SDS Drill recommendation please

I am in the market for a new one. Having popped into B&Q I see a good number of these with a great price difference. Bearing in mind that I will be using it for fairly infrequent D-I-Y work what are the recommendations? I would like a fair range of drills and a chisel bit, so if included in the price an advantage perhaps.
--
Residing on low ground in North Staffordshire

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On 28/01/2011 14:11, Moonraker wrote:

FAQ here:
http://www.diyfaq.org.uk/powertools/sds.htm
The ideal drill is light (around 2kg, not 5 or 6), has a good speed control (this matters when chiselling since it controls how "hard" you are hitting it), a chisel you can lock off in any rotation position (try cutting a neat straight chase in a wall with a chisel that rotates about with a mind of its own), and a safety clutch (SDS drills can't slip in the chuck, so a clutch that lets go before your wrist, chin, or gonads intercept the rotation is a "nice to have" (tm))
Alas that lot usually puts you in the ฃ90+ category with tools like a Makita, blue bosch, hitachi, dewalt, or possibly a ryobi.
Personally I would go for:
http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/scripts/details.php?cat=SDS%20Chisel%20Drills%20Makita&productd597
or
http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/scripts/products.php?cat=SDS%20Chisel%20Drills%20Hitachi
If however you just want something brutal for knocking stuff down, and making holes in concrete (with impressive exit wounds), then any ฃ40 shed special will do ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.

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towill.co.uk> scribeth thus

Makita!, around a 100 odd quid but the best DIY tool that I ever bought:))..
You'll soon find plenty for it to do!..
--
Tony Sayer


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wrote:

Bought a MacAllister a couple of years ago. Exellent performer I found. Came with quality SDS chuck some decent bits and beefy screw-on 90 deg handle. Cost about ฃ90 afaik remember. Agree with the above sentiment - and so much better than Masonmasters :-)
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On 28/01/2011 15:16, tony sayer wrote:

My Makita is a fantasic bit of kit. If you need a drill driver as well, SF have a 2kg SDS 3 function + a 14.4v driver deal. Site - which are made by Makita - ฃ120.
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/35402/Power-Tools/Kits/Site-2kg-SDS-Plus-Drill-14-4V-Drill-Driver-Twin-Pack
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On 28/01/2011 14:11, Moonraker wrote:

I have a Wickes 2Kg, cost about ฃ100 a number of years ago. Very good machine. Mine was a re-badged Kress, serviced by Draper who replaced a damaged lead FoC out of warranty. Worth a look at although I don't know if they are still made by Kress.
Malcolm
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towill.co.uk says...

I bought on of the ฃ30 cheapies a few years ago. It gets used a few times a year and has been utterly splendid in every respect.
This shape... http://www.screwfix.com/prods/58494 / all the cheap ones looked like that a while ago. They've got rather more variety lately.
-- Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.
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Fully concur. I bought mine as a bit of a one-off job (sinking a dozen or so sockets throughout the house) however I've ended up using to for a whole manner of jobs - demolishing an extension, breaking up a patio, removing tiles, drilling holes for pipes/cables through walls. Despite being a hefty beast you can actually be quite delicate with it once you get used to its handling (particularly with the rotation off and hammer turned off - there is then only the very slightest of hammer action so no danger of knocking huge chunks out). I've never found the lack of chuck lock a problem.
For all my jobs I've managed with a cheap muti-set of bits and a separate 500mm bit for the longer holes.
I don't doubt there are benefits with the more expensive but I really couldn't ask for more from mine, and I can't imagine getting neater/ easier results.
Mathew
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In article

I suppose it depends on how strong you are, but most of these low price ones are tiringly heavy to use for chasing walls, etc. To me, that makes a higher priced lighter one worth every penny.
--
*A will is a dead giveaway*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

<snip>
I was also going to vote for a 5 kg cheapie. Not tried to use mine for chasing but I would be inclined to go for a double disk cutter (and a very good vacuum cleaner) if I had much chasing to do.
The 5 kg is OK for drilling horizontal holes and of course the weight all helps if you need to break concrete hard standing etc.
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On 28/01/2011 17:19, Mathew Newton wrote:

And me; My cheapy lasted several years, including ripping up a thick concrete floor but when it eventually died - by now I was fully converted to the joys of SDS - I decided to treat myself to a rather more upmarket machine and now possess a DeWalt.
So from my experience, the big difference is in the weight: all the cheapies are substantially heavier so much less comfortable to work with. Also, as is so usually the case, they are just less pleasant and easy to use: fine control isn't so good for example.
So you pays your money and you takes your choice: essentially they'll do the same job but depends how flush are you feeling and how much use the tool will get.
David
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On 2011-01-29 09:50:57 +0000, Lobster said:

Another vote for DeWalt. I've been very happy with mine since I got it 5 or 6 years ago. I treat it dreadfully, but it always does the job and is comfortable to use. I only recently discovered that it did have a clutch - another plus - given I was core drilling through 2 foot of stone this was a must!
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My DeWalt was bought from TLC not long after their lightweight range of SDS drills came out. So well over 10 years ago. Cost near 200 quid. And worth every penny. It's a delight to use.
--
*I'm not as think as you drunk I am.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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From reading this thread one thing is clear - the whole concept of SDS is clearly a winner here given the unanimous praise for it; seemingly regardless of how expensive the tool is. It seems to me like one of the industry's best kept secrets - I know many a capable DIYer who have never actually used one and I can't help but feel they're really missing out.
Are there (m)any other tools out there that could claim similar? I'd have to rule out angle grinders for a start I'm afraid - I can't stand them for indoor use given the dust explosion...
Mathew
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In article <069237f4-c0c5-458a-b558-ede5ec0944d4

Soldering iron and multimeter.
They've saved me over a thousand pounds in the last twelve months or so.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com says...

Oh, and polyurethane glue.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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says...

Hammer!
... and a Bigger Hammer !!
... and last but by no means least a Very Big Hammer !!!
--

All the best,

Chris

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ulm@.4rubbish.britwar.co.uk says...

Ah - a believer in Percussive Maintenance. A man after my own heart.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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says...

Got it from my dad, "If a big hammer will do the job a bigger one will do it better"
He ended his working life as a hydraulics/pneumatics engineer ... his "clockmakers spanner" was around 18" long, he used to complain that it was to small for real jobs :)
In retirement though he made various scale models under a magifying glass using tools the size of cocktail sticks.
--

All the best,

Chris

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On 29/01/11 12:14, Chris Wilson wrote:

There is no problem so big that it cannot be solved by a bigger hammer.
--
djc

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