Retrospective planning on loft conversion



It is not clear if this would make the property 3 storey.
There may be a *gotcha* in meeting the fire regulations which, I assume, would not be time limited.
Things like escape routes or fireproof stairwells. An expert will be along shortly.
regards
--
Tim Lamb

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Tim Lamb wrote:

Planning is NOT retrospective nor is building control.
If it has existed long enough, its OK.

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writes

But elapse of time does not stop the fire brigade declaring it uninhabitable as a bedroom for absence of safe escape routes.
Would you let your child sleep in such a room?
tim
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tim.... wrote:

No, but I would encourage some other peoples kids to do it :-)

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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. I remember "tim...."

Fuck, yeah. If the little bastard's not nimble enough to skedaddle out of the rooflight, he deserves to fry.
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[Default] On Tue, 2 Aug 2011 13:02:39 +0100, a certain chimpanzee,
wrote:

They wouldn't (have the powers to) do so for a single family dwellinghouse. For a house in multiple occcupation or other rented accomodation the Housing department may consult them (although I think such obligations have been removed under the RRO). In practice, provided there is sufficient smoke detection it would be accepted. There are plenty of three storey Victorian houses around without protected escape routes.

Different question.
--
Hugo Nebula
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writes

I'm not sure of the difference between a loft extension and a loft conversion - if there is one. It looks similar to the one shown here except it about half the size and is timber clad. http://www.laceybuild.co.uk/pages/21/attic_loft_conversions/Attic_Loft_conversions
The property was built pre 1900 so traditional building methods would probably have been used in the original construction.
Because the surveyor questioned the integrity of the loft extension, he has valued the property by about 30K less than the amount offered by the prospective buyers. They are still willing to press ahead with the sale as long as the issue with the loft extension can be resolved.
I am hoping that if the seller can get a Certificate of Lawful Development and also taking into account that extension has remained structurally sound for the last 40 years, that the buyers (and their solicitor) will be satisfied. Once a COLD has been issued, can it be used by any future owner wishing to sell the property?
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[Default] On Mon, 1 Aug 2011 21:14:33 +0100, a certain chimpanzee,

Not the case. The Building Regulations in force at the time the work was carried out applied to it but, as no such application was made, it is unauthorised. A Regularisation Certificate can be applied for, but only for work carried out after November 1985.
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Hugo Nebula
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Hugo Nebula wrote:

so what is the exact case here then Hugo? It is as it is, and there's no regularising of it because it is de facto regular anyway?
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On Wed, 03 Aug 2011 02:03:27 +0100 The Natural Philosopher wrote :

It's not "regular anyway" - it might be totally non compliant or you just don't know (is there insulation and a vapour barrier in the dormer flat roof?) but after the stated period the LA can do nothing in most cases.
A regularisation certificate is a belated Building Regs approval so you have to show that the works complies with the Regs (in force at the time the work was done? current?), which may involve opening up, structural calcs etc. The only time I can think that you'd put yourself through this is that you're selling and a purchasers requires it or it's leasehold property and you are being required to produce a RC by the freeholder (invariably your lease would say that you needed to get the freeholder's consent and this in turn would be subject to BR approval).
--
Tony Bryer, Greentram: 'Software to build on',
Melbourne, Australia www.greentram.com
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On 01/08/2011 21:14, Wesley wrote:

I'd expect this to refer to _extra_ volume created by the work. So if the conversion was contained entirely within the existing roof space and nothing like dormer windows were added then the figure would be zero.
--
Mike Clarke

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Yes, that's correct. However it was impossible to work out how much extra space had been added compared to the original loft space. Because of the stud walls which had been constructed, there was no way to work this out.
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On 04/08/2011 15:15, Wesley wrote:

Ignore the walls etc, just look at the change to the outer envelope of the roof. So if a dormer was added - work out the volume of the triangular bit that projects from the roof line.
So a conversion that just added roof windows and nothing else would be no increase in volume. A dormer or two would add a little, and a hip to gable conversion perhaps a bit more.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Thanks John but it is not possible to get access to the 'outer envelope' of the roof because of the new walls and ceiling in the extension. - Unless I get up on the roof and try to measure it from the outside :-0.
Its easy enough to work out the volume of the dormer but not the original loftspace.
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On 04/08/2011 18:18, Wesley wrote:

You may find you can get an estimate from outside counting tiles across and up the slope. Bit of maths will tell you the rest.

That is all you normally need - they are usually only interested in the volume added.
--
Cheers,

John.

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