Shed base

Management wants a shed. Probably 8' x 6', so I assume the base would be best in concrete and need to be, say, 8'6" x 6'6", but how thick?
--
F

www.vulcantothesky.org - 2015, the last year to see a Vulcan fly

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On 26/06/2015 16:44, F wrote:

Consider concrete fence posts laid down & leveled.
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On 26/06/2015 17:29, David Lang wrote:

Sorted a base for a shed about 16years ago. Base was cut into a slight slope (about 12" front to back - shed ia 6 x 8) soil is solid clay. Laid 1" or so of pea shingle with fencing weatherboards at right angles to joists in shed floor. I am just seeing signs of subsidence in one corner - not surprisinly where the downcomer from the gutter discharges.
Malcolm
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Unless it is going to form the floor of the shed, a concrete base is unnecessary work and expense. Is this a bought or DIY shed?
In the last house I bedded some half concrete block down into weak dry mix sand and cement, and put timber bearers (fence posts) across those, resting on bits of DPC. The shed floor was then put on that, a little bit of a step up but that was no problem - did consider mesh a round to keep out animals, but it was never a problem. Plenty of under floor ventilation
Some alternatives timber bearers laid on gravel, or cheap paving slabs. But if the shed floor is straight on that I'd expect it to rot quicker
This comes up a lot here, I wonder if it has made it into the wiki. If not a google groups search should turn up old posts
--
Chris French


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On Friday, 26 June 2015 17:40:37 UTC+1, Chris French wrote:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Shed
NT
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On Fri, 26 Jun 2015 17:31:30 +0100, Chris French

For a smallish shed plastic pallets can make a good rot proof base , while not as easily available for free like wooden ones they are still cheaper than the proprietary plastic base systems which aren't much different and expensive. And there are some light weight plastic pallets around which would not be suitable. Last month I ordered 3 for a small shed base,the shed being moved twice in a fortnight for garden works making anything more permanent undesirable. Led to a conversation with the delivery driver a bit like a Ronnie Barker sketch.
Lorry draws up Me Are you delivering 3 pallets? DVR No,Only one Me Should be 3 DVR Only one on sheet Me Bggr ,I'll sort it later lets get the one off. DVR opens tailgate revealing pallet with black clingfim approx 2ft high top of it Me That's 3 pallets DVR No only one, wheeling it onto tailift Me Cuts open clingfilm with pocket knife, Look, 3 pallets DVR Still only one on sheet Me They've put 3 on another DVR So you've got four then Me Looks like it, What happens to the fourth pallet DVR You keep it
G.Harman
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On 26/06/15 16:44, F wrote:

4" is common on similar amount of well packed hardcore for a full on base.
But if the ground is firm, you can get away well enough with paving slabs on a layer of sand.
Or 2 walls with 2x4" decking bearers (joists) across.
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On 26/06/2015 16:44, F wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions.
It looks like concrete or wooden bearers on concrete blocks may be the way to go so just one more question... how many bearers?
--
F

www.vulcantothesky.org - 2015, the last year to see a Vulcan fly



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F wrote:

My 10x8' shed sits on five 8' fence posts (on top of a level-ish area of slabs) with some bits of slate to correct for minor slope on the slabs. No sagging or bouncing (18mm boards for walls, floor and roof).
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On 27/06/2015 15:34, Andy Burns wrote:

Sounds good. Thanks.
Just need to find a home for the greenhouse that's now redundant.
--
F

www.vulcantothesky.org - 2015, the last year to see a Vulcan fly



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F wrote:

Obviously four bearers would give you the same 2' spacing
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On 27/06/15 15:27, F wrote:

2x4" spaced 400mm over a 6' span will give a pretty decent floor for normal use - add noggins for stiffness.
The 400mm spacing is standard and suits sheet materials used in flooring both in terms of convenience and adequate support.
You could get clever and put the supporting walls at 1' and 5' giving a cantilevered base with a nominal 4' between supports - that would be very rigid.
All assuming it's a shed and not a workshop with large machines?
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If it's to be the actual floor yes. If it's to support a separate shed floor, as you get with a bought shed. Then bearers at 2 foot centres, as suggest elsewhere is fine (IIRC that's what I used when I did mine - 10x6 or 10x8 shed)
--
Chris French


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