m roof, giving nearly 2m overlap (the rest is on the eaves). Harder material would allow more overhang and that would be better at keeping rain off the timberwork. The roofs are fully decked under the Onduline so local pooling isn't an issue.
Reply to
PeterC
On a very similar wooden structure I used 2 8x4 sheets of buffalo board. No felt, apart from a strip on the apex. Slightly more expensive that OSB and felt but much easier and will last longer.
Reply to
Fredxx

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