Room 'deadness' for audio playback.



There is a blind chap who taught himself to use echolocation to navigate around. Not just walking but riding a bicycle
--
Chris French


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On 28/11/13 19:27, chris French wrote:

I swear I can sense people at a distance as well. There's all sorts of things like body heat causing slight air currents and radiant heat..
And by day I check the wildlife. If the pigeons fly away from ME it means there's no one else in the wood at all..
--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
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On Wednesday, 27 November 2013 23:44:39 UTC, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

That's a very narrow choice.
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The two are very different. For recording say a classical orchestra, you likely need a hall with a reasonably long reverb time which is also contains reflective surfaces. If, say, a violin player can't hear himself being reflected back he tends to play rather harder. For a pop recording where everything is individually miked up you'd ideally use a much 'deader' studio.
As regards the listening room, you ideally don't want that to add acoustic to the recording, so the 'deader' the better. Lack of reflections in a room help considerably with the positioning of things in the sound stage. Of course a very dead room may not be pleasant for general use, so a compromise is usually needed at home.
The fashion for wood floors has done nothing to help this - a decent thick fitted carpet helps enormously.
The shape of the room is quite important too - the more it approaches a cube, the worse it becomes.
--
*If you think this van is dirty, you should try having sex with the driver*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 27/11/2013 20:44, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

the two sets of curtains are drawn. There is much less echo - or not quite echo but perhaps reverberation?

Related topic: I am put off visiting several pubs and restaurants locally (Cheshire/South Manchester area) as the interior designer(s) seem to have b*ggered the acoustics by excessive use of hard surfaces on walls, floors, ceilings and furniture in their modernisations. Sounds bounce around unrestrained. Localised conversations become unclear, so everyone speaks up more and more. Some even have an open-fronted kitchen to add the clatter of cooks throwing pans and cooking implements around.
Result: struggle to follow a conversation at the same table and the whole ambience becomes a strain - unbearable to my ears.
Anyone else notice this unwelcome trend?
BTW1: I even had my ears tested because I thought it might be due to my age or some other problem. Nope, and the practitioner confirmed that it is the building interior that is at fault.
BTW2: I prefer the decor (and beer) of less trendy places anyway - which probably is an age thing. :-)
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Yes, but the acoustics didn't occur to them. They were too busy in making it as visually impressive as possible. In fact its very difficult now to find a quiet pub anywhere ;(...

;!.. - Tony Sayer
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On 27/11/2013 20:44, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

the two sets of curtains are drawn. There is much less echo - or not quite echo but perhaps reverberation?

Related topic: I am put off visiting several pubs and restaurants locally (Cheshire/South Manchester area) as the interior designer(s) seem to have b*ggered the acoustics by excessive use of hard surfaces on walls, floors, ceilings and furniture in their modernisations. Sounds bounce around unrestrained. Localised conversations become unclear, so everyone speaks up more and more. Some even have an open-fronted kitchen to add the clatter of cooks throwing pans and cooking implements around.
Result: struggle to follow a conversation at the same table and the whole ambience becomes a strain - unbearable to my ears.
Anyone else notice this unwelcome trend?
BTW1: I even had my ears tested because I thought it might be due to my age or some other problem. Nope, and the practitioner confirmed that it is the building interior that is at fault.
BTW2: I prefer the decor (and beer) of less trendy places anyway - which probably is an age thing. :-)
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Well, if you have some form of recorder and set it going in the room then clap or speak or play a stereo, you ill be surprised ou how different it sounds to you than the ears on your head hear it to be when live. Use headphones to listen to the recording or use headphones for a live microphone.
The issue is that people hear things differently, and what souits one person will annoy another. Basically, the less reflective to sound the floor and walls and ceiling are, ie the more absorbtive they are, the deader it sounds. What you need to ask yourself is would that really be what you want? I was fortunate enough some years ago to go into an anechoic chamber where they test things for sound emission etc, and when there is no sound being generated in such a place, it feels very uncomfortable and as if the whole room is closing in around you. Brian
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On Thursday, 28 November 2013 10:30:13 UTC, Brian Gaff wrote:

Sounds quite cosseting!
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On Wednesday, November 27, 2013 8:44:54 PM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

sound of my lounge when the two sets of curtains are drawn. There is much l ess echo - or not quite echo but perhaps reverberation?
I used to work (in 1973) in the world's largest (at that time) 'dead room'. It was the anechoic chambre at the Building Research Station. It had 4 f oot long polyeurathane foam wedges sticking out of the walls and the ceilin g and the floor. You walked on an open wire mesh 'trampline-type' floor. The door (motorised) also had wedges on it.
It was very big; they had a symphony orchestra in there at one time.
I'd sometimes go and sit in it with the door closed. It was VERY quiet. Y ou could hear the blood going round inside your head. If you listened to someone else speaking you got no sensation of distance. As they walked awa y from you the voice got quieter but otherwise was unchanged.
Next door was the reverberation chambre - a huge room where no two walls we re parallel and everything was done to make the walls hard so the reverbera tion time was very long (20 seconds IIRC).
They would put test panels in a 'window' between the two rooms to measure a coustic properties of building materials.
Just though I'd share that...
Robert
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